Cross training machine thingys (like skiing in the gym)

#1
Naff or a decent workout? (of course bearing in mind that excercise is what one makes of it!)

Thoughts & strong views would be appreciated....
 
#2
I just cannot get into that machine at all. Movement feels unnatural, and although my arms move, I don't feel they are doing much work.

Having said that, I usually only use the aerobic machines in the gym for a 5-10 min warm up before a weights session. For the more serious stuff, I go running.

However, some others swear by the X-trainer, so each to their own.
 
#3
Pork_Pie said:
I just cannot get into that machine at all. Movement feels unnatural, and although my arms move, I don't feel they are doing much work.

Having said that, I usually only use the aerobic machines in the gym for a 5-10 min warm up before a weights session. For the more serious stuff, I go running.

However, some others swear by the X-trainer, so each to their own.
I must admit,it's strange set up,not sure if it's good or bad for co-ordination.Looks like something you'd torture a thunderbirds puppet on.

It's not bad though,I can pound out the miles on it in a good time,and it works the arms (slightly).
 
#4
Very strange motion but you do get the hang of it after a while. Also very useful for keeping bags and things off the floor so the bunny doesn't eat them. Unfortunately the bunny has eaten through the power lead....
 
#5
Very good for rehab work as it is very low impact & keeps joints inline etc. as said, once you have it sussed its pretty good. I would only use it as a warm up though.
 
#6
Very useful bit of kit - studies show that CV effort same as running but protects joints from impact. useful for rehab as mentioned earlier and for anyone showing signs of wear and tear in knees/hips. Could replace on or 2 runs a week if prepping for a race.

Try with just legs if your co-ordination isn't too good.
 
#7
LadyHamilton said:
Very useful bit of kit - studies show that CV effort same as running but protects joints from impact. useful for rehab as mentioned earlier and for anyone showing signs of wear and tear in knees/hips. Could replace on or 2 runs a week if prepping for a race.

Try with just legs if your co-ordination isn't too good.
Thanks.

Running a marathon this coming weekend, was going to take it a bit easy,but might give it a go in the hotel gym.

Cheers all!
 
#8
I am injured at the mo so can only do low impact stuff - echo board-surfin's remark - excellent for rehab.

Its as hard as you make it as most of them have various levels of difficulty.

Good luck with the marathon.
 
#9
theloggie said:
I am injured at the mo so can only do low impact stuff - echo board-surfin's remark - excellent for rehab.

Its as hard as you make it as most of them have various levels of difficulty.

Good luck with the marathon.
Well indeed,it makes a change from the norm (ie pounding the paths in and around town)

Thanks for the luck, hope you're back on the mend soon too.
 
#10
i used to use it in the gym all the time instead of the treadmill. Found it much easier on my knees. Bloody good work out and you can use it stepping backwards.
 
#11
Worth pointing out that there is a big difference between good and bad models. I suffer with a bad knee and can use most of these to get a good CV workout. Have used a couple however that seem to really aggravate the probs in my knee so are worse than useless and actually cause me more probs.

Suggest you try them out if you have a selection in the gym. If you were going to buy one then you may want to try and organise some sort of trial first.
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#12
They are excellent for improving your cardio-vascular fitness without damaging your joints. I've been using them for three or four years with no problems at all. They also provide an excellent pre-weights session warm-up.

But having said that, cross-trainer machines are no substitute for running if that's what you're training for. They don't provide much of a work-out for the muscles you use to stabilise your knees, ankles, hips and upper body when you run, so you'll need to do that as well to get the maximum benefit from an exercise program.
 
#13
Coincidence, I flicked onto one of the (many!) shopping channels last night and was mesmirised by the toned arrse of the lovely female using a cross trainer...10 minutes later, I even thought of buying one...she had sold it to me.

But seriously, as the years and years of pounding the roads have given me a few knee problems now and again, I might invest in one.
 
#14
I've heard them referred to as the "dyslexic trainer" - everything all over the place.

Have you tried going backwards on them? Now that's worth a go just for fun...
 
#16
I got one for the mrs last year from this place:
http://www.thesportshq.com/ProductDetails.asp?Affiliate=Shopping.com&PCLinkID=491
they were quick delivery and considering its a cheap and cheerful one, I must say it seems to do the business, I usually run 2.4k around the 08.40 ish mark on the X trainer it takes me about 07.20 so allow for a bit of error on the mileage front, do a 30 minute stint on it and I would say its as good as a gym based one, my mrs thinks it the business but then again her heads in the shed and the sheds way down at the bottom of the garden!
 
#17
If you're thinking of buying one, it's well worth looking in the most unlikely places. There's often some good discounted offers on. I got one of these
http://www.perfectumfitness.com/eng/index.htm
from Lidl of all places for £130 last year. It was a sod to put together but the programmes are good. The heart monitor contacts are iffy but can be used with a chest strap.
 
#18
theloggie said:
I am injured at the mo so can only do low impact stuff - echo board-surfin's remark - excellent for rehab.

Its as hard as you make it as most of them have various levels of difficulty.

Good luck with the marathon.
Physically sore,mentally winner :D

A healthy 4 hours and five.
 

Latest Threads