CrossFit

#1
anybody had a go?
 
#2
Yes mate, its banging.

I used to do cross fit and Krav Maga combined.

You will feel like your lungs are about to collapse and you won't be able to get out of bed the following day, but it's all good.

The website is really good to if you want to compile your own workout.
 
#3
i've found a club that runs classes near by so might give it a blast.
 
#4
Mate seriously it's excellent.

It's designed to push you to your limit, but you will notice improvements very very quickly.
 
#5
to work outs look stupidly easy on the web site, and you do think "is that it" but you will be smashed into the floor! it took me weeks to do a full work out to the letter!
 
#7
Ian1983 said:
Crossfit is over rated.


A mis mash of exercises with no clear progression.
i agree its not the bee all and end all of training, but if you want to throw in a work out every now and again its a fast hard work out with min kit!

i prob only do one a week at the most, just to keep things diff
 
#8
Fair enough

I quite like ross enamait's training protcals, or that of Joel from 8 weeks out.

Both have different approaches.
Ross is fighter orientated. He is also a walk the walk kind of person. 34 and can coast running 5 miles in 30 minutes and can deadlift 200+ kg.
Joel is a scientific approach, you do this, your body adapts by doing this, the net result is this.

Both complement each other. And both help you reach a desired goal
 
#9
Well at the mo unfortunately im off work with laryngitis so no training for about or week so ive decided to look at all the posibilities for a training programme for the last 3 months before i start basic. Obviously im going to be running 3-5 miles 3 times a week, also i do thaiboxing so will be training 2-3 times a week in that. Just looking at other options, probably some upper body work maybe.
 
#11
exnorthener said:
Ian1983 said:
Crossfit is over rated.


A mis mash of exercises with no clear progression.
i agree its not the bee all and end all of training, but if you want to throw in a work out every now and again its a fast hard work out with min kit!

i prob only do one a week at the most, just to keep things diff

You obviously weren't pushing yourselves hard enough.

I don't understand how you can call it a "mis mash of exercises" it's a total body workout that should get you anaerobic (if you do it right). You will get much quicker results that the gym monkeys relentlessly pushing out bench presses and tricep extensions.
 
#12
NigG said:
I don't understand how you can call it a "mis mash of exercises" it's a total body workout that should get you anaerobic (if you do it right). You will get much quicker results that the gym monkeys relentlessly pushing out bench presses and tricep extensions.
Lots of high rep training is great for improving your anarobic and aerobic capacity, but is not good for building strength.

Cross fit is good for building fast twitch muscle fibes which are good for explosive power, and good for body building with sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. Strength training is the (usually) vainity free form of weight training which serves the purpose of actual building strength rather than just getting pumped up through high repetition work outs.

There is of course remit for both. Not everyone who lifts weight is a gym monkey.
 
#13
Milesy said:
NigG said:
I don't understand how you can call it a "mis mash of exercises" it's a total body workout that should get you anaerobic (if you do it right). You will get much quicker results that the gym monkeys relentlessly pushing out bench presses and tricep extensions.
Lots of high rep training is great for improving your anarobic and aerobic capacity, but is not good for building strength.

Cross fit is good for building fast twitch muscle fibes which are good for explosive power, and good for body building with sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. Strength training is the (usually) vainity free form of weight training which serves the purpose of actual building strength rather than just getting pumped up through high repetition work outs.

There is of course remit for both. Not everyone who lifts weight is a gym monkey.
Agreed, workouts should be varied and I think a good 'Olympic set' once a week is generally useful.

I still maintain though that a couple of Crossfit workouts a week are far better than 5 sessions of bicep curls, etc.
 
#14
NigG said:
I still maintain though that a couple of Crossfit workouts a week are far better than 5 sessions of bicep curls, etc.
That statement shows how little you know about proper strength training - bicep curls are for bodybuilders, the walts of the gym.

Cardio-weight circuits are great if your goals are cardio fitness & muscle stamina; and yes, they would be better than body-building workouts where the aim is bulk as opposed to strength. However, strength training has great benefits also and should not be knocked. They can complement each other greatly.
 
#15
eSeL said:
NigG said:
I still maintain though that a couple of Crossfit workouts a week are far better than 5 sessions of bicep curls, etc.
That statement shows how little you know about proper strength training - bicep curls are for bodybuilders, the walts of the gym.

Cardio-weight circuits are great if your goals are cardio fitness & muscle stamina; and yes, they would be better than body-building workouts where the aim is bulk as opposed to strength. However, strength training has great benefits also and should not be knocked. They can complement each other greatly.
]

Not quite sure what you mean by that. Have you even read what I've written here?

If my sarcasm wasn't immediately obvious then let me spell it out for you.

