Contents of a 'Go-Pack'

I quite like this chaps YouTube channel.

He does seem to have a bit of a fascination for tying bowline knots (see his other videos), but his SHTF bag seems quite sane and reasonable to me (for a US situation).

I would also stash a Glock 26/36 with a spare mag. Part of the problem out here is large stray bitey dogs and other other 4 legged critters.
 
I would also stash a Glock 26/36 with a spare mag. Part of the problem out here is large stray bitey dogs and other other 4 legged critters.
He does mention at the end of the video he has lawful concealed carry permits for the states he lives and works in...

I would imagine something is under his USMC hoodie.

But he presents as quite a sane level headed chap.
 
He does mention at the end of the video he has lawful concealed carry permits for the states he lives and works in...

I would imagine something is under his USMC hoodie.

Yes but I would just leave it packed in the bag and only take it out to shoot and clean. I got tired of having to wear certain clothes all the time for CC, so I just have a pistol for each vehicle that stays in it. Call me a heretic but I don’t carry everywhere I go, but I do have access to one if needed.

But he presents as quite a sane level headed chap.
 
@LJONESY

Sounds perfectly sensible. Works in the UK too.

 
well, it'sa bit of fun, a hobby...and for some an obsession.
We're more about the slingshots than the Sigs, mind
 
I am shocked about how many preppers the U.K. seems to have, and here I thought it was an American monopoly.
I have mates in Germany who are well prepped too - a loose collection of serving and former military who know each other and have a couple of RV locations should anything ever happen.

well, it'sa bit of fun, a hobby...and for some an obsession.
We're more about the slingshots than the Sigs, mind
Crossbow's, told ya. And for those wot like's the SA80 try this:

 
That is a great movie btw!
Long story cut short, I got drunk with some Dutch, Spanish and Italian counterparts under circumstances that shall remain a bit vague.

We did a fair amount of damage to a hotel bar, and when we were all properly approaching a point of serenity; this Dutch chap said (in great seriouness, and very heavy Cloggie accent), "Have you ever seen the film "Hot Fuzz"?"

This then led to an impromptu performance of the finest moments by myself and my new Dutch mate, to the utter incredulity of the Carabinieri and Guardia Civil who clearly were wandering WTF was going on.

Ah, happy days. Until my DI saw the state of me the next morning.
 
I have mates in Germany who are well prepped too - a loose collection of serving and former military who know each other and have a couple of RV locations should anything ever happen.
And I thought all that Werewolf and Gladio stuff stopped years ago....
 
Long story cut short, I got drunk with some Dutch, Spanish and Italian counterparts under circumstances that shall remain a bit vague.

We did a fair amount of damage to a hotel bar, and when we were all properly approaching a point of serenity; this Dutch chap said (in great seriouness, and very heavy Cloggie accent), "Have you ever seen the film "Hot Fuzz"?"

This then led to an impromptu performance of the finest moments by myself and my new Dutch mate, to the utter incredulity of the Carabinieri and Guardia Civil who clearly were wandering WTF was going on.

Ah, happy days. Until my DI saw the state of me the next morning.
Excellent!
I do very much hope you uttered the immortal
P I Staker? GROW UP!
and
Oh, fcukoff, grasshopper! :)
 
Excellent!
I do very much hope you uttered the immortal
P I Staker? GROW UP!
and
Oh, fcukoff, grasshopper! :)
Sadly my favourite remains,

"Skid marks!".


Probs why I never got any further with the tidy lady Dutch DC I was trying to impress.
 
Car key and debit card.


Just in case the plan of "drive to a hotel" doesn't work, then I have a rat pack, hexi, water and a few other bits in the boot and warm stuff in the winter.
 
'Bore you to tears' Ray Mears. He does know his stuff, but only knowing his stuff won't keep you alive. If you like a largely vegetable-based diet, Ray's your man.
Eh? He's quite happy fishing, hunting and all sorts.

It is not all just digging up roots and eating berries.
 
