Current DE commission from the ranks guidance

Oxygen_Thief

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On ROPs
Apologies if in the incorrect place, but does anyone have current DIN or regulations for commissioning from the ranks?

Ideally need to know the current application process, and if it’s possible to redress/appeal if the CoC decide to arbitrarily stop you from applying

(And no, it’s not for me - I’m far too old for that now).

Edit: please don’t post opinions, I’d like to see the actual written rules or process.
 
@plant_life posted this on here a couple of years ago. Doesn't answer all you asked but it could be a start, especially how it progresses:

1. Education at GCSE level. Soldier POs must follow the same guidelines at GCSE level as their civilian entry counterparts; further or higher education, although desirable, is not required. GCSE requirements are thus:
a. 35 ALIS points or above (34 for SCEs)[1] from 7 GCSE/SCE subjects.
b. Minimum grade C/2 in English Language.
c. Minimum grade C/2 in Mathematics.
d. Minimum grade C/2 in either a science or a foreign language.
N.B. It should be noted that this is the minimum standard. ‘A’ levels and higher education give better potential; in particular ‘A’ levels may qualify them for an in-service degree[2]. Direct entrants will have an advantage in this area over those commissioning from the ranks.
2. Time Served. 2 years’ service must be completed in the ranks by the time they attend AOSB Main Board. This allows DM(A) to waiver the requirement to achieve UCAS points (used to calculate achievement at AS and A2 level) in addition to completing trade qualifications.
3. Age. The individual must be at RMAS by their 29th birthday. The selection and admittance process for serving soldiers is typically 6-12 months, but more time should be allowed. Individuals should be identified as early as possible.


[1] ALIS points from GCSEs: A* = 8, A = 7, B = 6, C = 5, D = 4, E = 3, F = 2, G = 1, U = 0

Potential Officer Process
1. The 9-stage process is explained below: however the soldier should concurrently register for an online officer profile on www.army.mod.uk ‘click’ JOIN.
a. Stage 1 - Identification/Interviews. Once eligibility is confirmed as above, the AFB 227 (Report on Candidate for Officer Training in Enclosure Link A) is to be filled out alongside interviews with OC and CO (or equivalent).

(i)Background study. As an ongoing process, the soldier should be developed as follows:
(1) Separation from soldier peers. If required, the unit chain of command may wish to separate the individual from routine soldier life. An example would be central employment (CO’s driver, Offrs’ Mess) or any position allowing for character and professional development, such as running AT packages or gaining extra AT instructional qualifications.
(2) Current affairs. ‘Reading in’ of newspapers/journals and joining organisations such as RUSI are expected.
(3) Essays. Relevant essay titles should be set and marked by a professional (i.e. an RMAS academic with the relevant qualifications and experience) rather than chain of command. These should be kept on file.
(4) Planning exercises. AOSB planning exercises are readily available on the internet (via Google search); ERLS have run sessions akin to that of the AOSB environment.
(5) Fitness. Individuals should be robust and fitter than the majority of their peers. Injury management/avoidance becomes important once selection draws near.
(6) Other preparation. The individual should also brush up on Corps history. Any extra-curricular development such as community work (Prince’s Trust) is recommended. Character should be worked on throughout.
Note: Once stage 1 is complete the soldier must then register for an officers profile online. This can be done by clicking ‘join’ on the www.army.mod.uk website. The Candidate will be asked to update service and academic history and they will be allocated a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) who works in the National Recruitment Centre (NRC).

b. Stage 2 – Medical. A full Pulhheems should be undertaken and faxed to the AOSB Medical Centre.
c. Stage 3 – Documentation. The following documents should be sent to RE Rec, as a flag brief, in order:

