Crimean War

Found this picture on the Aldershot Historical Website......quality.

1511708_10202424891936081_177722582_n.jpg

The following write ups were with it......

Colour Sergeant William McGregor (Regimental Nº 2404), 1st Battalion Scots Fusilier Guards, July 1856. He was wounded during the Battle at the River Alma on 20th September 1854 and wears both the British Crimea and the Order of the Medjidie Turkish medals.
At the Crimean War's end, troops gathered in Aldershot for a London victory parade. Mcgregor was among the soldiers photographed in Aldershot by Robert Howlett and Joseph Cundall for their series of portraits entitled 'Crimean Heroes 1856'.............
 
R

renamed_user

Guest
Very impressive, IIRC the Royal Mail published a series stamps showing these Crimea victory parade photo's a few years ago. All the characters featured were equally fearsome looking, proper beards etc.
What is the rifle featured in this picture please?
 
Very impressive, IIRC the Royal Mail published a series stamps showing these Crimea victory parade photo's a few years ago. All the characters featured were equally fearsome looking, proper beards etc.
What is the rifle featured in this picture please?

No idea mate.....someone on here will know though.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
This was with it.....quite hard to read though......

View attachment 154011
I'll have a go:

.. it appears that his conduct has been that of a very good and efficient (or effectual) Non Commissioned Officer. Zealous in the performance of all his duties, trustworthy and sober, he was in possession of one Regtl good conduct (Pay?) when promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He was present at the Battles of the Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman and Siege of Sevastopol for which he has earned (?) the Crimean Medal with 4 clasps, the French Medal and the Turkish Medal, he is also in possession of the Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct. He has never been tried by Court Martial and his name has not been recorded in the Regimental Defaulter Book for any offence.
 
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oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
The medal rolls have him with the Crimea Medal and the Balaclava Clasp for action on 28 Oct 1984.
Discharge 25 Jan 1860 at his own request having competed 21 years & 353 days service.
Enlisted 7 Feb 1839. Born Hunting Tower Perthshire.
He was 6ft 1.
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
On the 1841 census he's stationed in Wellington Barracks.
 
I'll have a go:

.. it appears that his conduct has been that of a very good and efficient (or effectual) Non Commissioned Officer. Zealous in the performance of all his duties, trustworthy and sober, he was in possession of one Regtl good conduct (Pay?) when promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He was present at the Battles of the Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman and Siege of Sevastopol for which he has earned (?) the Crimean Medal with 4 clasps, the French Medal and the Turkish Medal, he is also in possession of the Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct. He has never been tried by Court Martial and his name has not been recorded in the Regimental Defaulter Book for any offence.
So basically an all round good bloke and snappy dresser.....








....and ally as ****!

(great pic JD)
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
They did have great beards in those days. Colour Sgt William Knapp, Coldstream Guards. He is wearing the Crimea Medal with four bars for Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann and Sebastopol.
 

Attachments

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
at least they do a better job than the current tour tache.
 

DR destruction

Old-Salt
All part of the Victorian bread movement it is actually harder to find a Victorian man without facial hair than with.


The Beard Movement in Victorian Britain
Christopher Oldstone-Moore
From: Victorian Studies
Volume 48, Number 1, Autumn 2005
pp. 7-34 | 10.1353/vic.2006.0046

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Victorian Studies 48.1 (2005) 7-34

[h=3]Christopher Oldstone-Moore[/h]Wright State University
In the middle of the nineteenth century the face of masculinity suddenly changed in Western culture. In a few short years, full beards spread from the social margins inhabited by artists and Chartists into the respectable mainstream. This transformation of men's faces has thus far drawn remarkably little comment from historians or literary critics. The Victorians, by contrast, had a great deal to say about this renovation of the masculine image. In pamphlets, polemical books, and the periodical press, Victorians engaged in a lively discussion that sheds light on changing notions of masculinity and illuminates the decision of millions of British men to spurn more than a century of tradition by letting their beards grow.
The timing of this change is significant. The current standard line on this great change was established by G. M. Trevelyan, who explained the new style as an imitation of the heroic and hirsute soldiers returning from the Crimea (549). But the trend was well underway before the war began in 1854. More importantly Trevelyan's explanation obscures the deeper social roots and cultural significance of this impulse towards remaking the masculine image. When one attends to the conversation about manliness and beards, what emerges is a new perspective on mid-Victorian perceptions of gender, and greater understanding of how and why concepts of masculinity were reformulated in this period.
In modern history, the shaved face has been the rule, while beards have enjoyed widespread popularity only relatively briefly during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and again in the mid- Victorian period. In the early nineteenth century beards indicated particular radical political affiliations, including socialism or Chartism, and were generally unfashionable. But after 1850, the beard movement in Britain began. In 1852, the editors ofTait's Edinburgh Magazine declared themselves "champions of the long beard," and drolly prophesied the dawn of a new era: "Already the martial moustache, the haughty imperial, and the daily expanding whiskers, like accredited heralds, proclaim the approaching advent of the monarch Beard; the centuries of his banishment are drawing to their destined close, and the hour and the man are at hand to re-establish his ancient reign" ("Few" 611, 614). True to their prediction, there was during 1853 and 1854 a veritable explosion of rather more earnest commentary in all manner of print media. Henry Morley and William Henry Wills contributed an article in Charles Dickens's Household Words titled "Why Shave?" which was a true beard manifesto. Alexander Rowland followed soon after with a volume entitled The Human Hair, Popularly and Physiologically Considered, which devoted two chapters to the history and importance of beards. The artist James Ward produced an Essay in Defense of the Beard, joined by "David's" The Beard! Why do We Cut it Off? There was even a full volume entitled The Philosophy of Beards by T. S. Gowing. Reprints and reviews inevitably followed, including "The Beard and Moustache Movement" in the Illustrated London News, and a review article simply headed "The Beard" in the Westminster Review. Naturally, Punchdid its part as well, contributing a series of articles, notices, and cartoons.
To Britons of the 1850s, the rapid progress of the bearded look, and the enthusiastic rhetoric that attended it, constituted a veritable beard movement. Of course, when Victorians referred to a "beard movement"—sometimes wryly, sometimes seriously—they did not mean to imply an organized political campaign. Their intent was to recognize both a dramatic change in men's appearance, and the emergence of a host of writers to promote a new masculine image by articulating an ideology of beards. The contributor to the Illustrated London News,for example, wrote of a "new agitation," which in some measure represented a battle between reason and custom ("Beard and Moustache" 95). The reasons given for wearing beards were remarkably consistent during the 1850s and 1860s. At the core of this consensus was the idea that beards were integral to that elemental masculinity which still pertained in the modern age, first by contributing to men's health and vitality, and second by serving as the outward mark...

 

DR destruction

Old-Salt
Some more Crimean veteran's.

 
There was a period in the army when facial hair was mandatory. I believe the Crimean War was during this time.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer


Them's Russkies. Still Crimean vets, though.

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Capture.PNG
 
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Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
There was a period in the army when facial hair was mandatory. I believe the Crimean War was during this time.
stopped during ww1 IIRC, brought it up a few weeks back.
 
stopped during ww1 IIRC, brought it up a few weeks back.
I remember you referring to it a few weeks ago. Just did a Google on it and discovered it was as late as 1916 when it stopped. I would have thought earlier in the 1900's but there you go.
 

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