A blatant re-post but, given the conversation, relevant.

Having experienced the Tohoku 'quake in Tokyo a few years back my attitude to 'prepping' has changed somewhat.

Like most people, and despite having a Japanese wife who should be clued up about this stuff, I never really took it all that seriously. In the house we had 1 x emergency kit - a rucksack issued by Lehman Brothers to staff which consisted of a hard hat, torch, power bars, blanket, med kit and water sachets - and 1x British army issue ration pack (menu 'A' iirc, which shows how old it was). And whatever food was in the cupboards (not a lot).

Oh, and a 10 week old baby - but clearly I had never really factored that into the plan.

The quake struck mid Friday afternoon. By 6pm every local combini (convenience store) had empty shelves. I was lucky, I could walk home, a rarity in a city the size of Tokyo. Anyone who could drive out did, or tried. The roads were gridlocked and people were jumping out of cars to buy supplies from any combini that they saw. Most people walked, in many cases for several hours, and, again, sustained themselves from combinis. None of these were restocked for days after the event.

On Saturday water was being rationed in shops, only 1 bottle per person. We got double because of the baby.

On Sunday morning the local 'big' supermarket was virtually empty. Central Tokyo is not densely residential, like the outskirts, so it still had some stocks, although again rationing was in place for rice and water.

We decamped to Osaka on Sunday evening, I wasn't going to stay in Tokyo with a 10 week old baby not knowing what was happening with the nuclear reactors. We were lucky that we had the option, and the funds, to do it. By Wednesday there was not a single hotel room to be had in Osaka and every flight from Tokyo to pretty much anywhere else was booked solid.

Three lessons learned from all that:

1. Most people are not even prepared at a basic level and few have more than a few days supplies in hand. Fewer still have even that in water

2. In an age of 'just in time' logistics, if the shtf then everyone else will be heading for the nearest food store and they will empty of pretty much everything in hours. If supply lines are dislocated (we were lucky in Tokyo that they were back to normal in about a week) then that's it. After that people will start looking for other sources of food and water, such as restaurants and private residences.

3. Having a minimum of 7 days food and water on hand at all times is just basically sensible. I live in an apartment in HK so cannot go full on 'Yank survivalist' and fill a basement with bullets n beans, but 7-14 days will give anyone enough of a buffer to enact a 'Plan-B' if needed. Also keep as much cash as you feel comfortable having in the house, if the ATMs / payments networks go down, even for a while, you won't be able to buy last minute supplies. If you have young kids you really need to factor that in too, baby milk will command a premium in a post-apocalyptic world p of



Addendum: Having since moved to a rural area things have changed on a few fronts. We have a close-knit group of neighbours so, I am sure, would have collective supplies and defence. However the shops are smaller so would necessitate a much quicker visit to liberate what we might need, again strength in numbers might be an advantage here. There are farms and fishing as well as water supply (if uncontaminated) which might ease the pressure.

However I am still keenly aware that we could probably only eke out a week - 2 kids now and the little buggers will insist on eating - so really should have more preparations in place. Typhoons are probably the biggest threat these days domestically so one should, reasonably, imagine that things would be back into place within a week even after a mega-storm. The only other threat that I can think of would be following a break down in international relations between China and (insert name here) in which case we would have bigger problems - but probably longer to prepare.
 
The way I look at it, if you don't need to move, don't. Being on the move your more vulnerable to elements etc. That being said the planned eventual family motor home purchase is part of the redundancy plan.

We're pretty lucky in Lower North island in New Zealand. Our greatest risks are natural being earthquakes, flooding. The house is pretty well set up to take a good shake and flooding isn't really a risk for us. Being semi rural on a couple acres we have our own water and septic systems. Our only limitation is the power to run the water pumps from the tanks which I'll look to sort with a small generator. Food isn't really an issue with about a couple weeks food/dry stores in the house, but if it gets tight we have redundancy walking around our paddock and a pretty good vege patch.
 
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