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CSE - Comm Sys Eng - Communication Systems Engineer... how does it compare?

#1
Morning All,

I've been searching through the forum for any posts with 'CSE', 'Comm Sys Eng' and 'Communication Systems Engineer' in them - some good info has been found, but a lot of it seems a bit outdated now.

As it stands I am looking to re-enlist as a Communications System Engineer having previously been binned from Phase 1 on medical grounds. Sadly, I am now almost too old to re-join so the regulars may not be something that I am able to get into again and I'll have to go reserves instead. Sh!t bust, but what can you do?

My question then relates to the Phase 2 element of the CSE role. Can anyone that is either currently at Blandford, (either in Phase 2 or as an instructor) or anyone who has recently passed their phase 2 there give me an idea of what the training entails. What civvie quals does it include/mirror? Essentially, what route would I take in civvie street to end up in the same kind of role?

If I'm not able to joins the regs, I am considering retraining and moving into a network/sys admin role anyway as it holds a lot of interest for me.
 
#2
Phase Two CSE training gives a soldier the fundamental knowledge needed in order to begin administrating, maintaining and engineering a wide range of communication systems. It doesn't offer (to my knowledge) any civvie quals, or mirror to anything specific in civvie street... unless "generic radio/satcomms/computer apprentice" really exists. Maybe if McDonalds needed someone to retune their telly or reboot a cash register perhaps.

Once you've completed a few years and gained hands-on experience across a couple of units, you can return to Blandford for Phase 3 training, ie; qualify as a Class 1 CSE. This course gives you the opportunity to gain a Foundation Degree in Comms System Engineering from Bournemouth University, and provides more than sufficient training for the student to pass CCNA, ITIL Foundation and several Microsoft modules, should they wish to pay for the exams in their own time out of their SLCs or own pocket.
 
#4
Evening chaps,

Thanks for your responses.

BW - that makes sense and I'd say it does almost mirror the civvie alternative inasmuch as to start from scratch you have to learn the basic fundamentals, get experience and then look to go down the cert route.

Out of curiosity, is there an average time taken to reach class 1 - is it purely down to getting the years/experience under your belt or is it something that is more aptitude based?

TT - I'd seen that that was the case with the reserves. CS op would be the way I went if the regs doesn't pan out quickly enough.

The more I read about the CS Eng role, the more it seems like something that I'd like to pursue either way - Army or Civvie.

Thanks again, I hope your information proves to be useful for anyone else looking into the role from a similar POV - I think I've used enough tags to make it as easy as possible for the post to show up in the simplest of searches!
 
#5
Out of curiosity, is there an average time taken to reach class 1 - is it purely down to getting the years/experience under your belt or is it something that is more aptitude based?
Not really. S'posedly 4-5 years, but can be as early as 3, or as late as 10.

It should be to do with aptitude BASED ON experience... but you'll get the occasionally twerp come off their Class 1 course, have 11-12 years under their belt and still be an utter ******* wage/oxygen thief.
 
#6
At your age I would probably go down the route of night school / open uni whilst working. The phase 2 training is ok but very broad. On completion you could get posted to a unit and never see any IS stuff.

Class 1 course is between the 5 and 7 year point usually and lasts for 13 months. The Cisco and Microsoft is good the rest of the time is pointless. You then have a 2 year return of service on completion. So very roughly you will be committing 8 years to get to a point you can massively surpass in 3 years studying ccna, ccnp and juniper.

To go further with your career, you can start looking at Foreman level. You need to have done 10 years service with a strong recommend to Sgt (I personally can see this changing as interest in Supervisor is diminishing). The course is another 18 months /2 years with another 3 year return of service. Also you currently get put on the Foreman course of their choosing not yours. So working it all out on my abacus that would be a total return of service of at least 15 years. This is the earliest point you can get out.

Hope this helps. Probably not what you would expect but I am not going to lie.
 
#18
He hasn't. He was trying to insinuate CLS, EDs and Ins Techs were involved in the discussion.

What about 81 sigs? They're all traded ad Ins Techs aren't they?
I was just referring to what you stated about Royal signal Reserves, you claimed the Royal Signals Reserve only has CS Ops.

All I stated was that was in correct and infact there is also Tele mech Reserve's.
 
#19
I was just referring to what you stated about Royal signal Reserves, you claimed the Royal Signals Reserve only has CS Ops.

All I stated was that was in correct and infact there is also Tele mech Reserve's.
If you look at the conversation, muggles weren't really commented upon. It was a discussion about CS Engs and what he could do with his skills should he join the reserve, ie become a CS Op.

ie Regs have CS Ops AND CS Engrs, Res only have CS Ops. Other trades weren't commented upon, had he asked about them in his OP, or later, then I would have clarified.

R'tard.
 

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