Covid disinformation in the BAME community

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Worth a read and a new thread in its own right - not for any reasons of prejudice but to highlight what's happening in a particular affected group.
C&P in case it gets paywalled:
When a TikTok user filmed himself shouting "liar" at England's chief medical officer in a London food market this week, the video gave a glimpse of the fevered Covid conspiracies spreading among young people on social media.
Particularly in diverse parts of the capital, researchers are raising the alarm about online misinformation which is fuelling intense government mistrust and persuading Black and Asian minority ethnic (BAME) communities, already disproportionately affected by the virus, to shun the vaccine.
There are fears this is already having an impact. A study released last week by Nuffield Health, found just 20.5pc of black people had been vaccinated so far compared with 42.5pc of white people.
In North Croydon, one of the capital's most ethnically diverse constituencies, where more than 60pc of people are from Black, Asian or minority ethnicity (BAME) communities, the medical director of the local NHS Trust, Dr Nnenna Osuji, Medical Director of Croydon NHS Trust, said: "Right now, this misinformation is costing lives."

Inflaming distrust in government​

Outside the local Croydon University Hospital, passer-by Tim* outlines the far-fetched conspiracy that he believes lies behind the Covid-19 vaccine. He speaks slowly and carefully, as if trying to explain something complicated to a child without making them feel stupid. "You need to open your mind," he nudges.
Leaning against the wall that separates the hospital garden from the pavement thoroughfare, the 31-year-old falsely states the virus has been created by a "New World Order" to scare people into taking the vaccine. The vaccines are really an attempt to kill-off large numbers to get the human population under control and protect natural resources. He offers no evidence to support these beliefs.
Tim knows these ideas are considered conspiracies. They are entirely untrue. But false and dangerous opinions are finding new audiences as people, locked-down inside and stuck online, look for new ways to understand the pandemic. Will he take the vaccine? The short answer is no.
Ideas like Tim's are causing deep concern among Croydon's community leaders. "When we first did our survey, the word "culling" kept coming up over and over again," says Ima Miah, chief executive of Croydon's Asian Resource Centre, explaining how the false theory that Covid was a big government conspiracy to kill BAME people is a sentiment that still resonates.
Screenshot of a Facebook post showing an anti-vaccine conspiracy theory

When the World Economic Forum posted a video on its YouTube channel last week, advocating for a "Great Reset" or a new type of capitalism that prioritises the planet, conspiracy websites claimed this was proof of efforts to carry out population control in order to save the planet. The theory was referenced twice during The Telegraph's conversations with people on the street in Croydon.
Tackling online misinformation in communities like Croydon will be a major test for the Government. Conspiracies are running rampant on apps like WhatsApp and combating it requires deep and nuanced cultural knowledge.
Words such as "airborne" mean entirely different things in Bengali, while some groups, such as the south Asian Silhetti community, communicate in an oral language. "How do you get literature across to an oral language?" asks Miah. "You don't, you have to speak to them, you have to do videos."
One December survey, taken during an online event hosted by the Croydon BME forum, showed 34 per cent of attendees said they were not likely to take the vaccine, with 25 per cent still undecided.
The trend appears to be reflected in the number of people attending their vaccine appointments too. "We know we're not getting the same uptake across the entire population," says Croydon's Dr Osuji.
At the same time Croydon NHS was brainstorming how to combat social media misinformation, the local hospital experienced first-hand what it was like to feature in a viral anti-vaccine campaign.
On Dec 30, a video was posted to the anti-vaccine, anti-lockdown Instagram page, Stand Up Surrey, showing deserted corridors inside Croydon's University Hospital. Dr Osuji said the corridors were empty because patients were being cared for on dedicated Covid wards. "Remember that individuals won't be allowed to just wander onto the wards," she said.
These sections of the hospital, which are currently treating 200 people for Covid, are not mentioned in the video. "Despite the lies the Government are telling us the hospitals are not overwhelmed," said the man behind the camera, who never shows his face. The video has been watched more than 80,000 times on Instagram alone.
Screenshot of vaccine misinformation on Instagram