(i)AFB 227 Report on Candidate for Officer Training. Complete by OC and CO. Note that this form expires 12 months after completion and therefore it should be completed only if the soldier is ready to progress through the selection process.
(ii) Previous SJARs and Course Reports. Showing firm recommendation for commission.
(iii) Proof of Education. GCSE/’A’ level certificates plus any others.
(iv) Any other supporting evidence. Citations, essays, recommendations or notable achievements.
a. Stage 4 – Capbadge Specific Potential Officer Familiarisation visit (OFV) and Corps Colonel Interview. As soon as practicable, the soldier is to attend the OFV.
(i) Welcome. They will be welcomed and briefed by capbadge specific recruiting staff before the main visit commences. The recruiting staff will check all documentation is accurate.
(ii) OFV. The first day is particularly important to learn the career structure and responsibilities of an officer. The second day will focus on the wider opportunities within the Corps and give the recruiting staff the opportunity to informally interview the soldier candidates.
(iii) Col interview. During the OFV they will need to pass an interview with Capbadge Col. This will be arranged by the recruiting staff. The subsequent recommendation will form Part 3 of their AF B227. This will then be sent electronically to the candidates Candidate Support Manager in the National Recruiting Centre.
b. Stage 5 - AOSB Briefing. Once the AFB227 is complete the candidate is then ready to go forward to the AOSBB. The soldiers Candidate Support Manager will book an AOSBB and forward an AOSB CV for the candidate to fill in and send directly to AOSB.
Stage 6 – Potential Officer Development Course (PODC). Almost all serving soldiers will need to attend, based at the Army School of Education in Worthy Down. The individual will be loaded on to the next course once AOSB Briefing has been passed.


a. Stage 7 - AOSB Main Board. The individual will be loaded on to the next course once PODC has been passed. Should they fail Main Board, they will be deferred for 12 months until their second and final attempt.
b. Stage 8 – RMAS Entry. If successful at AOSB Main Board, soldiers have a place in reserve and will typically attend the next RMAS intake, even if it is on the Sunday after Main Board. If there is time, all will attend the Pre Commissioning Course Briefing Course (PCCBC). Soldiers should be given an assignment order to RMAS and if there are any administrative issues, the unit RCMO should arrange an assignment order via APC.
c. Stage 9 – Commissioning Course and Arms Selection Board. Once at RMAS, there is no obligation to re-join your original capbadge.

The ALIS scores are now mandatory as there were quite a few officers getting through because they had a third class honours degree in yak hair basket weaving but could barely write their own name and count to 10 using their fingers and thumbs.
 

Oxygen_Thief

On ROPS
On ROPs
[
I’ve literally been here one day and I’ve used the search facility and found this
https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/commissioning-from-the-ranks.127121/

Wasn’t hard. Sorry, that was an opinion. You specifically asked for no opinions. My bad. Should probably stop typing.
It’s from 2010.

Hence asking for the current regs, which, admittedly it is possible that they haven’t changed - it’s likely that the process has changed.

It also doesn’t answer any part of my question

I want to read the official, documented regulations on the process - specifically around appeals

So, you can be a massive ******** all you like but your link doesn’t answer my question.

Maybe read your own link first eh?
 

Oxygen_Thief

On ROPS
On ROPs
@plant_life posted this on here a couple of years ago. Doesn't answer all you asked but it could be a start, especially how it progresses:

1. Education at GCSE level. Soldier POs must follow the same guidelines at GCSE level as their civilian entry counterparts; further or higher education, although desirable, is not required. GCSE requirements are thus:
a. 35 ALIS points or above (34 for SCEs)[1] from 7 GCSE/SCE subjects.
b. Minimum grade C/2 in English Language.
c. Minimum grade C/2 in Mathematics.
d. Minimum grade C/2 in either a science or a foreign language.
N.B. It should be noted that this is the minimum standard. ‘A’ levels and higher education give better potential; in particular ‘A’ levels may qualify them for an in-service degree[2]. Direct entrants will have an advantage in this area over those commissioning from the ranks.
2. Time Served. 2 years’ service must be completed in the ranks by the time they attend AOSB Main Board. This allows DM(A) to waiver the requirement to achieve UCAS points (used to calculate achievement at AS and A2 level) in addition to completing trade qualifications.
3. Age. The individual must be at RMAS by their 29th birthday. The selection and admittance process for serving soldiers is typically 6-12 months, but more time should be allowed. Individuals should be identified as early as possible.


[1] ALIS points from GCSEs: A* = 8, A = 7, B = 6, C = 5, D = 4, E = 3, F = 2, G = 1, U = 0

Potential Officer Process
1. The 9-stage process is explained below: however the soldier should concurrently register for an online officer profile on www.army.mod.uk ‘click’ JOIN.
a. Stage 1 - Identification/Interviews. Once eligibility is confirmed as above, the AFB 227 (Report on Candidate for Officer Training in Enclosure Link A) is to be filled out alongside interviews with OC and CO (or equivalent).

