Costco Tyres - rip off?

#81
Got my grandkids in the car with me often these days ...budget tyres aren't worth the risk
Great line from a motoring magazine article a few years back:
Customer: "I need some cheap tyres for my daughter's car"
Tyre salesman: "How cheap is your daughter?"

On the train recently,read an article about either a Lambo / Ferrari / ?? had a new model, whose tyres cost £2,000 - EACH.....yes it's a road going one, the usual 200mph + - must be a Squillionaire, of course,who will buy it !!
Pricey Tyres: 10 Most Expensive Tyres In The World

The Bugatti Veyron is a designed and developed by Volkswagen and is capable of sustaining speeds of 406km/h. For a high-speed machine such as this one, only Michelin can work that magic. Michelin Pilot Sport PAX (run flat) 245/690 R520 tyres in the front and 365/710 R540 rear tyres grace the Bugatti Veyron majestically.

These tyres cost $10,000 each
 
#85
#86
They'll be fine on a Picanto
Wouldn't put them on anything high performance but on run of the mill cars they'll do fine
Thanks for that,I am happy with my current tyres as my car is only 66 bhp and is used for City driving. Only on an odd occasion will it go on Dual carriageway.
Regarding price I would avoid Budget tyres especially names I have never heard of,as no matter what speed your doing. It's only the rubber between you and the road that keeps you safe or as safe as you can be.
 
#89
OK, gen question. You think this was advice from back when all cars were rear wheel drive and traction on the back wheels was most important? Because as a layman I couldn't really give a rats if a back tyre blows. No drama. If a front tyre blows when I am hoofing into a bend with a cattle truck coming the other way... That's a Gwyneth Paltrow OSCAR speech moment and tell me Mam I loved her.
As has already been said, it's all due to tread condition.

The general premise is that, in the wet, you are better to lose traction on the front, not the rear, because understeer is easier for the general, everyday, driver to handle than oversteer.

If the fronts lose traction then car understeers and ploughs on in a straight line, until enough speed has bled off to allow the tyres to regain traction and the car starts to turn again. That's all you have to do for understeer, lose speed, even my wife can deal with that, and it's a natural reaction, people bang on the brakes, and with all cars having ABS these days....you can see how that works eh?

However, if the rears lose traction, then the back starts to swap position with the front of the car. Now you are in the position of judicious use of the throttle, along with opposite lock etc to try to bring the car back under control . Backing off the accelerator or hitting the brakes (most people reaction) is simply going to make things worse.

That's why the current advice is that the tyres with the best tread go on the rear.

To those out there that say cheap, chinese, ditchfinders are ok....yup, they probably are for ninety nine percent of your drivng.

However, it's that one percent that will make the difference. Simply put, if a well made tyre can stop you two or three meters shorter, that's two or three meters that you aren't in the car, or lorry, in front of you.

It's not about passing an MOT.

Only two things on your car really, really, need to work, first time, every time. Brakes and tyres. If the car doesn't go, well, you might be late, but at least you, or someone else, won't die from it. If either the brakes or the tyres don't work, then someone really might just die.

When you are looking at tyres, is there really such a difference between the "budget" makes that you have never heard of and are cheap for a reason, to the better known and better developed "mid range" tyres, price wise? Maybe a fiver or tenner a corner?

Anyway, the mid to good ranges are much more likely to last longer.

Remember the adage," buy cheap, buy twice"
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#90
Another point to consider is tread depth, I may have quoted this before, but where I used to work one of the lads owned a nice Mitsubishi high performance saloon car, I think it was a V6 2.8 or something

I was walking back from the builders merchants round the corner and decided to sit down and skive for half an hour on the bench nearby, I noticed an old landie trundling along towing a trailer, 20 to 25 mph come from the same builders merchants as I had been to
then I heard a car shoot up to the junction to my left ( ten feet away) and saw the white mitsubishi pull out a bit quick, but the wheels did not seem to grip very well, then a bloody big bang as the Landie whacked it hard
Landrover sustained fairly minor cosmetic damage Bumper wing and grill and lights
Mitsubishi beyond repair drive shaft pushed into the engine and oil everywhere, door pushed in and front wing and bonnet
I go over to help, Landie driver Ok just annoyed but he has to call the old bill as he is an off duty copper
Cops turn up, I get some stuff to soak the oil up as its on our company exit, right by the sign,
landie eventually moves off, and the Mitsubishi gets towed
Lad never collected the full amount in insurance, they paid for the Landrover repairs
his front tyres were just on the legal ;limit and the rears likewise, plus the rears had been on the front and feathered on the inside
seems the manufactures stated that tyres should be replaced at 2mm due to its high performance
Insurance company pointed out some wording about it
I think he lost 60 percent of the cars value
 
#91
Apologies - 4000km life.
Yep - a lovely 2500 miles between replacements!
They'd last about 15 minutes at 'full chat', apparently.
But as the fuel ran out in 10 minutes at full chat, it wasn't an issue.
Must try harder - as my weird sense of humour flew way ahead,asking for it in English, is my way of reclaiming that which I have not been comfortable with......

