Crime pays, or does it?

#1
Perhaps old news to some but something to show the Border Force do more than reject immigrants etc

The sad story of how a trio on a small fishing vessel were recently caught with nearly a ton of 70% pure cocaine with a street value of £82m

I particularly liked the part where the captain of the ship claims he was forced into it...

"The seizure was one of the biggest-ever drug hauls at sea around the UK and followed a high-risk operation by authorities."

The men were on the UK fishing boat Bianca, which was boarded by National Crime Agency and Border Force officers off the Cornish coast in August 2016.

David Pleasants, 57, from Grimsby and Dutchman Gerald Van de Kooij, 27, pleaded guilty to importing class A drugs at the start of their trial.

Michael McDermott, from Ireland, attempted to bring a tonne of cocaine into the country. The haul, weighing 939kg and up to 70% pure, was the biggest single seizure of cocaine in the UK in 2016.

The 68-year-old was arrested with his shipmates, David Pleasants, 57, from Grimsby and Gerald Van de Kooij, 27 from the Netherlands, last August. Pleasants was jailed for 14 years and de Kooij will serve 12 years.

A jury at Bristol Crown Court has now also found the boat's skipper, Michael McDermott, guilty of drug smuggling.

The 68-year-old man claimed although he knew the cocaine was on board, he had been acting under duress and forced into shipping the cocaine by his two co-accused.

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The drugs haul was one of the biggest ever recovered at sea around the UK. Authorities have told Sky News that attempts to smuggle bigger amounts of drugs into British waters are becoming more frequent.

Raymond, a covert officer for the National Crime Agency, was in charge of the joint Border Force-NCA operation to board the Bianca.

He said that operation, on August 18, 2016, was a high-risk manoeuvre.

He said: "We had to make sure all our operational parameters were covered in terms of safety. We had a back-up search and rescue helicopter if necessary.

"When we put in the strike on the vessel, we go from a position of stealth from far afield and get on board the vessel as quickly as possible.

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"We used two boarding boats on this occasion and got as many boarding officers on board the target vessel as quickly as possible.

"At the time of boarding, we didn't know who was on board, we didn't know who they were, how many people were on the vessel.

"So the whole operational tactic is to try and overwhelm as quickly as possible in order to preserve evidence and to make sure they don't get ideas about running away or approaching us with violence."

The UK Border Force is tasked with guarding the thousands of miles of Britain's coastline, along with the Royal Navy and fisheries protection squadrons.
 
#2
Good to know that our tax pounds do occasionally yield results then.
 
#3
It should be noted that David Pleasants had a very unpleasant history behind him as noted here from back in 2012

ONE of North East Lincolnshire's most notorious criminals has walked free from jail after a court appeal.

Infamous for a criminal career spanning two decades, most of which has been spent in prison, David Pleasants, 53, was released by Appeal Court judges yesterday.

As reported, he was responsible for a string of serious and audacious crimes, including robbery, blackmail, drug dealing and escape from custody.

In one of his escapes, he left a police constable with a fractured skull. Another attempt to escape left five officers injured and took three pairs of handcuffs to restrain him.


Read more at Notorious 'danger man' David Pleasants freed by Appeal Court judges
 
#4
I think career criminals are wired mentally in a different way to the rest of the populace who go about their lives in a lawful manner. They just don't see their function in society the same way.

As to whether it pays, it most certainly does, & the rewards can be high. They also come at a price, you are in a ruthless, fickle and violent world. If you survive unscathed you also have the constant threat of imprisonment, with large parts of your life in gaol.

The thought of living like that seems utterly exhausting & terrifying so I'm happy to be an ordinary schlub.
 
#5
I think career criminals are wired mentally in a different way to the rest of the populace who go about their lives in a lawful manner. They just don't see their function in society the same way.

As to whether it pays, it most certainly does, & the rewards can be high. They also come at a price, you are in a ruthless, fickle and violent world. If you survive unscathed you also have the constant threat of imprisonment, with large parts of your life in gaol.

The thought of living like that seems utterly exhausting & terrifying so I'm happy to be an ordinary schlub.
The men at the top rarely get caught. For those underneath, yeah, you walk away with 20/30/40/50 grand for a job but when you get 8-10 years for it, it hardly represents value for money. You're better off working at Tesco.
 
#6
I think career criminals are wired mentally in a different way to the rest of the populace who go about their lives in a lawful manner. They just don't see their function in society the same way.

As to whether it pays, it most certainly does, & the rewards can be high. They also come at a price, you are in a ruthless, fickle and violent world. If you survive unscathed you also have the constant threat of imprisonment, with large parts of your life in gaol.

The thought of living like that seems utterly exhausting & terrifying so I'm happy to be an ordinary schlub.
Well the skipper is 68 and plus the 16 years he's received he'll be 84, anyone fancy a few lines along the lines of "best days of my life?" that is a serious stretch, the other fellows got 14 and 12 years.
 
