COVID-19 and the effects on charities

I work for a charity, most of the major sources of income have dried up, and furlough has been the only thing to really help at the moment

That and to cut costs further they're pushing everyone onto a four day week whilst Covid-19 continues to play havoc with their finances

Moves are underway to introduce new income streams but won't happen until the later part of the year, but if there is one silver lining it's got rid of the complacency for now, no more spend like money is going out of fashion
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I work for a charity, most of the major sources of income have dried up, and furlough has been the only thing to really help at the moment

That and to cut costs further they're pushing everyone onto a four day week whilst Covid-19 continues to play havoc with their finances

Moves are underway to introduce new income streams but won't happen until the later part of the year, but if there is one silver lining it's got rid of the complacency for now, no more spend like money is going out of fashion
which sector is that in then (not asking for the actual name) out of curiosity.

I remember signing a thing for action aid back in the 90s thinking 3 quid a month that's okay - then I found out it takes over a year for the charity to get some money because the collectors were not volunteers at all they were paid.

I see job adverts for charity collectors who get £9 an hour, travel and accommodation paid and have chatted to a few, they have to meet targets or they get a warning then the sack.

hardly a charity IMO.

Canal and river trust have volunteers and paid collectors doing the same thing often at the same events which strikes me as a bit unfair.
 
Opposition in SA are fighting govt every step of the way. The cANCer regime are taking way too much pleasure in their new powers of total control and don't want to let go.

Fellow South African,

Shortly after launching a case against government’s ban on NGOs and church-based organisations distributing food to desperate and hungry people, we have received confirmation that our case will be heard on 19 June! Added to this, the court has issued an order preventing SAPS from enforcing any action against these organisations for the next month, until the case is heard.

This is very good news.

As a result of our legal action, funded with your help, soup kitchens that can run safely will no longer be forced to throw away donated food and watch people go hungry.

Support for our court action, challenging the irrational and unconstitutional aspects of the hard national lockdown, makes a difference.

• The day after we filed papers challenging the ban on e-commerce, the pressure saw government reverse their irrational ban, announcing that all products could be sold online.

• Our challenge in the High Court to the discriminatory use of coronavirus emergency relief funds has been set down for hearing on 1 June in the Pretoria High Court.

• Our challenges to the night curfew and the restriction on exercise hours helped see these irrational restrictions lifted in Lockdown Level 3. We will pursue them again in the event that South Africa goes back to Level 4 and these irrational restrictions resurface.

• We have applied for direct access to the Constitutional Court to challenge the constitutionality of the aspect of the Disaster Management Act that allows the National Command Council to make decisions as they please, without any checks and balances. We should receive confirmation from the court soon as to whether they will hear the case. In the event that the Constitutional Court refuses our application for direct access, we shall approach the High Court to hear the application.

Whilst it is a pity that we often have to resort to court action to have the opinions of South Africans and their businesses heard, and listened to, we will keep ensuring that the necessary court action is taken.

Your support is invaluable.
 
which sector is that in then (not asking for the actual name) out of curiosity.

I remember signing a thing for action aid back in the 90s thinking 3 quid a month that's okay - then I found out it takes over a year for the charity to get some money because the collectors were not volunteers at all they were paid.

I see job adverts for charity collectors who get £9 an hour, travel and accommodation paid and have chatted to a few, they have to meet targets or they get a warning then the sack.

hardly a charity IMO.

Canal and river trust have volunteers and paid collectors doing the same thing often at the same events which strikes me as a bit unfair.
Science and environmental education mainly
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
Science and environmental education mainly
real science or Faux science?

as in British heart foundation or Friends of the earth
 
real science and largely non political, it get's funding but is generally cross subsidised by commercial activities that are for now really suffering
 
lol, just compare Russia and USA
I have a friend in Russia and he says the goverment doesn't pay anything and only ounishes people for a simple walks, could you imagine this?
 

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