Crack filling prior to painting

Finally got around to painting spare bedroom since daughter flew the nest uuuummm a few years ago. This room in in the upstairs of a dormer bungalow and where the sloping roof joins the corner of the outside wall has settled over the years and come away slightly. I have used normal filler higher up towards the roof but sanding it is going to be a pig. I wondered if I could just get away with painting in lower down where its narrower or is there a cunning simple method of filling for those with clarty great non delicate task hands?

Thanks in advance
 
Crack.jpg
 
50ml syringe with a spout not leur lock
Looks like I need to make friends with the local crackheads then ;-)
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Looks like I need to make friends with the local crackheads then ;-)
Ask you local dentist if they have some of these? We use them for rinsing out sockets and around wisdom teeth.
See the source image
 
A large tube of White Builders caulk, and a squeeze gun, run the tip at an angle of 45 degrees, with the tip of the nozzle cut at an angle, move along the join at an even pace, do not stop, until you reach the end, and don't forget to release the pressure when you do. Once dry, and hardened, it can be painted over.
 
Ask you local dentist if they have some of these? We use them for rinsing out sockets and around wisdom teeth.
See the source image
Dentists effectively closed down, although mine is a bit of a mate he lives about 15 miles away :-(
 
A large tube of White Builders caulk, and a squeeze gun, run the tip at an angle of 45 degrees, with the tip of the nozzle cut at an angle, move along the join at an even pace, do not stop, until you reach the end, and don't forget to release the pressure when you do. Once dry, and hardened, it can be painted over.
Nice idea but my use of a squeeze gun leaves a result worse than if my 3 year old grand daughter did it.
 
Nice idea but my use of a squeeze gun leaves a result worse than if my 3 year old grand daughter did it.
Use, then follow lightly with a wet (water) paint brush.
 
Nice idea but my use of a squeeze gun leaves a result worse than if my 3 year old grand daughter did it.

There is no other viable way, you could squeeze some caulk on to a pallet knife, but that is time consuming, and does not guarantee a good finish. If you have friends or a mate in the building trade, ask them, Its a straight forward task. No brain strain involved, and takes only minutes. I had the same job when I retired, done the whole house, took months, but the end results are worth the effort. If you are local to me not a problem. PM me.
 
Decorators caulk, the flexible type.

Cheap and like the man above said, run a thin bead into the crack with a gun.

The only thing I would do differently is to use my finger to push & smooth it into the crack. Then clean the excess off with a wet rag.


ETA: Where is @MrBane when you need him?
 
There is no other viable way, you could squeeze some caulk on to a pallet knife, but that is time consuming, and does not guarantee a good finish. If you have friends or a mate in the building trade, ask them, Its a straight forward task. No brain strain involved, and takes only minutes. I had the same job when I retired, done the whole house, took months, but the end results are worth the effort. If you are local to me not a problem. PM me.
Am using filler on a pallet knife but it's sh1t. Very kind of you to offer and help out but with the lock down not really viable (especially if you get nicked for non essential journey), am near'ish Portsmouth (Fareham) if you happen to be very close though :)
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
As above. Caulk is the answer here. Make sure you use flexible caulk as the normal stuff will just crack again.
 
Am using filler on a pallet knife but it's sh1t. Very kind of you to offer and help out but with the lock down not really viable (especially if you get nicked for non essential journey), am near'ish Portsmouth (Fareham) if you happen to be very close though :)
north west midlands.:(
 

anglo

LE
Finally got around to painting spare bedroom since daughter flew the nest uuuummm a few years ago. This room in in the upstairs of a dormer bungalow and where the sloping roof joins the corner of the outside wall has settled over the years and come away slightly. I have used normal filler higher up towards the roof but sanding it is going to be a pig. I wondered if I could just get away with painting in lower down where its narrower or is there a cunning simple method of filling for those with clarty great non delicate task hands?

Thanks in advance
Get some Acrylic caulk, clean the joint out, fill the joint up, but do not overfill,
take a piece of 25 mm plastic pipe and smooth down the joint down very carefully,
clean off excess as you go along {keep the plastic pipe clean of excess caulk,} you should
end up with the caulk just below the surface of the joint, let the caulk harden,
now paint just the caulk, give it two or three coats to make the surface level
let it dry then paint the wall
 
Thanks for all the replies folks, much appreciated :) May need to leave it with the lock down, no DIY places close enough for an essential journey.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top