Cressida Dick looks Stuffed

When SB lost the war, a Night of the Long Knives / Petty minded vindictiveness, got rid of quite a few capable officers, and the professional standards of running an operation room were kicked into touch.
We had a couple who ended up in Brent. The Met equivelent of Vietnam or being sent to the Russian Front. One was a Skipper in uniform who told me about the power struggles. We had a DI on the crime desk for a short time, ex SB and very bitter at the system. Decamped to 'the Box.' The grade he transferred in at was similar the the salary he was getting in the Met and he transferred his pension over.
 
Rent Aid was changed to Housing allowance I can’t remember the financial details, some stayed on the old allowance some were put on housing allowance.
I think if memory serves that new recruits went onto an altogether different pay scale, it really was a time of divide and conquer.

There are still people who are at the tail end of their careers getting housing allowance.
 
the war between SB and the Anti-Terrorist Squad resulted in a huge loss of professionalism that contributed to that farce.

Yes I remember it well another case of the Met rearranging the deckchairs on the titanic. It wasn't just SB and Anti terrorist, it was pretty much the whole of Serious crime. Units lost their in house surveillance capability to be amalgamated together into one, any units authorised to carry firearms, such as flying squad and others lost the capability and had to hand control to the ARV people.
I was covert policing at the time (SCD10) and we suddenly found ourselves part of community policing for a while, not sure either of us knew what to make of that.
 
That £21,402 are allowances ie London weighting/allowance included? Jeez that is ridiculously low, I mean I’m not going to release my figures but my pension and I dare say a lot of other posters pensions here is a lot higher than that.
How the feck are you suppose to afford to commute into work especially with these new congestion charges that Khan is bringing in? It will cost you to work
No mate, joining the Met today will give you (apparently) £30,000 or so including London Allowances and weighting.
Just over double what some people were getting a long time ago in a universe far away for doing the same job in relative terms.

 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
No mate, joining the Met today will give you (apparently) £30,000 or so including London Allowances and weighting.
Just over double what some people were getting a long time ago in a universe far away for doing the same job in relative terms.

I should think that after tax and NI and the pension contributions a new prob is looking at a monthly net income of about £2,000. You’ll need to work some OT to make it worth while or forget about the joys of driving a van and an area car and go for promotion, and where’s the fun in that? :slow:
 
No mate, joining the Met today will give you (apparently) £30,000 or so including London Allowances and weighting.
Just over double what some people were getting a long time ago in a universe far away for doing the same job in relative terms.

Harry give it up mate some of us where there as well you know. The section house and married quarters were free other than the £5 month you paid for newspapers in the SQ. We were on overtime pretty much as much as you wanted, Remember volountary's every Saturday for the football? subsistence allowance paid on Friday in a little brown envelope in cash, cleaning tokens, plain clothes allowance, free dental, the list went on. I'm not denying it was hard work but if you put the hours in you got the rewards.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Harry give it up mate some of us where there as well you know. The section house and married quarters were free other than the £5 month you paid for newspapers in the SQ. We were on overtime pretty much as much as you wanted, Remember volountary's every Saturday for the football? subsistence allowance paid on Friday in a little brown envelope in cash, cleaning tokens, plain clothes allowance, free dental, the list went on. I'm not denying it was hard work but if you put the hours in you got the rewards.
I’d clean forgot about those little brown envelopes.:-D
 
Last edited:

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Yes but you were REME.

Hendon - 87/88 own room with bed and sink the size of a Corporal's bunk in the Army. No room inspections or lights out at 23.00.
I was a Royal Anglian before depot REME old boy.

I was at Police College in Ashford as a 33 year old ex REME Sergeant and I still shared a room, bulled boots and had lights put at 23.00. In the same room as a 19 year old who didn't know how to press a shirt and missed his girlfriend.

After pass out, there wasn't a bloke there that I wouldn't want helping out in a hard street arrest though.
 
It was hard work indeed, but £30k a year for doing the same job now is a bit better than £13k.
At today's rates.
And we were not talking about specialising, first year Pcs never got brown envelopes or subs which is the comparison I was making.
If you want to talk about specifics, excluding the Crime Desk of which I have no knowledge whatsoever, then crack on.
 
I should think that after tax and NI and the pension contributions a new prob is looking at a monthly net income of about £2,000. You’ll need to work some OT to make it worth while or forget about the joys of driving a van and an area car and go for promotion, and where’s the fun in that? :slow:

It was about £1400 pcm after tax and deductions when I started, but the pay scales were a bit weird then - you started low and got higher increments.

edit sorry misremembered, £1400.
edit edit - the pay scales now are a bit flatter, start higher but with lower graduations.
 
Last edited:
It was hard work indeed, but £30k a year for doing the same job now is a bit better than £13k.
At today's rates.
And we were not talking about specialising, first year Pcs never got brown envelopes or subs which is the comparison I was making.
If you want to talk about specifics, excluding the Crime Desk of which I have no knowledge whatsoever, then crack on.
The crime desk was a uniform post I was a 'tec for the majority of my service, hence the avatar.

