Cornet bond and his charger

#1
Can any one on here tell me the name of the charger mentioned in this all too brief paragraph describing the sinking of HMS Birkenhead and in particular Cornet Bond? I'm expecting a dozen or so random horse names ranging fron 'Trigger' to 'Silver' etc but just maybe someone knows.........

TY

DS

"There were no lifebelts, except only one, privately owned. It was the property of Cornet Bond of the 12th Lancers. He made his way ashore to find his horse waiting for him."
 
#3
Evostick?

The wiki page on the loss of the BIRKENHEAD is quite good: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Birkenhead_(1845)

Hadn't realised that you pongoes invented 'women and children first'.
 
#4
All I could find:

He remained for some time on the beach until twelve or fourteen men were collected, and, seeing no prospect of further survivors started with them and Cornet Bond, of the 12th Lancers, in search of food and shelter, of which they were deplorably in want. Great was their surprise to recognise in a horse, which came neighing up, Cornet Bond's charger, cast overboard with the other animals, but who had swam safely to shore.

As Cornet Bond of the 12th Lancers he played a brave man's part in that great catastrophe, when the Birkenhead, with its cargo of human souls, went down, and he was one of the fortunate 184 who survived from the 683 on board. Not only did he gallantly save women and children in the early hours of that February morning, sixty-four years ago, but at the last moment, regardless of his own life, he went down to the saloon to rescue a child, and afterwards swam a couple of miles through the shark-infested waters to the beach. Even when he had reached the neighbourhood of the shore, after that terrible buffeting in the tumbling seas, he became entangled in seaweed, and it was only by superhuman determination and strength that he managed to gain the land. In the Providence of God he was preserved to take part not only in the Kaffir war, but the Crimean campaign, the Indian Mutiny, and other conflicts, and everywhere he acquitted himself right gallantly. He spent the evening of his days in the quietude of The Argory, surrounded by hosts of friends, and his death was sincerely mourned though he had long passed the allotted span of years.
A Newspaper account and clipping of the wreck:

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cg...ZTR19070302.2.56&l=mi&e=-------10--1----0-all


Interesting and very sad story.
 
#5
P2000 said:
Evostick?

The wiki page on the loss of the BIRKENHEAD is quite good: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Birkenhead_(1845)

Hadn't realised that you pongoes invented 'women, children and horses first'.

Fixed it for you! :lol:
 
#6
P2000 said:
Hadn't realised that you pongoes invented 'women and children first'.
Hence the expression "Birkenhead Drill", it's all to do with being British......and being a gentleman...

Henry sits back with a satisfied smug grin, knowing that in the lottery of life, he was born British...
 

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