(i)Background study. As an ongoing process, the soldier should be developed as follows:
(1) Separation from soldier peers. If required, the unit chain of command may wish to separate the individual from routine soldier life. An example would be central employment (CO’s driver, Offrs’ Mess) or any position allowing for character and professional development, such as running AT packages or gaining extra AT instructional qualifications.
(2) Current affairs. ‘Reading in’ of newspapers/journals and joining organisations such as RUSI are expected.
(3) Essays. Relevant essay titles should be set and marked by a professional (i.e. an RMAS academic with the relevant qualifications and experience) rather than chain of command. These should be kept on file.
(4) Planning exercises. AOSB planning exercises are readily available on the internet (via Google search); ERLS have run sessions akin to that of the AOSB environment.
(5) Fitness. Individuals should be robust and fitter than the majority of their peers. Injury management/avoidance becomes important once selection draws near.
(6) Other preparation. The individual should also brush up on Corps history. Any extra-curricular development such as community work (Prince’s Trust) is recommended. Character should be worked on throughout.
Note: Once stage 1 is complete the soldier must then register for an officers profile online. This can be done by clicking ‘join’ on the www.army.mod.uk website. The Candidate will be asked to update service and academic history and they will be allocated a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) who works in the National Recruitment Centre (NRC).

b. Stage 2 – Medical. A full Pulhheems should be undertaken and faxed to the AOSB Medical Centre.
c. Stage 3 – Documentation. The following documents should be sent to RE Rec, as a flag brief, in order:

(i)AFB 227 Report on Candidate for Officer Training. Complete by OC and CO. Note that this form expires 12 months after completion and therefore it should be completed only if the soldier is ready to progress through the selection process.
(ii) Previous SJARs and Course Reports. Showing firm recommendation for commission.
(iii) Proof of Education. GCSE/’A’ level certificates plus any others.
(iv) Any other supporting evidence. Citations, essays, recommendations or notable achievements.
a. Stage 4 – Capbadge Specific Potential Officer Familiarisation visit (OFV) and Corps Colonel Interview. As soon as practicable, the soldier is to attend the OFV.
(i) Welcome. They will be welcomed and briefed by capbadge specific recruiting staff before the main visit commences. The recruiting staff will check all documentation is accurate.
(ii) OFV. The first day is particularly important to learn the career structure and responsibilities of an officer. The second day will focus on the wider opportunities within the Corps and give the recruiting staff the opportunity to informally interview the soldier candidates.
(iii) Col interview. During the OFV they will need to pass an interview with Capbadge Col. This will be arranged by the recruiting staff. The subsequent recommendation will form Part 3 of their AF B227. This will then be sent electronically to the candidates Candidate Support Manager in the National Recruiting Centre.
b. Stage 5 - AOSB Briefing. Once the AFB227 is complete the candidate is then ready to go forward to the AOSBB. The soldiers Candidate Support Manager will book an AOSBB and forward an AOSB CV for the candidate to fill in and send directly to AOSB.
Stage 6 – Potential Officer Development Course (PODC). Almost all serving soldiers will need to attend, based at the Army School of Education in Worthy Down. The individual will be loaded on to the next course once AOSB Briefing has been passed.


a. Stage 7 - AOSB Main Board. The individual will be loaded on to the next course once PODC has been passed. Should they fail Main Board, they will be deferred for 12 months until their second and final attempt.
b. Stage 8 – RMAS Entry. If successful at AOSB Main Board, soldiers have a place in reserve and will typically attend the next RMAS intake, even if it is on the Sunday after Main Board. If there is time, all will attend the Pre Commissioning Course Briefing Course (PCCBC). Soldiers should be given an assignment order to RMAS and if there are any administrative issues, the unit RCMO should arrange an assignment order via APC.
c. Stage 9 – Commissioning Course and Arms Selection Board. Once at RMAS, there is no obligation to re-join your original capbadge.

The ALIS scores are now mandatory as there were quite a few officers getting through because they had a third class honours degree in yak hair basket weaving but could barely write their own name and count to 10 using their fingers and thumbs.
Appreciate the sensible response, however it might be worth me explaining a bit more.

