Crime figures up and police numbers at their lowest level since 1985

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I was actually going to mention how I was completely against that abortion of a uniform but couldn't think of her name. I think Bernie h h had one as well but couldn't find a picture. I'm against some ridiculous self made-up vanity uniform but I do accept the need for an official mess dress. If ma'am dick had something like that made up I'd be most unimpressed.
I’d like to be a fly on the wall at the measuring up.

Ooo suits you madam, now if madam would just smile, thats it, now what side does madam dress:-?
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
@moggy_cattermole

The Crime Academy ( the artist formerly known as the Detective Training School) used to have a photo on the wall of a CID DS function from the 1920s. Everyone in black tie looking very tasy (just back from hanging a bloke, and off to fit someone up).

I have seen police mess kit, which frankly looked hysterical.

But then again (no offence) I would rather the uniforms had a mess kit, so I could tell who was a detective and who was not. Indeed, at one nick our annual function had a 'lid of the year award', which was a hat with a revolving blue light on top for shaming the CID officer caught doing the most uniform thing in the past year.

It'd be called bullying now, but after a skinful this ritual humiliation was quite good fun.
And pray what’s wrong with wooden tops, sorry I mean uniform:-?
I bet that another thing you can’t say today.
 
I agree. I am from the generation.......not many of us left......where you wore your tunic to court. Reflected the gravity and formality of the proceedings. Now we don't even issue tunics. Court, Remembrance Sunday, force funerals even, in a fleece. (There is a small stock of loan tunics, but its luck if it fits and is in reasonable nick. Luckily I kept mine)
The 'modern' thinking is that if you are representing the organisation, you are 'on duty' and therefore should have access to all your appointments, baton, cuffs, spray, pocketbook. Therefore Ms Dick should have attended the state banquet in her fleece and belt kit.
TJF
I served when we moved from tunics to usual dress. I was once in magistrates court with a guy my Sgt and I had nicked for attacking his neighbours whilst drunk. CPS duly watered it down to something minor and he got the usual fine, costs etc (after pleading NG:rolleyes:). Because the medal ribbon was worn on the tunic and I had a GSM he came up to me afterwards and we had a bit of a chat. Ex-army himself, and a bit embarrassed about the whole thing (not enough to plead guilty, though). No hard feelings, though, eh?
From then on it was scruffy and grubby stab vests.
 
@moggy_cattermole

The Crime Academy ( the artist formerly known as the Detective Training School) used to have a photo on the wall of a CID DS function from the 1920s. Everyone in black tie looking very tasy (just back from hanging a bloke, and off to fit someone up).

I have seen police mess kit, which frankly looked hysterical.

But then again (no offence) I would rather the uniforms had a mess kit, so I could tell who was a detective and who was not. Indeed, at one nick our annual function had a 'lid of the year award', which was a hat with a revolving blue light on top for shaming the CID officer caught doing the most uniform thing in the past year.

It'd be called bullying now, but after a skinful this ritual humiliation was quite good fun.
It's easy. You can spot the Ds. Look for the shiny suits and ridiculous pointy shoes. Dressed like they were off to a school prom. And waistcoats seem to be a thing again. One of our finest detective minds.......cough......wears patent leather pointy shoes........
 
Ive even had PSD accept that point - non home office approved is generally okay in my experience.
I presented a very agitated and extremely violent fella to a custody sergeant not too long ago. Said detained person was cuffed to the rear, t-shirt pulled up over his face and head. He was covered in scuffs, cuts and abrasions. When t-shirt was pulled down he had a swollen cheek and the beginnings of a black eye from a closed fist punch to his face. Police ombudsman carried out an investigation, both criminal and misconduct against me. In the end, after hearing and seeing evidence of him spitting at me, biting me on the hand, punching me, kicking me and then attempting to bite me on the face while cuffed and in the restricted confines of the rear of a saloon car. I was found to have acted lawfully and used force proportionately given the circumstances. Neither the punch to his face nor t-shirt pulled over his head were ever taught to me in any PSP session. While the whole experience of being investigated wasn’t pleasant I took some confidence that sometimes, providing you can explain, and put into context your actions, the law regarding use of physical force can be applied sensibly.
 
