Curry Thread..

They nearly all are, most particularly from Sylhet in Bangladesh. Much of their stuff is inauthentic, fabricated nonsense made for the British palate It was ever thus, but quite tasty nevertheless.

More recently, the sauces have become less robust (less meaty gravy) and horribly sweeter. I've gone right off it as a result.
Maybe a reason why I stuck to these two Pakistani places for my “Indian “ ...ironic isn’t it...

Lahore Kebab House

Tayyab’s
 
They nearly all are, most particularly from Sylhet in Bangladesh. Much of their stuff is inauthentic, fabricated nonsense made for the British palate. It was ever thus, but quite tasty nevertheless.

More recently, the sauces have become less robust (less meaty gravy) and horribly sweeter. I've gone right off it as a result.
Which gives lie to the claim that tens of thousands of new "chefs" need to be imported every year.
 
Maybe a reason why I stuck to these two Pakistani places for my “Indian “ ...ironic isn’t it...

Lahore Kebab House

Tayyab’s
Pakistan and Bangladesh were both once constituent parts of India, so in that respect they have a perfectly valid claim to 'Indian' cuisine, albeit of the regional, meat and wheat eating variety known to that part of northern India.
 
Which gives lie to the claim that tens of thousands of new "chefs" need to be imported every year.
The restaurateurs could quite readily get together and open training schools locally. They are very reluctant to invest. Importing, en masse, from the sub-continent, ready made chefs who are prepared to work for minimum wage (or much less) is the cheaper option. If they are brought in undocumented, then so much the cheaper and that much more easy to exploit.
 
Pakistan and Bangladesh were both once constituent parts of India, so in that respect they have a perfectly valid claim to 'Indian' cuisine, albeit of the regional, meat and wheat eating variety known to that part of northern India.
Fair enough. Though I understand that Indian cuisine is so varied and changes from state to state quite a bit...I so far had Punjabi and some South Indian cuisine and some stuff from Mumbai style..
 
The restaurateurs could quite readily get together and open training schools locally. They are very reluctant to invest. Importing, en masse, from the sub-continent, ready made chefs who are prepared to work for minimum wage (or much less) is the cheaper option. If they are brought in undocumented, then so much the cheaper and that much more easy to exploit.
And yet Chinese cooking schools do exist here
There used to be one in West London as well.
 
The restaurateurs could quite readily get together and open training schools locally. They are very reluctant to invest. Importing, en masse, from the sub-continent, ready made chefs who are prepared to work for minimum wage (or much less) and forced to live in a cupboard on the premises is the cheaper option. If they are brought in undocumented, then so much the cheaper and that much more easy to exploit and for savvy customers to avoid the bill by dismissing and laughing at their threats to call the Police if not paid.
Fixed that for you. Don't do it in a town where people know you, though.
 
And they are well needed. Chinese food can be a delight, but the general standard here is average to abysmal.
If you are in the Colindale area,
The customers are almost entirely Oriental, which I take as a good sign.
Likewise
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Recently come back from Lanzarote, there's a little restaurant just opened up, called the "Pride of India", in the area we stay . Around 12 tables, serves some of the best curry I've ever had and the staff are British from Stepney. It opened up when we were there and we were the first customers on opening night, 2 nights later word had got around how good the food was, it was rammed and you had to book a table. We booked up again for a week later and food, even though it was heaving was just as good as the 1st time we went. There's another well established one down the road, about 10 minutes, called Mumbai Masala, receives glowing Trip Advisor reviews, been there twice and hated it. All the dishes have rating with pics of chillis next to them from 0 - 5, even the 0 rated ones take the skin off the roof of your mouth, they seem to be catering for the large groups of Irish there who just want a hot curry.
 
