Covering a passageway - how to do the guttering?

#1
Greetings, DIY fans.

I need some help with a small DIY project...

I'm covering over a brick passageway to waterproof a wood store. All I am building is a sloped cover made out of that clear corrugated plastic, which will sit on top of a wooden frame.

The cover will be entirely within the passageway and will not overlap either of the two walls involved as they are too high. Wind whips down the passageway so the structure needs to be quite robust. That said, nothing will run down to floor level.

The cover needs guttering to run along the downslope side (along one of the walls). My question is - how to fit the guttering. Either it sits above the spars that will support the sheeting and I will need to thicken the spars at the downslope end to run underneath the guttering, or it sits below the spars and I have to waterproof the spars at the point where water flows past them and down to the guttering.

My feeling is that I am over-complicating this so am looking around for how people have tackled this problem... Any help?
 
#4
Take a picture of the existing walls/passage and use microsoft paint to 'draw in' what you are going to build. it may help with the visualisation.

Camm1
 
#5
Can you not bracket the guttering to the walls to avoid having to alter the support for the sheeting?

In fact can you not orient the sheeting with the passageway so it is flush to the brickwork, maybe some watertight filler to seal. Then run the guttering across the passageway at the lower end. Wouldn't this reduce the amount of guttering and water exposed supporting structure?
 
#6
Can you not bracket the guttering to the walls to avoid having to alter the support for the sheeting?

In fact can you not orient the sheeting with the passageway so it is flush to the brickwork, maybe some watertight filler to seal. Then run the guttering across the passageway at the lower end. Wouldn't this reduce the amount of guttering and water exposed supporting structure?
From what you've said, I'd go with this. Pick one end t lower and run the corrugations along the walls rather than to them. So the water runs along the longer length. At the lower end, just fit a normal guttering to shunt the water to a collection bin for use in the garden or jus tlet it fall like a waterfall.
 
#7
If you are only covering 4m of the passageway, why not slope the wriggly roof from end to end and have any guttering at the low end (obviously). PVC sheets are usually about 2m + long so you will need 2 with enough overlap. The width will be about right too.
Water only needs a 1 in 60 slope to run along so a steep grade isn't an issue.
 
#9
I agree,

Run the sheeting along the passage, sealed at he walls and have a gutter at the entrance across the passage. I would install a drain pipe though, no point in just building a waterfall.

Happy building, cutting, bleeding and swearing.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#11
Faced with the prospect of spending the next 10 years chasing leaks, I'd suggest GSI rather than DIY.

Unless you're a masochistic Yorkshireman.

Oh, and corrugated PVC looks crap - go for the cellular polycarbonate that is used on conservatory roofs, or you'll end-up sitting under it looking up at the crud that has accumulated in the dips.
 
#13
Faced with the prospect of spending the next 10 years chasing leaks, I'd suggest GSI rather than DIY.

Unless you're a masochistic Yorkshireman.

Oh, and corrugated PVC looks crap - go for the cellular uPVC that is used on conservatory roofs, or you'll end-up sitting under it looking up at the crud that has accumulated in the dips.
If you use that, and you do a good of sealling it down, you may find it gets quite warm under there... maybe good for a 'semi-green' house.
 
#15
If you use that, and you do a good of sealling it down, you may find it gets quite warm under there... maybe good for a 'semi-green' house.
Semi-green house!!………heretic……you should be stoned.

It’s a shed! Now go and stand in the corner and think about what you have said!
 
#16
Om reflection, I think that's it - the slope running with the passageway, not across it. There were some cosmetic reasons why this was not chosen but on reflection they aren't really valid.

That cellular UPVC stuff is much more expensive, it seems to me. It doesn't matter about it getting hot under there - the main aim is to keep wood dry so if it helped dry it out, so much the better.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#17
Having a flat sheet to butt up against the sides will eliminate having to take a chance on whether your wriggly-plastic meets the edge on an up- or down-turn, and makes it easier to get your flashing (I'm assuming that you want a reasonable seal to the edges) sorted.

I hope it keeps water out better than anything Westlands pushed-out the hangar door.

Don't forget to post pics on completion.
 
#18
If it's only 4m long why not slope it to one end and run the guttering along there?
 
#20
It sounds to me like you need to put lead flashing along the edges to waterproof it. You can either use lead flashing whch entails cutting a chase, fitting the flashing into it with wedges and then making good with sealant or you can get some self adhesive plastic flashing Providing the walls are even, that can work. Your guttering would run across the end with the downpipe running into a drain or even just onto the pavement.
 
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