I presented a very agitated and extremely violent fella to a custody sergeant not too long ago. Said detained person was cuffed to the rear, t-shirt pulled up over his face and head. He was covered in scuffs, cuts and abrasions. When t-shirt was pulled down he had a swollen cheek and the beginnings of a black eye from a closed fist punch to his face. Police ombudsman carried out an investigation, both criminal and misconduct against me. In the end, after hearing and seeing evidence of him spitting at me, biting me on the hand, punching me, kicking me and then attempting to bite me on the face while cuffed and in the restricted confines of the rear of a saloon car. I was found to have acted lawfully and used force proportionately given the circumstances. Neither the punch to his face nor t-shirt pulled over his head were ever taught to me in any PSP session. While the whole experience of being investigated wasn’t pleasant I took some confidence that sometimes, providing you can explain, and put into context your actions, the law regarding use of physical force can be applied sensibly.
That’s very good to hear. You don’t say how long the ombudsman’s investigation took and its impact on your life.
I remember the first time I told my Mrs that I had had a complaint made about me. She phoned her dad in terror, asking for advice. He was a former DI and laughed it off. Then FIL phoned me just to check, the cheeky get.
I once had a colleague punch a smack head twat full in the face. My colleague and our Sgt had come across a vehicle which had rolled to a halt against a gate. On checking, said smack head was in the driver’s seat. When he was eventually roused, he kicked off, and my colleague punched him. Decked the cnut. Nicked.
When smackhead matey wanted to complain, we had a laugh as the guy who decked him was the mildest-mannered bloke we had all met. He was concerned before court but when asked “Did you deck my client?” He said “I thought he might deck me!” Magistrates sent smackhead down for a bit.
 
It's easy. You can spot the Ds. Look for the shiny suits and ridiculous pointy shoes. Dressed like they were off to a school prom. And waistcoats seem to be a thing again. One of our finest detective minds.......cough......wears patent leather pointy shoes........
That's now.

Once upon a time DS's ruled the place.

Still, Bullshire seems to have a good insight into the modern police farce.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I agree. I am from the generation.......not many of us left......where you wore your tunic to court. Reflected the gravity and formality of the proceedings. Now we don't even issue tunics. Court, Remembrance Sunday, force funerals even, in a fleece. (There is a small stock of loan tunics, but its luck if it fits and is in reasonable nick. Luckily I kept mine)
The 'modern' thinking is that if you are representing the organisation, you are 'on duty' and therefore should have access to all your appointments, baton, cuffs, spray, pocketbook. Therefore Ms Dick should have attended the state banquet in her fleece and belt kit.
TJF
I would pay good money to see the looks on the faces of the current senior managers when they are asked to "produce your appointments"
 
I should have kept scrolling, Met Police Sgt's Mess DressView attachment 404275
The Mess Kit I saw (courtesy of being chatty with the farce tailor*) was like that, apart from what I can only describe as "vivid blue" lapels with force insignia on them.

I think in the years I was in I only heard of one senior officers mess function where they would have worn them.

Frankly, the seniors I was exposed to were less likely to wear that kit than they were their body armour and PPE (and there was **** all chance of that!)

*Who was very nice and professional and did alterations on my reserve kit and my own Dinner Jacket.
 
Is this gen?

Can you really get a police escort now to enable you to disrupt commuters if you're an eco loon?

 
They even admit to trying to disrupt people's lives, seems a weird sense of priorities ignore the stabathon going on and protect Marxist eco loons trying to disrupt people's lives

Extinction Rebellion have told LBC they are using boats to block key roads in major cities around the UK - and they will be there all week
 
I've been on leave and have heard on the grapevine it's happened. They've not even had the decency to bother to tell me. Out of Office was on, and I have contact details on the system.
 
There’s a way round that. Turn up for the shift you were last aware you were rostered for prior to going on leave. I’m darn sure i don’t take work related calls when I’m on rest days or leave.
 
Is this gen?

Can you really get a police escort now to enable you to disrupt commuters if you're an eco loon?

Welcome to the forum, Cmdr Walton. ;)

Mr Walton said police suffered from a lack of intelligence on XR, which is advised by campaigning lawyer Tim Crosland, a former head of law at the National Crime Agency.

“Police were too tolerant and a bit naive which came from a lack of understanding. XR was much more cute about the law of protest than the people policing it,” said Mr Walton.
Treat Extinction Rebellion as an extremist anarchist group, former anti-terror chief tells police

Still, I am sure a police force of direct entry detectives where no-body spends more than about ten years in total will develop the subject matter expertise to keep up.
 
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