Crazy young chap eating ancient ration packs.

#1
Stumbled upon this quite extensive YouTube channel of a young chap from the other side of the Atlantic who has created an entire library of sourcing and reviewing ration packs from around the world and more interestingly from different eras.

Its is strangely quite interesting to watch, with the blokes enthusiasm and his need to try and actually eat the ration packs unless they are obviously toxic, going as far to consume items that have been in tins for the best part of 80 years or 45 year old pork products.

 
#5
During WWII a ship went down at anchor in some Italian port. After a year the tinned rations were salvaged for the civilian population and consumed with no reported adverse reaction.
 
#9
I ate some US Army issued pemmican out of a rat pack left in a refuge cabin in the Beartooth mountains in Montana back in November 2000. The outfitter with us who was an ex grunt said it was from 1968 according to the date code. It was edible, but the fat in it had turned it a little 'reasty'. It was thrown in with some pork & beans of indeterminate date and that made it slightly better. There was no gut ache or Montezuma's revenge afterwards.
 
#10
Stumbled upon this quite extensive YouTube channel of a young chap from the other side of the Atlantic who has created an entire library of sourcing and reviewing ration packs from around the world and more interestingly from different eras.

Its is strangely quite interesting to watch, with the blokes enthusiasm and his need to try and actually eat the ration packs unless they are obviously toxic, going as far to consume items that have been in tins for the best part of 80 years or 45 year old pork products.

I couldn't cope with a million likes and even a few radical dudes..........
 
#11
I ate some US Army issued pemmican out of a rat pack left in a refuge cabin in the Beartooth mountains in Montana back in November 2000. The outfitter with us who was an ex grunt said it was from 1968 according to the date code. It was edible, but the fat in it had turned it a little 'reasty'. It was thrown in with some pork & beans of indeterminate date and that made it slightly better. There was no gut ache or Montezuma's revenge afterwards.
I had a mate who ended up on the British Antarctic Survey for a tour. He told us of getting pissed on rum and eating rations that were nearly 50 - 60 years old from the first groups who went down there. Just stick it in 'the pantry' and it stays deep frozen in a permafrost type way.
 
#12
I had a mate who ended up on the British Antarctic Survey for a tour. He told us of getting pissed on rum and eating rations that were nearly 50 - 60 years old from the first groups who went down there. Just stick it in 'the pantry' and it stays deep frozen in a permafrost type way.
That refuge cabin had 2 or 3 shelves of stuff, some of it from decades ago. Those cans of pop that had the rivetted type seam down the side were memorable (and probably collectable now), and the idea was if you used something try and replace it with something out of your pack/supplies if possible. I remember that the commonest item was cans of creamed corn, there were dozens it seemed, so obviously not the most popular choice of repast in them there parts.:puker:
 
#13
I have eaten Vietnam era C rations in the last few years as there was one for sale randomly on a carboot near me for £1 . It had some fudge in which stank , but other stuff like crackers and peanut butter were fine . Cannot remember what the main meal was but the can had blown open anyway .

I even smoked the 4 cigarettes that came in it , they were pretty good and not at all dried out .

I did find a unopened can of chocolate from ww2 , like a tobacco tin size with a metal band all the way around the outside . Put that on ebay though and got about £75 for it .
 
#14
I have eaten Vietnam era C rations in the last few years as there was one for sale randomly on a carboot near me for £1 . It had some fudge in which stank , but other stuff like crackers and peanut butter were fine . Cannot remember what the main meal was but the can had blown open anyway .

I even smoked the 4 cigarettes that came in it , they were pretty good and not at all dried out .

I did find a unopened can of chocolate from ww2 , like a tobacco tin size with a metal band all the way around the outside . Put that on ebay though and got about £75 for it .
Are you sure it was fudge? That 1968 dated rat pack pemmican I mentioned looked a lot like fudge and had a certain 'aroma' to it.
 
#15
Are you sure it was fudge? That 1968 dated rat pack pemmican I mentioned looked a lot like fudge and had a certain 'aroma' to it.
No it was fudge or some sort of sweet , 6 or so individually wrapped as per a sweet in greaseproof paper twisted at both ends .

I thought the pemmican was more for aircrew survival kits or specialist use . I presume as they were in a can they reacted with what air was in there.
 
#16
No it was fudge or some sort of sweet , 6 or so individually wrapped as per a sweet in greaseproof paper twisted at both ends .

I thought the pemmican was more for aircrew survival kits or specialist use . I presume as they were in a can they reacted with what air was in there.
Yeah, it was wrapped in a kind of green foil, a bit like an oxo cube but rectangular, can't remember what the can was like.
 
#17
Ugh. Dead dog dicks in tomato sauce. I had enough of those in Honduras with the Engineers building a road.
Hot Dog MRE.JPG
 
#18
Recently read a biography of a chap who was on HMS Tiger in the great war (book is called HMS Tiger at bay. They were issued with salted beef dating from the early 1800's. Towed it behind the ship for a day or so then soaked it in fresh water and cooked it. Apparently it was fine.
 
#19
I have eaten Vietnam era C rations in the last few years as there was one for sale randomly on a carboot near me for £1 . It had some fudge in which stank , but other stuff like crackers and peanut butter were fine . Cannot remember what the main meal was but the can had blown open anyway .

I even smoked the 4 cigarettes that came in it , they were pretty good and not at all dried out .

I did find a unopened can of chocolate from ww2 , like a tobacco tin size with a metal band all the way around the outside . Put that on ebay though and got about £75 for it .
Sweets and chocs one of the few items that tends to go off, apparently. The stacker depot where we had our shed hidden away was mainly for food, rations and meat. For about a week of evenings and a weekend the lads all had to go in and swap out the m@rs b@rs in ration boxes, fahsunds of 'em, they had had complaints of mouldy m@rs. Pick up box, open box, remove bar, replace bar, close box, .....next.
 
#20
Recently read a biography of a chap who was on HMS Tiger in the great war (book is called HMS Tiger at bay. They were issued with salted beef dating from the early 1800's. Towed it behind the ship for a day or so then soaked it in fresh water and cooked it. Apparently it was fine.
I have to say, HMS Tiger was probably the best looking capital ship in the British Fleet in the Great Warwickshire. Probably due to the salt beef.
 

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