In response to a viral video which said the government was lying about Covid because the corridors at Croydon Hospital were empty, Dr Nnenna Osuji, Medical Director of Croydon NHS Trust, said: "We all need to just remember the set up of a hospital. I don't expect to see patients on the corridors in the middle of the night... Remember, of course, that individuals won't be allowed to just wander onto the wards."
Abbas Panjwani, a fact checker at Full Fact, says it is too early to understand how much online misinformation is fueling vaccine hesitancy. "However, it has big audiences. It has a lot of shares," he says.
Conspiracies are finding fertile territory among ethnic minority groups, which have long-standing grievances about racism and medical inequality.
"I don't trust the Government," said Lisa*, a 45-year-old support worker, passing Croydon hospital, who has already declined her vaccine. "I've heard a lot of conspiracy theories," she says, describing how six or seven warnings about the vaccine arrive every day over WhatsApp.
"Sometimes I don't have time to watch or read them all."
Researchers say the significance of encrypted apps like WhatsApp are making the phenomenon harder to track and understand. "WhatsApp is popular for everyone but it's very popular for ethnic minority communities," says Panjwani.
To study the opaque platform, groups like Full Fact have to rely on messages that are either screenshotted or forwarded to them. There's no search function. "Our ability to see what sort of misinformation is out there and affecting certain communities is limited," he says.
WhatsApp has tried to crack down on chain messages. After rumours spread by WhatsApp chains were linked to killings and lynching attempts in India, in 2019 the Facebook-owned company imposed global restrictions on forwarding, meaning a message forwarded five times from its original sender would be appear with a "Forwarded many times” labels.
However, still the misinformation keeps coming. Lisa* says some messages falsely claim the Government is trying to eradicate the current financial system so it can be replaced by Bitcoin; others mistakenly that artificial intelligence has made the large workforce redundant so the Government is attempting to use the vaccine as an attempt to wipe them out.
There is no evidence for any of the theories Lisa cites. But phenomenons like the pro-Trump QAnon movement demonstrate how even far-fetched ideas with no basis in reality can snowball online, eventually spiralling into violence.
Like QAnon, the anti-vaccination content spreading in Britain also features distortions that weave together misinformation and truth, making it difficult to disentangle the two.
In June, a speech by Matt Hancock triggered suspicion online after the health secretary suggested BAME groups could be prioritised for the vaccine once it had been approved by regulators, due to multiple studies showing these groups had been badly affected by the virus.
A screenshot of anti-vaccine misinformation on YouTube

On YouTube, a video misrepresenting a speech made by Health Secretary Matt Hancock went viral during the summer
In response, a video posted to YouTube blended Hancock's comments with false claims the Government wanted to trial untested and dangerous vaccines on Black Britons. Vaccines currently being deployed in the UK have all been approved by the medical regulator and there are currently no plans to prioritise people according to ethnicity.
“We’re not a vulnerable group when it comes to getting jobs, access to jobs, getting better healthcare, getting better social housing," said the British person filming the video. “Wake up people, especially Africans – they’re coming for you.” So far, the video has been watched almost 50,000 times.

The anti-vaccine influencer industry​

"This is not a grassroots thing of people spontaneously deciding that they don't trust vaccines," says Imran Ahmed, the CEO of the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH).
"This is a crisis driven by a very sophisticated bunch of actors, taking advantage of a moment in time, which they see as a great opportunity."
Ahmed describes an industry of influencers trying to "target" anti-vaccination messages at Black Britons and African Americans. "Who's one of the biggest proponents of the idea that black boys shouldn't be vaccinated? Robert F. Kennedy Jr," he says.
Members of the public wait in a queue to receive a dose of a Covid-19 vaccination, at a temporary centre set up at Selhurst Park football stadium, home ground of English Premiere League football team Crystal Palace, in Croydon