#8
Prices gone up now? Streets free of drugs?
Like a piss in the ocean. I don't like drugs but agree that criminalisation is the wrong way to tackle it.
We are starting to see the tide turn on smoking. Drugs already have the pariah about them but lets get them funding their own enforcement like fags and booze have.
 
#9
Like a piss in the ocean. I don't like drugs but agree that criminalisation is the wrong way to tackle it.
We are starting to see the tide turn on smoking. Drugs already have the pariah about them but lets get them funding their own enforcement like fags and booze have.
I don't quite get what you mean here, are you suggesting their own independent forces to combat the constant problems narcotics bring in? Isn't that what HMRC and the UK BA already do?
 
#10
I don't quite get what you mean here, are you suggesting their own independent forces to combat the constant problems narcotics bring in? Isn't that what HMRC and the UK BA already do?
Are you on ******* drugs?

I'm saying the opposite.

No more forces. Pull plod off the case. Legalise it, tax it, treat it. It'll fund itself while putting the real crims out of business instead of jailing the weak willed victims who matter not a bloody jot in the grand scheme.
 
#11
Guy paid taxes (70 G) in one year-----honest crook?--------got 16 years for cocaine.

I expect most stashed away beyond reach.

He reckoned the judge thought he was taking the piss,by paying the tax!
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#12
Like a piss in the ocean. I don't like drugs but agree that criminalisation is the wrong way to tackle it.
We are starting to see the tide turn on smoking. Drugs already have the pariah about them but lets get them funding their own enforcement like fags and booze have.
They love to show this stuff, streets dry of drugs, prices up? Nah
 
#13
They love to show this stuff, streets dry of drugs, prices up? Nah
Back when I was considered a 'menace to society' and had to report in, there were regularly signs up reminding our dopamine replacement therapy friends that supply was higher than usual hence purity was much stronger and to reduce the dose.

Had I been an enterprising sort, I'd have put GBFO signs up saying 'Big bust in Hull and Scouseland, going dry. double up doses. Don't let your dealer sell you short!" The 'service' would have been underwhelmed within the week although there'd have been a sudden spike in the shovel industry.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#14
#16
Are you on ******* drugs?

I'm saying the opposite.

No more forces. Pull plod off the case. Legalise it, tax it, treat it. It'll fund itself while putting the real crims out of business instead of jailing the weak willed victims who matter not a bloody jot in the grand scheme.[/QUOTE
Are you on ******* drugs?

I'm saying the opposite.

No more forces. Pull plod off the case. Legalise it, tax it, treat it. It'll fund itself while putting the real crims out of business instead of jailing the weak willed victims who matter not a bloody jot in the grand scheme.
Great idea, bearing in mind cocaine and other narcotics were made illegal in the first place for the effects they cause on society?

I've seen a few examples on the street, some of whom how I did know brief on my pathway through life and the effects were ugly, one of the individuals was once a bar manager at a pub I worked at, she was quite a bouncy happy individual, certainly wouldn't drill her as she didn't do it for me, but when I came across her outside another pub down the road she was sullen and withdrawn and a bit of a wreck, quite sad to be honest.

Another night on the town I crossed pathes with a begger who was in the year below me at school and he explained he'd be sniffing it up happy days, bought him a burger and coke and was on my way.

Morale of the story? Legalising is as much a potential problem as it is least a potential solution...
 
#17
Great idea, bearing in mind cocaine and other narcotics were made illegal in the first place for the effects they cause on society?

I've seen a few examples on the street, some of whom how I did know brief on my pathway through life and the effects were ugly, one of the individuals was once a bar manager at a pub I worked at, she was quite a bouncy happy individual, certainly wouldn't drill her as she didn't do it for me, but when I came across her outside another pub down the road she was sullen and withdrawn and a bit of a wreck, quite sad to be honest.

Another night on the town I crossed pathes with a begger who was in the year below me at school and he explained he'd be sniffing it up happy days, bought him a burger and coke and was on my way.

Morale of the story? Legalising is as much a potential problem as it is least a potential solution...


Running a cost benefit analysis would show it's better for society to legalise drugs
 
#18
Running a cost benefit analysis would show it's better for society to legalise drugs
And the chances of that happening? We didn't ban them or restrict their usage for no reason such as harmful side effects or constant impulses to go crazy on them, drugs have to be the modern soldiers worst enemy with regards to CDT because the effects of being caught are always getting higher.

Anyone care to inform me what would go on a red book or discharge sheet for someone who failed a CDT?

It certainly wouldn't show great credit either way
 
#19
The Gin Act,1751, seemed to work out well.


But the Volstead Act?

Not quite.
 

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