A lad I know is serving currently and is attempting to apply for a commission from the ranks, and is currently top third on the Sqn grading board and holds a Law Degree.

His CoC are arbitrarily denying him the signature on the form he needs to be able to apply for a commission (although his troop commander has been very supportive)

I would like to read the official, documented process (specifically any appeals process or rights he may or may not have) in order to be able to help him out.

Also why I don’t want opinions, as he needs to quote a DIN or QRs and not Tony O being a cockwomble on ARRSE.

I commissioned in 2005 so I’m aware of the general terms and conditions however realise that over the last 15 years the paperwork may have changed.
 
@Oxygen_Thief

Done a little digging on DG. I am struggling to finds an actual DIN/ABN or similar - probably been defaulted to OS and therefore can't go onto DG...

However, the rules are in : Conditions governing the grant of commissions in the Land Forces are contained in the Army Commissioning Regulations 1999 (AC 13452).

Therefore shouldn't have changed since 1999. I'm not on a MoD machine at the minute and won't be for a little while, so worth a look on there for a more definitive answer, or speak to the Clerk/RCMO?
 
@plant_life posted this on here a couple of years ago. Doesn't answer all you asked but it could be a start, especially how it progresses:

1. Education at GCSE level. Soldier POs must follow the same guidelines at GCSE level as their civilian entry counterparts; further or higher education, although desirable, is not required. GCSE requirements are thus:
a. 35 ALIS points or above (34 for SCEs)[1] from 7 GCSE/SCE subjects.
b. Minimum grade C/2 in English Language.
c. Minimum grade C/2 in Mathematics.
d. Minimum grade C/2 in either a science or a foreign language.
N.B. It should be noted that this is the minimum standard. ‘A’ levels and higher education give better potential; in particular ‘A’ levels may qualify them for an in-service degree[2]. Direct entrants will have an advantage in this area over those commissioning from the ranks.
2. Time Served. 2 years’ service must be completed in the ranks by the time they attend AOSB Main Board. This allows DM(A) to waiver the requirement to achieve UCAS points (used to calculate achievement at AS and A2 level) in addition to completing trade qualifications.
3. Age. The individual must be at RMAS by their 29th birthday. The selection and admittance process for serving soldiers is typically 6-12 months, but more time should be allowed. Individuals should be identified as early as possible.


[1] ALIS points from GCSEs: A* = 8, A = 7, B = 6, C = 5, D = 4, E = 3, F = 2, G = 1, U = 0

Potential Officer Process
1. The 9-stage process is explained below: however the soldier should concurrently register for an online officer profile on www.army.mod.uk ‘click’ JOIN.
a. Stage 1 - Identification/Interviews. Once eligibility is confirmed as above, the AFB 227 (Report on Candidate for Officer Training in Enclosure Link A) is to be filled out alongside interviews with OC and CO (or equivalent).

(i)Background study. As an ongoing process, the soldier should be developed as follows:
(1) Separation from soldier peers. If required, the unit chain of command may wish to separate the individual from routine soldier life. An example would be central employment (CO’s driver, Offrs’ Mess) or any position allowing for character and professional development, such as running AT packages or gaining extra AT instructional qualifications.
(2) Current affairs. ‘Reading in’ of newspapers/journals and joining organisations such as RUSI are expected.
(3) Essays. Relevant essay titles should be set and marked by a professional (i.e. an RMAS academic with the relevant qualifications and experience) rather than chain of command. These should be kept on file.
(4) Planning exercises. AOSB planning exercises are readily available on the internet (via Google search); ERLS have run sessions akin to that of the AOSB environment.
(5) Fitness. Individuals should be robust and fitter than the majority of their peers. Injury management/avoidance becomes important once selection draws near.
(6) Other preparation. The individual should also brush up on Corps history. Any extra-curricular development such as community work (Prince’s Trust) is recommended. Character should be worked on throughout.
Note: Once stage 1 is complete the soldier must then register for an officers profile online. This can be done by clicking ‘join’ on the www.army.mod.uk website. The Candidate will be asked to update service and academic history and they will be allocated a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) who works in the National Recruitment Centre (NRC).

