Copyright Law!

#1
Anyone here know anything about copyright law?


Suffice to say, I have just heard certain alternative song lyrics on television, in the news - recorded as a song - that I wrote on this site in April of this year.

An exact quote of my lyrics too!

Now, I was more than happy to put forward lyrics for this song for people who I would regard as fellow users of this site (and therefore friends) to use at a certain sporting event...

However, when its now being used by a certain large international news agency, and clearly someone is going to be paid for singing it - then It seems to me that I could at least be given the courtesy of them PM'ing me to ask my permission - anyone know what I should do to follow this up?

cheers all

L
 
#3
Technically it is almost certain that you are entitled to protection under the copyright laws, and possibly also under performing rights rules as well. But, and there is a big but here, it can be extremely difficult (and sometimes expensive) to enforce your rights. If you want more help or info PM me.
 
#4
Knowing the Beeb they would have just paid session musicians a one of payment for recording it.

When the song was on here for everyone to see there was no copyright logo on display, I'd say your shafted mate. dont know if you can retrospectivley copyright it (provided the Beeb haven't already done it)

re-edit your post, add the copyright symbol (letter c in circle) followed by Labrat and everyone else who's versus made the final cut, then find a media lawyer.
 
#5
wet_blobby said:
Knowing the Beeb they would have just paid session musicians a one of payment for recording it.

When the song was on here for everyone to see there was no copyright logo on display, I'd say your shafted mate. dont know if you can retrospectivley copyright it (provided the Beeb haven't already done it)

re-edit your post, add the copyright symbol (letter c in circle) followed by Labrat and everyone else who's versus made the final cut, then find a media lawyer.
No need, copyright automatically exists whether the copyright symbol is displayed or not. But not sure how "fair usage" would apply in this case.
 
#6
Do you have a link to your post?

Is the news clip anywhere on the net yet?

I have no idea about copyright law, I'm just curious.
 
#7
You're not really going to court over this:


labrat said:
Well, the best songs can go on for ever and ever, with as many verses/choruses as you like - so the ideal base to work from is clear....


What shall we do with the captured sailors


so, for starters I'll give you verse one!

take away his i pod and make him blubber
take away his i pod and make him blubber
take away his i pod and make him blubber
earlie in the morning

chorus
OOh'ray and faye is gopping
OOh'ray and faye is gopping
OOh'ray and faye is gopping
earlie in the morning
Would you really want your name associated with it? :)
 
#8
Hey, if the fecking lying bbc twats are going to use my work, then they can at least be expected to ask permission and make a donation to my chosen charity!
 
#10
Can you prove that you wrote those lyrics? Typing them on here is no proof that you are the owner of such lyrics.
When I used to play in a band I would send all new songs to myself in the post by registered mail after I had recorded them. Then if I was ever going to take someone to court for copyright theft all I had to do was take in the unopened package containing the CD which had a date stamped on the top by the post office proving that I had written said songs on or before a certain date.
Never actually tested that this works but everyone in a band does it.
 
#11
supermark500 said:
Can you prove that you wrote those lyrics? Typing them on here is no proof that you are the owner of such lyrics.
When I used to play in a band I would send all new songs to myself in the post by registered mail after I had recorded them. Then if I was ever going to take someone to court for copyright theft all I had to do was take in the unopened package containing the CD which had a date stamped on the top by the post office proving that I had written said songs on or before a certain date.
Never actually tested that this works but everyone in a band does it.
Surely the fact that his post on ARRSE also has a time and date stamp would make it just as valid proof of date of authorship as if he had sent himself a registered letter containing the text, and a good deal easier and cheaper to boot?
 
#12
What is plagiarism
Many people think of plagiarism as copying another's work, or borrowing someone else's original ideas. But terms like "copying" and "borrowing" can disguise the seriousness of the offense:

According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, to "plagiarize" means
1. to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own
2. to use (another's production) without crediting the source
3. to commit literary theft
4. to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.

In other words, plagiarism is an act of fraud. It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward.

But can words and ideas really be stolen?
According to U.S. law, the answer is yes. The expression of original ideas is considered intellectual property, and is protected by copyright laws, just like original inventions. Almost all forms of expression fall under copyright protection as long as they are recorded in some way (such as a book or a computer file).

All of the following are considered plagiarism:
turning in someone else's work as your own
copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit
failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not (see our section on "fair use" rules)

Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources. Simply acknowledging that certain material has been borrowed, and providing your audience with the information necessary to find that source, is usually enough to prevent plagiarism.
http://www.plagiarism.org/learning_center/what_is_plagiarism.html

The above cites US law (I couldn't be bothered to find something similar that specifically relates to England), but I'd guess that we have a similar principle.

"So M'lud, Mr Labrat claims breach of copyright, but he offered the first verse freely with the words "so, for starters I'll give you verse one!"

Furthermore, the chorus is clearly plagiarism. Approximately 50% of the words are those of a pre-existing song and the last line is an exact copy.

Mr Labrat has not acknowledged the pre-existence of the sonnet, therefore M'lud, I move that these proceedings be dropped in advance of possible proceedings being made against Mr Labrat by the descendents of the as yet unidentified original writer."

:twisted:
 

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