Both the paragraphs you've written there are exactly what I've been saying i.e. a good range of exercise incorporating aerobic, anaerobic, strength training, etc.

Let me make one thing absolutely straight, I have no issue with strength training (this is also one of the major components of Crossfit). My issue is with people who train for looks e.g. bodybuilders, hence the 'Bicep curls' statement.

www.crossfit.com here’s the website. familiarise your self and stop writing bone posts
 
#16
NigG said:
eSeL said:
NigG said:
I still maintain though that a couple of Crossfit workouts a week are far better than 5 sessions of bicep curls, etc.
That statement shows how little you know about proper strength training - bicep curls are for bodybuilders, the walts of the gym.

Cardio-weight circuits are great if your goals are cardio fitness & muscle stamina; and yes, they would be better than body-building workouts where the aim is bulk as opposed to strength. However, strength training has great benefits also and should not be knocked. They can complement each other greatly.
]

Not quite sure what you mean by that. Have you even read what I've written here?

If my sarcasm wasn't immediately obvious then let me spell it out for you.

Both the paragraphs you've written there are exactly what I've been saying i.e. a good range of exercise incorporating aerobic, anaerobic, strength training, etc.

Let me make one thing absolutely straight, I have no issue with strength training (this is also one of the major components of Crossfit). My issue is with people who train for looks e.g. bodybuilders, hence the 'Bicep curls' statement.

www.crossfit.com here’s the website. familiarise your self and stop writing bone posts
Sorry, I've been away on work, hence the delay in my response (which will be rushed at the moment).

My view point is that cross fit, while it does indeed knacker you out, has no progression from month to month.
For example, I know they have work of of the days everyday. Now, each day doesn't build on from the previous day, they just seem to pick exercises and rep ranges and everyone tries to beat everyone elses time.

From a adaptive pov, the work outs don't seem to be focusing on one key area to work on.
You cannot train efficiently by attacking multiple training aspects at once (well, you can in the beginning due to the body being blank template).
Endurance is being targeted, strength is not, aerobic capacity cannot be stressed with sufficient volume due to loads used being too high (as in the muscular endurance is not sufficient to keep the loads moving for 30-45 minutes).
If tonnage per minute say was incorporated it would be easier to track progression (but then you could also bring into HR and dictate rest intervals on HR).

In the message of mine you quoted results. Yes, you will get aerobic and anaerobic results quite quickly. That's to be expected as your quickly achieving a high HR and sustaining that for a relatively prolonged period. But training isn't about a quick fix (or shouldn't be). It's a marathon not a sprint.

You in a later post also mentioned olympic lifts.
Very good for explosiveness and power, never ever designed for high repetition work which crossfit seem to like. The nature of OL lifts is taxing to the CNS and more importantly the tendons. Form deteriorates with exhaustion which GREATLY increases the likelihood of injury.

You mentioned crossfit as being great for strength. Not really. It's good at increasing overal work capacity, but so are a lot of things. Most of these allow you to quantify how you've progressed. For example sledge hammer swinging for time, you can vary working loads by getting bigger or smaller heads, you can perform volume training, density training, calculate how much much tonnage you've shifted in a given time (that's another way of say density training though).
Strength can only be increased via working close to your 1 rep max. That's not body builder training (your example being a curl), that's power lifter training which taxes the CNS more then sarcoplasm (being the bulk, which is trained predominately through higher repetition isolational exercises). Powerlifters train lifts that tax the whole body (hence great CNS activation).
To a certain extent, you can think of a body builder as being a muscle group medium distance runner, while a power lifter as a whole body sprinter.

I do personally incorporate 2 circuit based training sessions a week as a way of increasing my general work capacity and ability to work at high HR's, but they are after I have done low rep, high weight deadlifts or squats and a accompanying upperbody lift and assistance work.

The crossfit website is indeed impressive, it's marketing is very well focused.
 
#17
Ian1983 said:
NigG said:
eSeL said:
NigG said:
I still maintain though that a couple of Crossfit workouts a week are far better than 5 sessions of bicep curls, etc.
That statement shows how little you know about proper strength training - bicep curls are for bodybuilders, the walts of the gym.

Cardio-weight circuits are great if your goals are cardio fitness & muscle stamina; and yes, they would be better than body-building workouts where the aim is bulk as opposed to strength. However, strength training has great benefits also and should not be knocked. They can complement each other greatly.
]

Not quite sure what you mean by that. Have you even read what I've written here?

If my sarcasm wasn't immediately obvious then let me spell it out for you.

Both the paragraphs you've written there are exactly what I've been saying i.e. a good range of exercise incorporating aerobic, anaerobic, strength training, etc.