Members of the public wait in a queue to receive a dose of a Covid-19 vaccination, at a temporary centre set up at Selhurst Park football stadium, home ground of English Premiere League football team Crystal Palace, in Croydon CREDIT: AFP
President Kennedy's nephew, who has more than 700,000 followers on Instagram, has emerged as one of the most virulent anti-vaccine influencers online and his posts frequently falsely tell BAME groups they cannot trust the vaccine by referencing the Tuskegee syphilis study.
The 1932 medical study, where 399 African Americans with syphilis did not receive the correct treatment for the disease, has been transformed into an online rallying cry in both the US and UK to persuade Black people the vaccine can't be trusted. Medical experts stress the vaccine has already been consensually tested on people from a range of ethnicities and has been approved by regulators around the world.
"Think of [targeted misinformation] in the same way that you would the marketing of the product," says the CCDH's Ahmed. "The people at the very top, the anti-vaxxers, they tailor their messages for specific communities… This is about the micro targeting of messaging for communities to play on pre-existing concerns that they may have."
Croydon's community groups, churches and mosques have been mobilising against the misinformation, holding Zoom Q&As with local doctors and sharing short videos on WhatsApp immediately debunking false claims. Already they've seen success. Polls consistently show a drop in vaccine hesitancy when people can put their questions directly to local medical experts.
There have also been myths about the ingredients not being not permissible in Muslim, Jewish and some Christian communities.
Miah of the Asian Resource Centre, crediting a campaign by the British Islamic Medical Association, said these beliefs had now been demystified.
But community leaders expect the problem to get worse before it gets better as the NHS tries to encourage younger people, who spend more time on social media, to get vaccinated.
"You have a lot of young people say Covid is not real," says Andrew Brown, CEO of the Croydon BME forum, adding the group has even resorted to organising over-65 online events so the comment section on Zoom is not hijacked by young people persuading older attendees not to take the vaccine.
Croydon's Dr Osuji reiterates more work needs to be done. "We need to get the message out around what is accurate, around what is true."
*Names have been changed.
 
The problem with the covid conspiracies, or any conspiracy really, is that any attempt made by the government to counter these with facts will be met with cries of “Of course they’ll say that, it’s a cover up”.

If anyone else tries to argue against the conspiracies they are written off as a “sheep”.

If you ask for evidence to back up their claims then they just say that they won’t do your research for you, and to open your eyes etc.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
The irony of thinking the vaccine is designed to cull BAME's when in reality not getting vaccinated will hasten the self-imposed cull.

Darwin may well be walking amongst us.
 

Yokel

LE
Darwin may well be walking amongst us.

So is Vlad 'Poisoner' Putin!

The COVID-19 pandemic and other recent crises have shown that in many ways the West (defined by values - mostly relating to the importance of truth and the importance of the individual) to be under attack from regimes and leaders to whom these things are an anathema. Witness the constant attempts to undermine faith in our democratic systems, in the emergency services, in health services, in educational institutions, in our military capabilities, in industry.....

HM Government had produced a 'toolkit' - RESIST Counter Disinformation Toolkit

It can also be downloaded and viewed in PDF format. Posted from the thread in CA I started. Fortunately none of my BAME relatives fall for this shite.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Unfortunately anything with the word 'Government' in it is assumed to be disinformation in itself within certain demographics, sometimes by choice, sometimes by experience in countries of origin.
 
Darwin does what Darwin does The stupid die in disproportionately large numbers
That's a good thing.
Offset by them reproducing in disproportionately large numbers.

Darwin isn't winning the numbers game unfortunately.
 

Slime

LE
Worth a read and a new thread in its own right - not for any reasons of prejudice but to highlight what's happening in a particular affected group.
C&P in case it gets paywalled:
When a TikTok user filmed himself shouting "liar" at England's chief medical officer in a London food market this week, the video gave a glimpse of the fevered Covid conspiracies spreading among young people on social media.
Particularly in diverse parts of the capital, researchers are raising the alarm about online misinformation which is fuelling intense government mistrust and persuading Black and Asian minority ethnic (BAME) communities, already disproportionately affected by the virus, to shun the vaccine.
There are fears this is already having an impact. A study released last week by Nuffield Health, found just 20.5pc of black people had been vaccinated so far compared with 42.5pc of white people.
In North Croydon, one of the capital's most ethnically diverse constituencies, where more than 60pc of people are from Black, Asian or minority ethnicity (BAME) communities, the medical director of the local NHS Trust, Dr Nnenna Osuji, Medical Director of Croydon NHS Trust, said: "Right now, this misinformation is costing lives."