Blame it on Brexit - I use Feet / Inches / Yards ---also MPH not KM's - even speak to Grocers in Pounds and Ounces - It's just me getting ready for the Big Day !! ^^

I did hear sometime ago, that the Boss of VAG drives one to work daily, and it's apparently clocked at near maximum - hate to be on the Autobahn when he's travelling at that rate of knots !!
 
#92
Bit of a 'Thread Drift'....

Not only does the Insurer of your car EXPECT you to have the correct tyres on it - but you should also inform them of ANY additions / alterations to the car, which takes it OUT of the agreed value & performance, as per it's original spec.....I didn't know that ( apart from the obvious increase in performance by enlarging the BHP...) - ignorance will cost you - IF - your unfortunate in having an accident...!!

Insurers also want to know if you get any speeding / careless driving tickets / as it will affect your premiums - immediately - seems that drivers of High Performance Cars get a caning for almost anything ( Except the Boss of VAG )
Perhaps @BossHogg can add anything extra ??

Thread Drift over - with apologies.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
#93
It's worth mentioning that tyres do age thus getting hard, noisy and less grippy. I bought a very low mileage Honda Integra a while back and though that the low humming noise was the rear wheel bearings going, but bought the car because it would have been an easy job to fix. It turns out that the rear tyres were just old and, when replaced transformed the handling and took away all noise from the back end.
 
#94
It's worth mentioning that tyres do age thus getting hard, noisy and less grippy. I bought a very low mileage Honda Integra a while back and though that the low humming noise was the rear wheel bearings going, but bought the car because it would have been an easy job to fix. It turns out that the rear tyres were just old and, when replaced transformed the handling and took away all noise from the back end.
Recommended to change motorhome tyres no more than 7 years old...pricey, but my old van is 2003, and still valued at about 27k...again, why would you risk it
The old hymer I had , and bumped, was K reg still worth over 12k, when the insurance assessor came first thing he checked was the age and condition of the tyres
 
#95
Must try harder - as my weird sense of humour flew way ahead,asking for it in English, is my way of reclaiming that which I have not been comfortable with......
Hey, I'd just mastered pounds shillings and pence, when they decimalised.
THEN, after mastering lbs, oz, ft, stone, cwt, HP etc, we moved to a metric nation.
Then spent a while in the states, where gallons, quarts etc are dif'rent.
Confused? Now add knots to the equation.
I 'speak' them all!
Thank god for the internetz, and instant ability to convert ft/lbs to Nm!
I did hear sometime ago, that the Boss of VAG drives one to work daily, and it's apparently clocked at near maximum - hate to be on the Autobahn when he's travelling at that rate of knots !!
Christ - try explaining THAT to our local muppets... What is a knot per hour? and why is a nautical mile not 1.609km?
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#96
Recommended to change motorhome tyres no more than 7 years old...pricey, but my old van is 2003, and still valued at about 27k...again, why would you risk it
The old hymer I had , and bumped, was K reg still worth over 12k, when the insurance assessor came first thing he checked was the age and condition of the tyres
Most Hymers run very near to the total weight loading of the tyres before you put all your junk in,those tyres work hard for their living
 
#98
Most Hymers run very near to the total weight loading of the tyres before you put all your junk in,those tyres work hard for their living
JUNK!!! JUNK!!! how very dare you sir... that generator and electric oven are essential parts of the vehicle CES, whether I have used them or not in the last 10 years let's not get into the auxiliary car I pull behind , just in case we need it
 
#99
Recommended to change motorhome tyres no more than 7 years old...pricey, but my old van is 2003, and still valued at about 27k...again, why would you risk it
The old hymer I had , and bumped, was K reg still worth over 12k, when the insurance assessor came first thing he checked was the age and condition of the tyres
Seven years is the commonly held 'time to change them' age of tyres that will never actually wear out through use. Dunlop suggest ten years and a lot of caravanners work on five years.

My caravan tyres expire by virtue of age this month still looking perfect. The spare has never ever been used but likewise, it too will be renewed.

Happily, being white van man van tyres, they are not an arm and a leg... especially given the number of years they are in use.
 

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