Cooling while in a vest?

Its been rather toasty the last few days, and my current job has me outside, in a city centre, which means all the joys of reflected heat and no wind. Equally, I'm wearing an equipment vest. I'm out in it for a good four hours usually, and I'm getting seriously over heated, my water is vanishing with alarming speed, and I'm sweating several buckets.

Now knowing that this has been an issue for the Army in very hot places, with more load than I'm carrying. I figured you lot will have more experience than me, so I might ask some advice, or pray there's a magic bullet item that's cheap enough for me to buy to solve the problem (A quick google shows there's lots of Tacticool gear claiming to be the answer from the US, all of which makes me suspicious).

So any help for a rather half baked and very sweaty human?
Thanks.
 
Its been rather toasty the last few days, and my current job has me outside, in a city centre, which means all the joys of reflected heat and no wind. Equally, I'm wearing an equipment vest. I'm out in it for a good four hours usually, and I'm getting seriously over heated, my water is vanishing with alarming speed, and I'm sweating several buckets.

Now knowing that this has been an issue for the Army in very hot places, with more load than I'm carrying. I figured you lot will have more experience than me, so I might ask some advice, or pray there's a magic bullet item that's cheap enough for me to buy to solve the problem (A quick google shows there's lots of Tacticool gear claiming to be the answer from the US, all of which makes me suspicious).

So any help for a rather half baked and very sweaty human?
Thanks.
A wicking layer and drink fûcktons of water.

Not much help, but thats what got me through a few tours.
 
Haven't tried it, but it sounds interesting.

Edit: You could probably get similar results with those cooling elements for cool boxes. A lot cheaper too.
 
Its been rather toasty the last few days, and my current job has me outside, in a city centre, which means all the joys of reflected heat and no wind. Equally, I'm wearing an equipment vest. I'm out in it for a good four hours usually, and I'm getting seriously over heated, my water is vanishing with alarming speed, and I'm sweating several buckets.

Now knowing that this has been an issue for the Army in very hot places, with more load than I'm carrying. I figured you lot will have more experience than me, so I might ask some advice, or pray there's a magic bullet item that's cheap enough for me to buy to solve the problem (A quick google shows there's lots of Tacticool gear claiming to be the answer from the US, all of which makes me suspicious).

So any help for a rather half baked and very sweaty human?
Thanks.
There are no easy solutions, if you're in the sun you must wear a hat - floppy boonie type works best for me.
You have to hydrate, hydrate and hydrate all the time. Whatever you choose to wear, bring a spare set to change into after you finish.
 
not taking the piss here but there must be somethig H&S wise, ircc there were signs about sun/heat expourse, water intake on tour whilst your not on tour.im sure there must be something, any nebosh pundits out there
 
Wet shemagh and make sure you have a bit of a breeze to evaporate and cool it.
 
Last edited:

philc

LE
When in hot places I used to lean over the side rail with a slight breeze and look towards which ever port it was and think someone is getting it tonight.

Does that help
 
If you wear a shemagh and you're working with equipment/machnery make damn sure all the ends/corners are safely tucked away.
Generally speaking, wetting your hat as a means of cooling works better in arid heat conditions. My UK family tell me it's very humid there.
 
A wicking layer and drink fûcktons of water.

Not much help, but thats what got me through a few tours.
I found that out the hard way today. I went out with a 500ml bottle today. That lasted about 90 minutes. Your post reminded me to order something a bit more substantial and insulated. But even then we're running into the issue of limited space to carry.

Please excuse the bone question, what do you mean by wicking layer?

Haven't tried it, but it sounds interesting.

Edit: You could probably get similar results with those cooling elements for cool boxes. A lot cheaper too.
I saw that on the google, and became instantly suspicious as they kept on using the phrase "operator" and dressed the advert up as an article. Although I did think exactly the same thing, stick an icepack down my chest...

There are no easy solutions, if you're in the sun you must wear a hat - floppy boonie type works best for me.
You have to hydrate, hydrate and hydrate all the time. Whatever you choose to wear, bring a spare set to change into after you finish.
Uniform includes a baseball cap, which is about all I'm allowed to wear.

not taking the piss here but there must be somethig H&S wise, ircc there were signs about sun/heat expourse, water intake on tour whilst your not on tour.im sure there must be something, any nebosh pundits out there
Yup, I'll bet it does and will talk all about the need for regular water stops and the like... All of which are closed due to CV19. I'll have a check shortly (I'm NEBOSH qualified myself).

Wet shemagh and mak sure you have a bit of a breeze to evaporate and cool it.
Middle of a city centre, lots of tall buildings. I'd get more air moving if I farted.
Reminds me of the old Wot'a'mess books when I was a kid. The dog logically deducts that cooling is provided by air moving past. If the air will not move past him, then he should move past the air really really fast...

When in hot places I used to lean over the side rail with a slight breeze and look towards which ever port it was and think someone is getting it tonight.

Does that help
Well we do have a river, but in my situation its less helpful than you might think.

If you wear a shemagh and you're working with equipment/machnery make damn sure all the ends/corners are safely tucked away.
Generally speaking, wetting your hat as a means of cooling works better in arid heat conditions. My UK family tell me it's very humid there.
Humidity this morning was about 95%, it dropped through out the day.
 
Mix some electrolyte rehydration into your water, you can get it from any chemist
But mix it correctly, don't try and make it stronger like squash, or as a mate found out on selection, it can mess you up!
 
Uniform includes a baseball cap, which is about all I'm allowed to wear.
Not ideal due to it affording no protection for the ears and back of the neck. Hope at least it's not of the dryfit type which basically clings to your head, thereby conducting the heat straight into your head.
 
Are you an employee or a contractor? If you are an employee, your employer is responsible for providing adequate protective gear and access to water.
 
OP, I notice you are out for four hours or so. Do not forget to eat, as it’s not just about hydration. Too many people (Brits in particular) fall into the trap of not eating in heat because “it’s too hot”. Your body still needs nutrition and will be working hard in the heat. It needs feeding and watering.
 
For many years they have tried to implement a cooling system for under the EOD suit, it never met with much success, but I don’t know how things have moved on in the last 10 years.

The UBACS worked well with Osprey + kit, whatever that was made out of might be worth looking at.

Other than that it’s all about personal management. Finding the best clothes (I always found belly Hansen cool was great). Fluid intake and importantly food (a lot of people forget). Factor in breaks and keep an eye on your team.
 

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