Inflaming distrust in government​

Outside the local Croydon University Hospital, passer-by Tim* outlines the far-fetched conspiracy that he believes lies behind the Covid-19 vaccine. He speaks slowly and carefully, as if trying to explain something complicated to a child without making them feel stupid. "You need to open your mind," he nudges.
Leaning against the wall that separates the hospital garden from the pavement thoroughfare, the 31-year-old falsely states the virus has been created by a "New World Order" to scare people into taking the vaccine. The vaccines are really an attempt to kill-off large numbers to get the human population under control and protect natural resources. He offers no evidence to support these beliefs.
Tim knows these ideas are considered conspiracies. They are entirely untrue. But false and dangerous opinions are finding new audiences as people, locked-down inside and stuck online, look for new ways to understand the pandemic. Will he take the vaccine? The short answer is no.
Ideas like Tim's are causing deep concern among Croydon's community leaders. "When we first did our survey, the word "culling" kept coming up over and over again," says Ima Miah, chief executive of Croydon's Asian Resource Centre, explaining how the false theory that Covid was a big government conspiracy to kill BAME people is a sentiment that still resonates.
Screenshot of a Facebook post showing an anti-vaccine conspiracy theory

When the World Economic Forum posted a video on its YouTube channel last week, advocating for a "Great Reset" or a new type of capitalism that prioritises the planet, conspiracy websites claimed this was proof of efforts to carry out population control in order to save the planet. The theory was referenced twice during The Telegraph's conversations with people on the street in Croydon.
Tackling online misinformation in communities like Croydon will be a major test for the Government. Conspiracies are running rampant on apps like WhatsApp and combating it requires deep and nuanced cultural knowledge.
Words such as "airborne" mean entirely different things in Bengali, while some groups, such as the south Asian Silhetti community, communicate in an oral language. "How do you get literature across to an oral language?" asks Miah. "You don't, you have to speak to them, you have to do videos."
One December survey, taken during an online event hosted by the Croydon BME forum, showed 34 per cent of attendees said they were not likely to take the vaccine, with 25 per cent still undecided.
The trend appears to be reflected in the number of people attending their vaccine appointments too. "We know we're not getting the same uptake across the entire population," says Croydon's Dr Osuji.
At the same time Croydon NHS was brainstorming how to combat social media misinformation, the local hospital experienced first-hand what it was like to feature in a viral anti-vaccine campaign.
On Dec 30, a video was posted to the anti-vaccine, anti-lockdown Instagram page, Stand Up Surrey, showing deserted corridors inside Croydon's University Hospital. Dr Osuji said the corridors were empty because patients were being cared for on dedicated Covid wards. "Remember that individuals won't be allowed to just wander onto the wards," she said.
These sections of the hospital, which are currently treating 200 people for Covid, are not mentioned in the video. "Despite the lies the Government are telling us the hospitals are not overwhelmed," said the man behind the camera, who never shows his face. The video has been watched more than 80,000 times on Instagram alone.
Screenshot of vaccine misinformation on Instagram