What I'm trying to get at is yes and I'll agree pre edmund davis pay was shit, I was lucky I joined in '81 so joined on a reasonable basic pay. Even as a young PC I was able if I wanted to, and was willing to put the hours in, to could earn well, court off nights was 4 + 2. If you were nicking villains you were earning even as a prob. Subsistence was available to all it was paid after the first hour of overtime after a normal shift, not unusual if you had a prisoner in, and it was encouraged to be claimed, your skipper would remind you.
 
I was only replying to another poster that said that today's boys and girls are working under worse terms and conditions than before the Edmund Davies generation.
They aren't now and never will be.
Pure and simple.
Current employment and human rights legislation says so.
Perhaps read this link, if you haven't already, from the bad old days that puts some perspective into it.



I can add lots of personal anecdotes from a myriad of postings, but the bottom line is that pay and conditions currently are far superior than before Edmund Davies.
Sorry.
 
Yes I remember it well another case of the Met rearranging the deckchairs on the titanic. It wasn't just SB and Anti terrorist, it was pretty much the whole of Serious crime. Units lost their in house surveillance capability to be amalgamated together into one, any units authorised to carry firearms, such as flying squad and others lost the capability and had to hand control to the ARV people.
I was covert policing at the time (SCD10) and we suddenly found ourselves part of community policing for a while, not sure either of us knew what to make of that.

That might not still be the case. According to Wikipedia, most Flying Squad officers are authorised to carry firearms. Tony Long mentions working with them in his autobiography, and noted that the Flying Squad had their own unique slang that baffled even other Met coppers. :)
 
That might not still be the case. According to Wikipedia, most Flying Squad officers are authorised to carry firearms. Tony Long mentions working with them in his autobiography, and noted that the Flying Squad had their own unique slang that baffled even other Met coppers. :)
Most of it included by "the sweeney" TV programme after the producers went on the piss with them in shepherds bush I heard

A few Serious crime units had their own firearms capability but called in Tony Longs' gang (can never remember to units names they change all the time, CO11 rings a bell) if it was a pre planned op where it was known that the baddies were tooled up.

It's a good few years since I was Serious crime but like I said we lost the firearms authorisation, it may be back now and I seem to recall that a surveillance team was involved in a shooting last year. I've not heard that the flying squad got it back but I'm not in the loop anymore.
 
Last edited:
Tony Hoare, one of the screenwriters for The Sweeney, spent a good deal of his early life in prison. For robbing banks!
 
Not really sure what Harry and co expect PCs and Sergeants to be able to do to voice their displeasure of the higher ups in a disciplined organisation.

Harry and co would probably say that unless and until you all find some collective bottle and solidarity then you are stuffed.
You need to find that solidarity from within which appears to be missing at present.
AFO's in county forces getting £2000 a year extra?
£166 a month, or a fiver a day?
That is very cheap indeed.
Find some solidarity amongst yourselves mate, without it you are totally and completely stuffed.
That is how the generation of Harry and co would look at it.
 

ACAB

LE
To be fair, the war between SB and the Anti-Terrorist Squad resulted in a huge loss of professionalism that contributed to that farce. The Special Operations control room had previously been run by Special Branch. There was 'cockpit recording', unique numbered message pads with carbon paper for all concerned for the purpose of questions and updates (and everything was logged and sealed afterward) and a rule of silence in the room because ONLY the Controller was allowed to speak. Sightseers were verboten and the Controller is God, no one outranks them.
When SB lost the war, a Night of the Long Knives / Petty minded vindictiveness, got rid of quite a few capable officers, and the professional standards of running an operation room were kicked into touch.
As related to me, by someone who I know and trust who has run ops in there as Controller, there was no 'control. The first thing Dick should have done was hoof out the sightseers, all of whom were gossiping in a huddle, no matter their rank, and tell the rest of the room to shut up as there was a lot of chatting going on and absolutely nothing was being logged as it should.
In the aftermath, Chigwell Sports Centre was booked and all the senior ranks involved had a long day there, why? possibly sorting out their stories, no one revealed anything yet and nothing was minuted.
I have heard of officers who were told that giving evidence to the enquiry was likely to be detrimental to their careers and I think it is a matter of record that no interest was shown in bringing absentee officers in to give evidence.
And where was the 'cockpit recording'? Did no one switch it on because of that loss of professionalism, or did it get wiped?

The Met, under Ian Blaire, became second rate, too many inept senior officers making decisions that made their lives easier rather than the public's lives safer.
Yep, I concur
 

Mbongwe

Old-Salt
That might not still be the case. According to Wikipedia, most Flying Squad officers are authorised to carry firearms. Tony Long mentions working with them in his autobiography, and noted that the Flying Squad had their own unique slang that baffled even other Met coppers. :)
"Lethal Force" I recall the book was called; I read it a couple of years ago and was surprised at how interesting it was, considering how it narrated his career as a police officer from age 18 to 50-something (generally I find an autobiog more interesting when it spans more than one career etc.).

Along those lines I've recently watched (repeatedly) on YouTube the LWT documentary from the 1980s about the Flying Squad Tower Hill branch(?); fascinating stuff, definitely worth watching.
 

Latest Threads

Top