b. Stage 2 – Medical. A full Pulhheems should be undertaken and faxed to the AOSB Medical Centre.
c. Stage 3 – Documentation. The following documents should be sent to RE Rec, as a flag brief, in order:

(i)AFB 227 Report on Candidate for Officer Training. Complete by OC and CO. Note that this form expires 12 months after completion and therefore it should be completed only if the soldier is ready to progress through the selection process.
(ii) Previous SJARs and Course Reports. Showing firm recommendation for commission.
(iii) Proof of Education. GCSE/’A’ level certificates plus any others.
(iv) Any other supporting evidence. Citations, essays, recommendations or notable achievements.
a. Stage 4 – Capbadge Specific Potential Officer Familiarisation visit (OFV) and Corps Colonel Interview. As soon as practicable, the soldier is to attend the OFV.
(i) Welcome. They will be welcomed and briefed by capbadge specific recruiting staff before the main visit commences. The recruiting staff will check all documentation is accurate.
(ii) OFV. The first day is particularly important to learn the career structure and responsibilities of an officer. The second day will focus on the wider opportunities within the Corps and give the recruiting staff the opportunity to informally interview the soldier candidates.
(iii) Col interview. During the OFV they will need to pass an interview with Capbadge Col. This will be arranged by the recruiting staff. The subsequent recommendation will form Part 3 of their AF B227. This will then be sent electronically to the candidates Candidate Support Manager in the National Recruiting Centre.
b. Stage 5 - AOSB Briefing. Once the AFB227 is complete the candidate is then ready to go forward to the AOSBB. The soldiers Candidate Support Manager will book an AOSBB and forward an AOSB CV for the candidate to fill in and send directly to AOSB.
Stage 6 – Potential Officer Development Course (PODC). Almost all serving soldiers will need to attend, based at the Army School of Education in Worthy Down. The individual will be loaded on to the next course once AOSB Briefing has been passed.


a. Stage 7 - AOSB Main Board. The individual will be loaded on to the next course once PODC has been passed. Should they fail Main Board, they will be deferred for 12 months until their second and final attempt.
b. Stage 8 – RMAS Entry. If successful at AOSB Main Board, soldiers have a place in reserve and will typically attend the next RMAS intake, even if it is on the Sunday after Main Board. If there is time, all will attend the Pre Commissioning Course Briefing Course (PCCBC). Soldiers should be given an assignment order to RMAS and if there are any administrative issues, the unit RCMO should arrange an assignment order via APC.
c. Stage 9 – Commissioning Course and Arms Selection Board. Once at RMAS, there is no obligation to re-join your original capbadge.

The ALIS scores are now mandatory as there were quite a few officers getting through because they had a third class honours degree in yak hair basket weaving but could barely write their own name and count to 10 using their fingers and thumbs.
Thank God for the LE route.
 

Oxygen_Thief

On ROPS
On ROPs
@Oxygen_Thief

Done a little digging on DG. I am struggling to finds an actual DIN/ABN or similar - probably been defaulted to OS and therefore can't go onto DG...

However, the rules are in : Conditions governing the grant of commissions in the Land Forces are contained in the Army Commissioning Regulations 1999 (AC 13452).

Therefore shouldn't have changed since 1999. I'm not on a MoD machine at the minute and won't be for a little while, so worth a look on there for a more definitive answer, or speak to the Clerk/RCMO?
Thanks Olaf, appreciate the response.

Sadly, I’m a horrible civvie now so I don’t have access to clerks/RCMO

The lad in question had his RCMO interview cancelled by the 2ic - who by all accounts is being unhelpful/obstructive
 
Thanks Olaf, appreciate the response.

Sadly, I’m a horrible civvie now so I don’t have access to clerks/RCMO

The lad in question had his RCMO interview cancelled by the 2ic - who by all accounts is being unhelpful/obstructive
If I was him (and I'm not, being a bolshie commissioned type), I'd phone the RCMO up and ask why. If the answer is BS ask for a new date/time.

I'd potentially drop 'service complaint' into the call, casually, in passing.

However, for the lad in question, a safer route might be his Tp Comd. doing the above - it is the Tp Comds job to manage his soldiers careers after-all.

And Bn/Rgt or Coy/Sqn 2IC? Why is the TWIC being difficult, is there something that would trip him up/show the unit up if he goes forward or is it personal?
 