In response to a viral video which said the government was lying about Covid because the corridors at Croydon Hospital were empty, Dr Nnenna Osuji, Medical Director of Croydon NHS Trust, said: "We all need to just remember the set up of a hospital. I don't expect to see patients on the corridors in the middle of the night... Remember, of course, that individuals won't be allowed to just wander onto the wards."
Abbas Panjwani, a fact checker at Full Fact, says it is too early to understand how much online misinformation is fueling vaccine hesitancy. "However, it has big audiences. It has a lot of shares," he says.
Conspiracies are finding fertile territory among ethnic minority groups, which have long-standing grievances about racism and medical inequality.
"I don't trust the Government," said Lisa*, a 45-year-old support worker, passing Croydon hospital, who has already declined her vaccine. "I've heard a lot of conspiracy theories," she says, describing how six or seven warnings about the vaccine arrive every day over WhatsApp.
"Sometimes I don't have time to watch or read them all."
Researchers say the significance of encrypted apps like WhatsApp are making the phenomenon harder to track and understand. "WhatsApp is popular for everyone but it's very popular for ethnic minority communities," says Panjwani.
To study the opaque platform, groups like Full Fact have to rely on messages that are either screenshotted or forwarded to them. There's no search function. "Our ability to see what sort of misinformation is out there and affecting certain communities is limited," he says.
WhatsApp has tried to crack down on chain messages. After rumours spread by WhatsApp chains were linked to killings and lynching attempts in India, in 2019 the Facebook-owned company imposed global restrictions on forwarding, meaning a message forwarded five times from its original sender would be appear with a "Forwarded many times” labels.
However, still the misinformation keeps coming. Lisa* says some messages falsely claim the Government is trying to eradicate the current financial system so it can be replaced by Bitcoin; others mistakenly that artificial intelligence has made the large workforce redundant so the Government is attempting to use the vaccine as an attempt to wipe them out.
There is no evidence for any of the theories Lisa cites. But phenomenons like the pro-Trump QAnon movement demonstrate how even far-fetched ideas with no basis in reality can snowball online, eventually spiralling into violence.
Like QAnon, the anti-vaccination content spreading in Britain also features distortions that weave together misinformation and truth, making it difficult to disentangle the two.
In June, a speech by Matt Hancock triggered suspicion online after the health secretary suggested BAME groups could be prioritised for the vaccine once it had been approved by regulators, due to multiple studies showing these groups had been badly affected by the virus.
A screenshot of anti-vaccine misinformation on YouTube

On YouTube, a video misrepresenting a speech made by Health Secretary Matt Hancock went viral during the summer
In response, a video posted to YouTube blended Hancock's comments with false claims the Government wanted to trial untested and dangerous vaccines on Black Britons. Vaccines currently being deployed in the UK have all been approved by the medical regulator and there are currently no plans to prioritise people according to ethnicity.
“We’re not a vulnerable group when it comes to getting jobs, access to jobs, getting better healthcare, getting better social housing," said the British person filming the video. “Wake up people, especially Africans – they’re coming for you.” So far, the video has been watched almost 50,000 times.

The anti-vaccine influencer industry​

"This is not a grassroots thing of people spontaneously deciding that they don't trust vaccines," says Imran Ahmed, the CEO of the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH).
"This is a crisis driven by a very sophisticated bunch of actors, taking advantage of a moment in time, which they see as a great opportunity."
Ahmed describes an industry of influencers trying to "target" anti-vaccination messages at Black Britons and African Americans. "Who's one of the biggest proponents of the idea that black boys shouldn't be vaccinated? Robert F. Kennedy Jr," he says.
Members of the public wait in a queue to receive a dose of a Covid-19 vaccination, at a temporary centre set up at Selhurst Park football stadium, home ground of English Premiere League football team Crystal Palace, in Croydon

Members of the public wait in a queue to receive a dose of a Covid-19 vaccination, at a temporary centre set up at Selhurst Park football stadium, home ground of English Premiere League football team Crystal Palace, in Croydon CREDIT: AFP
President Kennedy's nephew, who has more than 700,000 followers on Instagram, has emerged as one of the most virulent anti-vaccine influencers online and his posts frequently falsely tell BAME groups they cannot trust the vaccine by referencing the Tuskegee syphilis study.
The 1932 medical study, where 399 African Americans with syphilis did not receive the correct treatment for the disease, has been transformed into an online rallying cry in both the US and UK to persuade Black people the vaccine can't be trusted. Medical experts stress the vaccine has already been consensually tested on people from a range of ethnicities and has been approved by regulators around the world.
"Think of [targeted misinformation] in the same way that you would the marketing of the product," says the CCDH's Ahmed. "The people at the very top, the anti-vaxxers, they tailor their messages for specific communities… This is about the micro targeting of messaging for communities to play on pre-existing concerns that they may have."
Croydon's community groups, churches and mosques have been mobilising against the misinformation, holding Zoom Q&As with local doctors and sharing short videos on WhatsApp immediately debunking false claims. Already they've seen success. Polls consistently show a drop in vaccine hesitancy when people can put their questions directly to local medical experts.
There have also been myths about the ingredients not being not permissible in Muslim, Jewish and some Christian communities.
Miah of the Asian Resource Centre, crediting a campaign by the British Islamic Medical Association, said these beliefs had now been demystified.
But community leaders expect the problem to get worse before it gets better as the NHS tries to encourage younger people, who spend more time on social media, to get vaccinated.
"You have a lot of young people say Covid is not real," says Andrew Brown, CEO of the Croydon BME forum, adding the group has even resorted to organising over-65 online events so the comment section on Zoom is not hijacked by young people persuading older attendees not to take the vaccine.
Croydon's Dr Osuji reiterates more work needs to be done. "We need to get the message out around what is accurate, around what is true."
*Names have been changed.

