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Crystal sets, POW radios, spy sets & radio related thread

not sure it would have been 39-47

Probably this place: Post Office Research Station - Wikipedia

Amongst other things responsible for:
Moved to Martlesham in 1975.
 
I have had an RSP1 SDR Play for some time. It is excellent for hunting the radio spectrum. It has a few issues, including selectivity and image channels appearing all over the spectrum . but I believe that most of these have been cleared up in the newer version. You do have to have a semi quick PC to use these, I found my cheap and cheerful laptop struggled with it running SDR Play. I would not hesitate to recommend this device to those interested in exploring the RF Bands. I intend to get the latest version sometime soon.
 
I have had an RSP1 SDR Play for some time. It is excellent for hunting the radio spectrum. It has a few issues, including selectivity and image channels appearing all over the spectrum . but I believe that most of these have been cleared up in the newer version. You do have to have a semi quick PC to use these, I found my cheap and cheerful laptop struggled with it running SDR Play. I would not hesitate to recommend this device to those interested in exploring the RF Bands. I intend to get the latest version sometime soon.

Second potentially daft question on this thread.

With all of these various radio receivers what do you actually listen to and (supplementary question Mr Speaker) what radio stations do you pick up.

Apart from the geek aspect (and I am no stranger to geekdom) what do these gizmos give you that the various internet radio options don't?
 

endure

GCM
With the SDRPlay radios you can listen to anything from 1Khz to 2GHz so basically any radio signal transmitted assuming you have the right antenna and software to decode any exotica.

An easy starter is broadcast radio whether it's long or medium wave from across Europe. Remember how Radio Luxembourg used to come blatting up over the horizon as darkness fell? You could spend your time trying to hear all the other European stations after dark.

There's all the shortwave stations round the world you can try and hear.

They give you the satisfaction of realising that the only connection between you and the other end is the atmosphere. No broadband, no wires, no monthly charges, just the ionosphere, just the electrons doing their dance. It's truly magic.

I've been listening to China Radio International's Beijing transmitter tonight and also the Voice of Turkey from Emirler.

Here's a site where you can conduct searches of all the HF stations on air around the world that are on air at any time



E2A just listened to the news in English from Voice of Iran.
China Radio International broadcasting in Serbian from Xinyiang
 
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Second potentially daft question on this thread.

With all of these various radio receivers what do you actually listen to and (supplementary question Mr Speaker) what radio stations do you pick up.

Apart from the geek aspect (and I am no stranger to geekdom) what do these gizmos give you that the various internet radio options don't?

I get most of the fun trying out different bits of string and filters, band pass and band stop to aid reception. Using internet radios you can be limited by the people running them. I get some joy from picking up military frequencies which are seldom covered by internet radio stations.
I am also interested in propagation changes throughout the day and the year. A little geekish I know but I have enormous fun designing antenna systems and sometimes getting good results.
 
As antenna wires have been brought up a few times, thought would ask this. Where I live has a washing line made of plastic coated wire (probably cheap steel), could that be used as an antenna? Same goes for the wiring in the smock hoods (some are coated copper) if they were relayed/fused together.
 
As antenna wires have been brought up a few times, thought would ask this. Where I live has a washing line made of plastic coated wire (probably cheap steel), could that be used as an antenna? Same goes for the wiring in the smock hoods (some are coated copper) if they were relayed/fused together.
You can tune up the gutters of your house if need be (as a mate of mine has done). Just need a decent antennna tuner and you should be laughing.

As a demonstration a few years back, the same mate also tuned up a piece of wet string. Had one end in a bucket of water and the other end plugged into the centre coax pin on the radio. It worked (not well for transmitting, but we could hear audio no problems)
 
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endure

GCM
A Ruski R/O on watch ;-)

ruski.jpg
 

endure

GCM
As antenna wires have been brought up a few times, thought would ask this. Where I live has a washing line made of plastic coated wire (probably cheap steel), could that be used as an antenna? Same goes for the wiring in the smock hoods (some are coated copper) if they were relayed/fused together.


Steel cored washing line is a sneaky beak way of amateur radio transmitting if you live next door to someone who doesn't understand that every garden ought to have an 80 foot tower in it ;-)
 

endure

GCM
The new SDR may have to wait. I've just found a small but perfectly formed (and quite cheap) transceiver that looks the biz.

It is made in China but so are Iphones ;-)

The Chinese are making some nifty little QRP kit at the moment.

 
You can tune up the gutters of your house if need be (as a mate of mine has done). Just need a decent antennna tuner and you should be laughing.

As a demonstration a few years back, the same mate also tuned up a piece of wet string. Had one end in a bucket of water and the other end plugged into the centre coax pin on the radio. It worked (not well for transmitting, but we could hear audio no problems)
I've used a few random things as antennas with mixed results. On my FofS course I did a project using a 12x12 frame as an antenna in loads of different ways: Straight end-fed, dipole array with insulated centre-couplers and soaking the canvas in water. It worked both ways from Blandford to Scotland, but the VSWR was shocking. The conclusion of the report was that "As an antenna it makes a really good tent frame."

Also once used a solid wire fence panel, laid flat on the ground, as a NVIS antenna and it worked out to about 120Km with a 20W transmitter. Most things work if they are metal, but as I said, they are not necessarily efficiently distributing or emitting the transmit power you put in to them.