Let me make one thing absolutely straight, I have no issue with strength training (this is also one of the major components of Crossfit). My issue is with people who train for looks e.g. bodybuilders, hence the 'Bicep curls' statement.

www.crossfit.com here’s the website. familiarise your self and stop writing bone posts
Sorry, I've been away on work, hence the delay in my response (which will be rushed at the moment).

My view point is that cross fit, while it does indeed knacker you out, has no progression from month to month.
For example, I know they have work of of the days everyday. Now, each day doesn't build on from the previous day, they just seem to pick exercises and rep ranges and everyone tries to beat everyone elses time.

From a adaptive pov, the work outs don't seem to be focusing on one key area to work on.
You cannot train efficiently by attacking multiple training aspects at once (well, you can in the beginning due to the body being blank template).
Endurance is being targeted, strength is not, aerobic capacity cannot be stressed with sufficient volume due to loads used being too high (as in the muscular endurance is not sufficient to keep the loads moving for 30-45 minutes).
If tonnage per minute say was incorporated it would be easier to track progression (but then you could also bring into HR and dictate rest intervals on HR).

In the message of mine you quoted results. Yes, you will get aerobic and anaerobic results quite quickly. That's to be expected as your quickly achieving a high HR and sustaining that for a relatively prolonged period. But training isn't about a quick fix (or shouldn't be). It's a marathon not a sprint.

You in a later post also mentioned olympic lifts.
Very good for explosiveness and power, never ever designed for high repetition work which crossfit seem to like. The nature of OL lifts is taxing to the CNS and more importantly the tendons. Form deteriorates with exhaustion which GREATLY increases the likelihood of injury.

You mentioned crossfit as being great for strength. Not really. It's good at increasing overal work capacity, but so are a lot of things. Most of these allow you to quantify how you've progressed. For example sledge hammer swinging for time, you can vary working loads by getting bigger or smaller heads, you can perform volume training, density training, calculate how much much tonnage you've shifted in a given time (that's another way of say density training though).
Strength can only be increased via working close to your 1 rep max. That's not body builder training (your example being a curl), that's power lifter training which taxes the CNS more then sarcoplasm (being the bulk, which is trained predominately through higher repetition isolational exercises). Powerlifters train lifts that tax the whole body (hence great CNS activation).
To a certain extent, you can think of a body builder as being a muscle group medium distance runner, while a power lifter as a whole body sprinter.

I do personally incorporate 2 circuit based training sessions a week as a way of increasing my general work capacity and ability to work at high HR's, but they are after I have done low rep, high weight deadlifts or squats and a accompanying upperbody lift and assistance work.

The crossfit website is indeed impressive, it's marketing is very well focused.
Point taken. I've been quite bias towards Crossfit on here, but I take your point on the progression element of the work outs.
 
#18
I do appreciate Crossfit seems to have a bit of a cult status and people can be drawn into it.

Best antidote is looking around at similar methods that have different takes on things (and don't charge you £1000 for a 8 hour seminar so that you can franchise yourself out).

I'm inclined towards ross enamait, a youtube of himself training is here; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9hk9z1YVcE&feature=player_embedded

His website is http://www.rosstraining.com/. His forum is very good and you'll note he goes on there to answer peoples questions quite regularly.

I'm inclined towards him, but there are a lot of other trainers that focus on other things.
http://www.8weeksout.com/ is a good website for a different p.o.v to training adaptions (has a decent forum but the guy who runs the site does have a book to sell, just as a disclaimer).
 
#19
Your not wrong mate, very pricey.

I don't think you can go far wrong with some basic Kettlebell exercises and Tabata sequences.
 
#20
Depends on your weaknesses.

If you can't operate at high HR's, yeah, I would agree to a certain extent.

But most people have a habit of going balls out everytime they train, which levels off the adaption pretty quickly (although firstly it can lead to adrenal fatique).
That's something I've been reading about lately after the guy from 8weeksout gained my interest in the subject.

I think KB's and tabata have been overly lauded as the be all and end all of conditioning.
Tabata were never meant to be used for excess repetitions, never meant to be used by untrained athletes, never meant to be used for a prolonged period, never meant to be the main form of training to be undertaken and never meant to be used when doing a circuit (especially involving OL which some people use them for). As I said before, excess fatique and poor technique with OL and quite a few regular lifts is a receipe for injury.
KB's are ok, but I don't see why a shift in the centre of gravity is so excellent over using a adjustable DB (and a LOT cheaper).

edit- being a hypocrite, I will say I like a circuit called magic 5 by ross.
He uses DB (or KB is you wish) swings, clean and presses and burpees.
The rep ranges remain the same, but the volume can be increased by increasing the weight, wearing a weighted vest and the density can be increased by just doing it faster.
 

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