I have been following this saga from the start.
I’m sick of it now, and am bored of hearing ‘equality and diversity’ virtue signallers queue up to tell us that everyone is an equal, should be treated as an equal but that one section of society disproportionately don’t want to take the vaccine despite being at higher risk from Covid 19................

And, need a different approach to take it, and more encouragement (and more money and resources) in order to take the vaccine that the larger remainder of our ‘equal’ society.

I have heard how poor BAME people are more likely to refuse the vaccine, but not poor white people.
I’ve heard how BAME people in low skilled jobs are less likely to take the vaccine than low skilled white people.

Of course I’ve also heard that the virus is racist...........IF that were true we might need to ask what makes a simple thing like a virus with zero thought process dislike BAME people. :)

To enter a ludicrous theory I’ve heard how lots of BAME people cant see, hear or read the government message on vaccine as they don’t speak English (that makes sense so far, but wait), but that exact same non English speaking group have been put off the government message by hearing, seeing or reading the ‘scenarios’ of figures put out by Chris Witty and feel they were lied to!!!!............how did they get that message but not the others?

I’m NOT hearing how some in the BAME groups don’t understand about germs/vaccines or how diseases are spread, or how some sections see vaccines as the work of the Devil so won’t take them.

While it is very or easy to only blame the U.K. government or a distrust of white peoples this obviously ignores the high proportion of BAME people at all levels working for the NHS. It also neatly sidesteps the fact that many very recent arriving BAME groups to the U.K. come from third world countries, or countries with cultures or views diametrically opposed to Western European values.

There are of course people who are simply as thick as mince, and prefer to get their ‘facts’ from totally unqualified people on Facebook rather than listen to those who know what they are talking about.
 
Darwin does what Darwin does The stupid die in disproportionately large numbers
That's a good thing.

With CV19 causing an increase in erectile dysfunction, this may not remain the case.

Frankly, if they've been offered the vaccine in the correct sequence, and they made a personnel choice to not take it, then that's on them.

What I will object to is:
1) The insistence that it's down to racism.
2) Assorted troglodyte assholes persecuting ethnic minorities as there's a higher chance they are Covid Carriers, and thus seen as a higher risk due to the increased likelihood of them being carriers.
3) The eventual toll from long Covid that will have an effect being down to racism. Any Covid mitigation strategies will disproportionately effect the minorities, due to not accepting the vaccine. Eg: harder to obtain health insurance, or will have to undergo quarantine more often.

Part of the problem I suppose is the two Britain's we currently have. One can see frequent outbreaks of CV19 ripping through those ethnically diverse areas while the majority white areas are largely immune.

I guess this all comes down to Actions have Consequences.
 

WightMivvi

War Hero
I decided a while ago to “lead by example”, letting my family and friends know I’m getting the jab and being honest about any side-effects (e.g. feeling more crap than I can ever remember the day after the jab, but feeling fine the next day). I’m also throw in a bit of gentle mocking when anti-vax crap comes across my screen. For example, as I’ve had the AZ vaccine, I’m hoping I’ll become like Caesar in Planet of the Apes, but I’ll settle for not being a risk for others.