Oxygen_Thief

On ROPS
On ROPs
If I was him (and I'm not, being a bolshie commissioned type), I'd phone the RCMO up and ask why. If the answer is BS ask for a new date/time.

I'd potentially drop 'service complaint' into the call, casually, in passing.

However, for the lad in question, a safer route might be his Tp Comd. doing the above - it is the Tp Comds job to manage his soldiers careers after-all.

And Bn/Rgt or Coy/Sqn 2IC? Why is the TWIC being difficult, is there something that would trip him up/show the unit up if he goes forward or is it personal?
Sqn 2ic - I did mention using a service complaint if he gets no joy/reasonable explanation for denying his application.

There was a comment about his leadership ability (which could be gen) however I find it strange as 1. Sandhurst is there to train him up and 2. They rated him in the top third as an NCO, clearly can’t be completely hopeless if they’ve rated him top third.

He is 27 at the moment so he is on the verge of being too old if he can’t get an application in soon - the process usually takes at least 12-18 months

I get the impression the 2ic just doesn’t want the hassle (having been a Sqn 2ic myself).

I’ll point him to the docs you mentioned though, he needs the definitive answer in his back pocket before kicking up a fuss
 
Sqn 2ic - I did mention using a service complaint if he gets no joy/reasonable explanation for denying his application.

There was a comment about his leadership ability (which could be gen) however I find it strange as 1. Sandhurst is there to train him up and 2. They rated him in the top third as an NCO, clearly can’t be completely hopeless if they’ve rated him top third.

He is 27 at the moment so he is on the verge of being too old if he can’t get an application in soon - the process usually takes at least 12-18 months

I get the impression the 2ic just doesn’t want the hassle (having been a Sqn 2ic myself).

I’ll point him to the docs you mentioned though, he needs the definitive answer in his back pocket before kicking up a fuss
Hmmm - given it is SJAR time around now - exact current rank dependant - I'd be looking very closely at my 'leadership' related ratings. If there are none below average, then I'd be asking some fairly pointed questions. I'd alos look at the 'commission' box...

It isn't that much work to put someone forward to AOSB, especially for the Sqn 2IC - once he gets through to AOSB it all becomes the RCMOs problem.

Best bet is to get the Tp Comd to check the rules, maybe have a chat with the RCMO and poke it that way. If it is the Sqn 2IC then he needs to explain why to the Tp Comd, with evidence and reasoning, so that it can be passed on.
 
Apologies if in the incorrect place, but does anyone have current DIN or regulations for commissioning from the ranks?

Ideally need to know the current application process, and if it’s possible to redress/appeal if the CoC decide to arbitrarily stop you from applying

(And no, it’s not for me - I’m far too old for that now).

Edit: please don’t post opinions, I’d like to see the actual written rules or process.
The rules you need are in Army Commissioning Regulations 2017. They have been updated since the 1999 version.

The relevant para to your query seems to be this part:

“Application procedure

3.1.003. Applications are to be submitted to the NRC in accordance with Chapter 1 Part 4, via www.army.mod.uk/jobs who will subsequently allocate a Candidate Support Manager (CSM). If an applicant has been provisionally accepted by an RAC or infantry regiment before their application is submitted, they are to say so. The applicant’s CO is to give their recommendation on a AF B227 on the Arm or Service for which he considers the applicant suitable, completed AF B227 are to be submitted to the allocated CSM. Procedures for AAC are covered in Chapter 6 Part 1 and applications for the RAMC (Medical Support Officer) should be processed through HQ AMS.”

Regrettably, there is nothing about complaints or appeals if the CoC are not supportive. If that is the case, I would suggest a Service Complaint could be considered.
 
Linky no worky, however searching for ABN13452 will work - its an oddity of DG that linking often doesn't work well.
Ah, ‘‘tis still better than a single dusty copy held in RHQ behind the Adjutants desk beneath a dog eared copy of Horse and Hound.

Kids these days, etc...
 

halloumikid

Old-Salt
One of the ideas of ‘Maximising Talent’ is to remove the hurdle of the CO’s support until after Briefing. Soldiers will need to inform their CoC that they are applying, but not need permission to do so. Too many applications are stimied apparently.
 

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