CRM114 unit

Discussion in 'Royal Signals' started by dougiebarder, Oct 30, 2006.

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  1. I don't know if anybody will know this, but is this unit genuine, or has somebody made it as a mock up?

    Attached Files:

  2. I'm with roadster here, i think its a film prop or a mockup for some enthuiasts restored vehicle.

    How does the thing look internally? If you take the example of a Clansman 353, internally it is packed with components all arranged in closed modules. How does this thing look, its it packed out with electronics and wiggly amp stuff or is it an empty box with a large amount of gizmos bolted to the front panel?

    The front panel might also hold clues. Under the paint or from the rear it might be obvious that its been hammered out of aluminium plate in someones garage. If the item were geniune, it would have been professionally moulded and probably have a metal gauze seal where the front joins to the body.
  3. Didnt Stanley Kubrick use that number in all his films? He certainly did in Doctor Stangelove.
  4. Wiki says he did

    CRM114 is a program based upon a statistical approach for classifying data, and especially used for filtering email spam. While others have done statistical Bayesian filtering based upon the frequency of single word occurrences in email, CRM114 achieves a higher rate of spam recognition through creating hits based upon phrases up to five words in length. These phrases are used to form a hidden Markov model of the incoming texts. With this additional contextual recognition, it is one of the more accurate spam filters available. The author claims recognition rates as high as 99.87%, however these results are not reproduced in independent tests by Holden and at TREC 2005. CRM114's classifier can also be switched to use Lightstone's Winnow algorithm, character-by-character correlation, a variant on KNN (K-nearest neighbor algorithm) classification called Hyperspace, or other more experimental classifiers.

    As an example of pattern recognition software, CRM114 is a good example of machine learning accomplished with a reasonably simple algorithm. Source code in C is available through the external link.

    At a deeper level, CRM114 is also a string pattern matching language, similar to grep or even Perl; although it is Turing complete it is highly tuned for matching text, and even a simple (recursive) definition of the factorial takes almost ten lines, looking somewhat confusing to the uninitiated. Part of this is because the crm114 language syntax is not positional, but declensional. As a programming language, it may be used for many other applications aside from detecting spam. CRM114 uses the TRE approximate-match regex engine, so it's possible to write programs that do not depend on absolutely identical strings matching to function correctly.

    Where is the picture from ?
  5. Certainly looks like a bit of made up kit to me. However, I remember working on experimental kit when in 14 Sigs, and they looked like something that were more the product of fevered imagination, as they weren't in production. Perhaps this is something like that, a gizmo with an unknown function, that never made it to field service - you never know!
    Agree totally with the other comments though, and those Co-Ax connectors look too dodgy by half - something out of Maplins!!!

  6. It is an empty box, I got it with a bunch or landrover part's. I thought it looked pretty ropey, but wondered if it was made as a mock up for an actual unit. It's got ventilation louvres on the sides, and a tray on the top to clip something else on. The WIKI page said there's been a few film's that used CRM114, so I'll have to see if I can spot this one.
    Cheers for the advice.