My idea is that those who are ambivalent will see a calm realistic and gentle approach that they can compare to the foam-flecked rantings of the conspiraloons.

In times of stress, people prefer to listen to the calm and confident rather than the hysterical.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I decided a while ago to “lead by example”, letting my family and friends know I’m getting the jab and being honest about any side-effects (e.g. feeling more crap than I can ever remember the day after the jab, but feeling fine the next day). I’m also throw in a bit of gentle mocking when anti-vax crap comes across my screen. For example, as I’ve had the AZ vaccine, I’m hoping I’ll become like Caesar in Planet of the Apes, but I’ll settle for not being a risk for others.

My idea is that those who are ambivalent will see a calm realistic and gentle approach that they can compare to the foam-flecked rantings of the conspiraloons.

In times of stress, people prefer to listen to the calm and confident rather than the hysterical.

Unfortunately in terms of social media, the conspiracy and anti vaccine lobby far outweigh the calm and gentle.
 
 
JRM does make a good point.

We need people like celebrities, communities leaders etc to get out and make the case the the vaccines are safe.
 
A study released last week by Nuffield Health, found just 20.5pc of black people had been vaccinated so far compared with 42.5pc of white people.

There's obviously something missing from this statement's context in the report. As the UK's official population is given as 65million (or so) we know we've vaccinated about 10-11million. That can't be 42% of the population.
 

Dread

LE
Why aren't BAME people getting the vaccine?

Easy: for a significant proportion of that population, they believe drivel like this, that science is racist and is all against them.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
There's obviously something missing from this statement's context in the report. As the UK's official population is given as 65million (or so) we know we've vaccinated about 10-11million. That can't be 42% of the population.
I assume those are the proportions of those vaccinated so far.
 
JRM does make a good point.

We need people like celebrities, communities leaders etc to get out and make the case the the vaccines are safe.
Imams?
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
With CV19 causing an increase in erectile dysfunction, this may not remain the case.

Frankly, if they've been offered the vaccine in the correct sequence, and they made a personnel choice to not take it, then that's on them.

What I will object to is:
1) The insistence that it's down to racism.
2) Assorted troglodyte assholes persecuting ethnic minorities as there's a higher chance they are Covid Carriers, and thus seen as a higher risk due to the increased likelihood of them being carriers.
3) The eventual toll from long Covid that will have an effect being down to racism. Any Covid mitigation strategies will disproportionately effect the minorities, due to not accepting the vaccine. Eg: harder to obtain health insurance, or will have to undergo quarantine more often.

Part of the problem I suppose is the two Britain's we currently have. One can see frequent outbreaks of CV19 ripping through those ethnically diverse areas while the majority white areas are largely immune.

I guess this all comes down to Actions have Consequences.
Yes, troglodyte assholes. But also people with a genuine concern.

I recounted the other week how a friend works across two Surrey care homes. Eight staff had had COVID. All were black. All of her African (and she was specific) staff were refusing to be vaccinated.

Personally, I’m not tracking this because I’m a troglodyte asshole*, I’m doing so because that demographic lives not too far from me. I have a partner in a risk group due to an auto-immune condition and I need to know what’s going on.

Stop press: the friend who works in care homes, as of last night, was in hospital on oxygen with COVID despite having been vaccinated. She has been scrupulously isolating outside work. The only place she could have caught it is at work. Forgive my anger and frustration.

If certain demographics are going to exclude themselves, they can only blame themselves and not others. The reason is not ‘racism’ but their own obdurate stupidity. That would be the same obdurate stupidity that drives them to think that any criticism of their behaviour is racism.



*I’m not suggesting that you were directing that at me, btw.
 
(Snip)

There are of course people who are simply as thick as mince, and prefer to get their ‘facts’ from totally unqualified people on Facebook rather than listen to those who know what they are talking about.

5B64A538-3A40-4F34-8C10-E92928892337.jpeg
ØA is a microbiologist, she can’t watch the ‘questions’ at the end of COVID briefings without turning purple...
 
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