This sort of thing but a bit bigger.

wire fence panel.jpg
 

endure

GCM
I've used a few random things as antennas with mixed results. On my FofS course I did a project using a 12x12 frame as an antenna in loads of different ways: Straight end-fed, dipole array with insulated centre-couplers and soaking the canvas in water. It worked both ways from Blandford to Scotland, but the VSWR was shocking. The conclusion of the report was that "As an antenna it makes a really good tent frame."

Also once used a solid wire fence panel, laid flat on the ground, as a NVIS antenna and it worked out to about 120Km with a 20W transmitter. Most things work if they are metal, but as I said, they are not necessarily efficiently distributing or emitting the transmit power you put in to them.

This sort of thing but a bit bigger.

View attachment 502971


I've got one of those at the bottom of my garden. It's tempting to try and tune it up but there's a primary school playing field on the other side of it and I'd hate to dip and load an 8 year old to resonance.
 
I've got one of those at the bottom of my garden. It's tempting to try and tune it up but there's a primary school playing field on the other side of it and I'd hate to dip and load an 8 year old to resonance.
I've noticed that they quite often run above concrete footings and the posts are made of composite resin. Has to be worth a try.
 
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I've got one of those at the bottom of my garden. It's tempting to try and tune it up but there's a primary school playing field on the other side of it and I'd hate to dip and load an 8 year old to resonance.

Meh. They're expendable, there'll be loads more in the same classroom :)
 
The new SDR may have to wait. I've just found a small but perfectly formed (and quite cheap) transceiver that looks the biz.

It is made in China but so are Iphones ;-)

The Chinese are making some nifty little QRP kit at the moment.

Gen question - I'm presuming you have a ham licence - What would the reaction / response be if a non-ham licenced person bought one of those and attempted to converse with others on various channels?

Somewhere or another I'm licensed on aeronautical freqs but...I doubt I can just tune into Heathrow ground and give it "One Nine for a copy" :)
 

endure

GCM
Gen question - I'm presuming you have a ham licence - What would the reaction / response be if a non-ham licenced person bought one of those and attempted to converse with others on various channels?

Somewhere or another I'm licensed on aeronautical freqs but...I doubt I can just tune into Heathrow ground and give it "One Nine for a copy" :)

The Wireless Telegraphy Act 2006 gives the official answer although they have to catch you first...

"
35Unauthorised use etc of wireless telegraphy station or apparatus

(1)A person commits an offence if he contravenes section 8.

(2)A person who commits an offence under this section consisting in the establishment or use of a wireless telegraphy station, or the installation or use of wireless telegraphy apparatus, for the purpose of making a broadcast is liable—

(a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to both;

(b)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years or to a fine or to both.

(3)In the application of subsection (2) to Scotland or Northern Ireland the reference to 12 months is to be read as a reference to six months.

(4)A person who commits an offence under this section consisting in the installation or use of receiving apparatus is liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale.

(5)A person who commits an offence under this section other than one falling within subsection (2) or (4) is liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 51 weeks or to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale or to both.

(6)In the application of subsection (5) to Scotland or Northern Ireland the reference to 51 weeks is to be read as a reference to six months.

(7)In this section “broadcast” has the same meaning as in Part 5.
 

endure

GCM
If they really want you they'll set the Ofcom Monitoring Station at Baldock on you. Baldock has sneaky beaky stuff all over the country that can intercept any radio transmission.

Up until 3 years ago the technical manager there was the man who taught me morse in 1972.
 
If they really want you they'll set the Ofcom Monitoring Station at Baldock on you. Baldock has sneaky beaky stuff all over the country that can intercept any radio transmission.

Up until 3 years ago the technical manager there was the man who taught me morse in 1972.

I was referring mainly to the attitude of the 'users' of those freqs. Not that I'm planning on it but...what would their likely reaction be if somebody without a designated callsign tried to conversate / get a radio check on a ham freq be?

I had a CB for a bit when I was maybe 15 (Harrier CBX and magmount aerial on a biscuit tin) and can remember the fun...and carnage that that was. Friday nights on there listening when everyone got back from the pub was quite amusing. I'm guessing there is no equivilent on hamfreqs?

Never had any issues in the ops room when bored during a middle watch calling up random aircraft on 121.5/243 for a radio check.
 

endure

GCM
I was referring mainly to the attitude of the 'users' of those freqs. Not that I'm planning on it but...what would their likely reaction be if somebody without a designated callsign tried to converstae / get a radio check on a ham freq be?

I had a CB for a bit when I was maybe 15 and can remember the fun...and carnage that that was. Friday nights on there listening when everyone got back from the pub was quite amusing. I'm guessing there is no equivilent on hamfreqs?


They'd hand you your arse on a plate. What you have to realise is that the amateur wavebands are largely populated by grumpy old men. If you went on air without a callsign it would be like Friday night on arrse.
 
They'd hand you your arse on a plate. What you have to realise is that the amateur wavebands are largely populated by grumpy old men. If you went on air without a callsign it would be like Friday night on arrse.
Have just been listening to CH19 on cb from an sdr in Cheshire


By God they seem special!
 

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