Recently come back from Lanzarote, there's a little restaurant just opened up, called the "Pride of India", in the area we stay . Around 12 tables, serves some of the best curry I've ever had and the staff are British from Stepney. It opened up when we were there and we were the first customers on opening night, 2 nights later word had got around how good the food was, it was rammed and you had to book a table. We booked up again for a week later and food, even though it was heaving was just as good as the 1st time we went. There's another well established one down the road, about 10 minutes, called Mumbai Masala, receives glowing Trip Advisor reviews, been there twice and hated it. All the dishes have rating with pics of chillis next to them from 0 - 5, even the 0 rated ones take the skin off the roof of your mouth, they seem to be catering for the large groups of Irish there who just want a hot curry.
Do you guys use apps like Yelp much? Somehow I stumbled upon more delish restaurants in Europe, even if they don't have many reviews here in Europe (unlike TripAdvisor)....I randomly walked into and 2 Michelin stared French restaurant in Paris one evening while exploring Paris just because of it, without a reservation as well...managed to get a table for two...amazing 7 course meal for about 100 Euros. It also helped me discover "Barrafina" here in London, for Tapas....highly recommend this restaurant....tiny...with just stools to sit around a bar or you stand...so have to get there early when they open to get any chance to grabbing a seat.
 
This the funky Sri Lankan curry powder I found a few months ago in London. Went back to Sambal in Colindale when I was in Blighty last month but unfortunately they were out of it.
Recommended.....

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Pakistan and Bangladesh were both once constituent parts of India, so in that respect they have a perfectly valid claim to 'Indian' cuisine, albeit of the regional, meat and wheat eating variety known to that part of northern India.
They used to be Pakistan
 
If you are in the Colindale area,
The customers are almost entirely Oriental, which I take as a good sign.
Likewise
I have been for a few curries with Indians, and if they sit by the window we get a massive discount.
 
So the British Navy introduced the curry to Japan huh?
Didn't take long for the other Self Defence Force components to get in on the act though.
They are endorsing their own brand curry.

Picked this 'Power Curry' up in a supermarket in Naha (packaging flattened to get in the scanner). It may be local to Okinawa as the logo refers to JGSDF Camp Okinawa
'Power' seems to indicate its strength-giving quality as it is only classed as medium hot.
Only bought it because of the novelty value, there was at least an Air SDF version also
,and maybe a Maritime one too,

It was fine but nothing special.

JapanSDFcurry.jpg
 
Didn't take long for the other Self Defence Force components to get in on the act though.
They are endorsing their own brand curry.

Picked this 'Power Curry' up in a supermarket in Naha (packaging flattened to get in the scanner). It may be local to Okinawa as the logo refers to JGSDF Camp Okinawa
'Power' seems to indicate its strength-giving quality as it is only classed as medium hot.
Only bought it because of the novelty value, there was at least an Air SDF version also
,and maybe a Maritime one too,

It was fine but nothing special.

View attachment 413700
One of my fav is Japanese Katsu curry box - used to be once a week lunch treat from Wasabi.
 
They used to be Pakistan
I expect that most people already know that, or I'd like to think that they do. Both ends of Pakistan were once constituent parts of India. They still remain a part of the geographical subcontinent.

I think I'm correct in saying that Burma, Ceylon and even the Aden protectorate were once administered as part of the British Raj version of India.
 
OK - need some advice. Not about a recipe. Spilled some curry oil on the bed while trying to open a takeaway container...and even with two napkins and a bedsheet underneath it managed to get into the mattress - amateur mistake. I did the usual - ran and got some detergent and soap and water tried my best to wipe it off. It's mostly gone but some still there.

Anymore ideas to fully clean it? Or should I just flip the mattress over and pretend it never existed. Never again trying to open/ eat a curry while sitting on a bed. It's like a freaking oil spill.
 
Try some Vanish Oxy on it. Make up a solution as on container instructions and work it in with a nail brush.
Same goes for difficult cooking stains on clothes...just soak them for an hour or so and put them through a short cold-wash.
Also, invest in a mattress protector.
Excellent for ****-stains as well.
Allegedly.

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