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Considering RMP

#1
I am considering joining the RMP as a solider, and was wondering if anyone could give me some USEFUL insight into the actual duties and deployments I should expect. Are there any specific upsides and downsides that I should be aware of? How are they deployed, obligations on operations such as Afghan etc?

I'm somewhat torn between choosing RMP and Signals, and would like as much information as possible before diving in. Recruitment staff can be very unhelpful sometimes, unfortuantely. Usually seem to just direct you to the nearest brochure which answers practically nothing.

Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
#2
30 yrs of commissioned infantry service speaking.

In all that time, I never had a satisfactory professional experience of RMP on duty.

If you want to soldier, join a soldiering Unit. If you want to be a policeman - join a police force.

On the other hand, I had 2 very good years on attachment with R Signals (sadly they were the years of Duran Duran, but you can't have everything).

Intelligent, switched on, technically competent, VERY surprisingly wide employment opportunities . . . with a few guys who thought it cool to wear carpet slippers on exercise in BAOR (I imagine that habit has gone down the Swannee since 9/11).

If you were my son, I'd not hesitate to recommend Royal Signals over RMP.
In fact, I'd disown him, if he chose RMP.

P.S.
The R Signals are called 'scalybacks' - NOBODY knows why.
RMP are called 'monkeys' EVERYONE knows why.

Go figure
 
#3
If you want to experience management, then join the RMP. If you want to experience soldiering avoid the Signals. The regimental system is something you will only really find in the infantry.

Scaleybacks (not scalybacks) is due to the scabs caused by the heavy radios, and the crap harnesses that used to come with them.

The term 'monkeys' has been around since the 19th century, and was due to the CMP (Corp of Military Police) headress that organ/piano players used to put on the accompanying monkey.
 
#4
Ardex said:
I am considering joining the RMP as a solider, and was wondering if anyone could give me some USEFUL insight into the actual duties and deployments I should expect. Are there any specific upsides and downsides that I should be aware of? How are they deployed, obligations on operations such as Afghan etc?

I'm somewhat torn between choosing RMP and Signals, and would like as much information as possible before diving in. Recruitment staff can be very unhelpful sometimes, unfortuantely. Usually seem to just direct you to the nearest brochure which answers practically nothing.

Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated.
Best bet and first stop is a local Armed Forces Career Office (AFCO) who will be able to explain about the careers that have vacancies at the moment. They also run assessments to establish what you are capable of joining.

Also :

http://www.armyjobs.mod.uk/Pages/HomePage.aspx

and

http://www.army.mod.uk/

Hope that helps :)
 
#5
25 Year Warrant Oficer, Royal Military Police, answering

Ignorant commisioned officer, did you pass Sandhurst, really!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A little brain power and Google would have given you the answer and you wouldnt have looked like a twat

One of the nicknames for the RMP is the "Monkey Hangers". While the exact origins of the nickname (now shortened to "Monkey") are not known, one possible origin comes from the time of the Napoleonic Wars, when a merchant ship docked at Hartlepool; on board the ship was a small monkey dressed in a sailor's costume. The local people who saw the monkey were convinced that it was a French spy and demanded its demise. The local Provost Marshal hanged the monkey to avoid a riot taking place.

Obviously you didnt have the spunk to have a son then?
 
#6
fdj12 said:
25 Year Warrant Oficer, Royal Military Police, answering

Ignorant commisioned officer, did you pass Sandhurst, really!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A little brain power and Google would have given you the answer and you wouldnt have looked like a twat

One of the nicknames for the RMP is the "Monkey Hangers". While the exact origins of the nickname (now shortened to "Monkey") are not known, one possible origin comes from the time of the Napoleonic Wars, when a merchant ship docked at Hartlepool; on board the ship was a small monkey dressed in a sailor's costume. The local people who saw the monkey were convinced that it was a French spy and demanded its demise. The local Provost Marshal hanged the monkey to avoid a riot taking place.

Obviously you didnt have the spunk to have a son then?
3 sons as a matter of fact.

And thank you for appearing on here to show us all the kind of WO who made the RMP everything I remember about the Corps. :D
 
#8
Since eveyone else has statrted like this, 6 years Infantry and 7 years RMP service replying.....

Anyway, to the original post.

Your main tasking will be Garrison Policing when not on Ops. Which in short is dealing with the day to day Policing jobs of the Garrison. Such as dealing with and investigating Assaults, and Thefts mainly, with the occasional Domestic and Public Order offence thrown in. You will patrol the Garrison area hopefully to prevent the above offences occuring in the first place, but we cannot be everywhere.

You will normally work on a cycle of Policing and Training. Usually a couple of months on each. Training will consist of a mix of general Military training and Police training.

On Ops, you will normally be deployed as at Company level, but be prepared to fill the gaps on other Companies tours. There are a number of different tasks you may get. Which maybe taskings such as, Close Support, where you will provide Police support to the Infantry patrols on the ground. You will Patrol with them and deal with any incidents that occur. You will normally be based with the Infantry in one of the FOBs and you will work from there. You could also end up training the Afgahn National Police in a mentoring role. Again, you will be mainly based with them and patrol with them, along with some infantry support. You could also end up in one of the Main Bases and conduct a Policing role from there, similar in most respects to Garrison Policing. There are many other roles and tasking we end up getting on Ops, so this is just scratching the surface. There is more information on the links previously provided and as always Google is your friend.
 
#9
Cant_Reach_Beer said:
Since eveyone else has statrted like this, 6 years Infantry and 7 years RMP service replying.....

Anyway, to the original post.

Your main tasking will be Garrison Policing when not on Ops. Which in short is dealing with the day to day Policing jobs of the Garrison. Such as dealing with and investigating Assaults, and Thefts mainly, with the occasional Domestic and Public Order offence thrown in. You will patrol the Garrison area hopefully to prevent the above offences occuring in the first place, but we cannot be everywhere.

You will normally work on a cycle of Policing and Training. Usually a couple of months on each. Training will consist of a mix of general Military training and Police training.

On Ops, you will normally be deployed as at Company level, but be prepared to fill the gaps on other Companies tours. There are a number of different tasks you may get. Which maybe taskings such as, Close Support, where you will provide Police support to the Infantry patrols on the ground. You will Patrol with them and deal with any incidents that occur. You will normally be based with the Infantry in one of the FOBs and you will work from there. You could also end up training the Afgahn National Police in a mentoring role. Again, you will be mainly based with them and patrol with them, along with some infantry support. You could also end up in one of the Main Bases and conduct a Policing role from there, similar in most respects to Garrison Policing. There are many other roles and tasking we end up getting on Ops, so this is just scratching the surface. There is more information on the links previously provided and as always Google is your friend.

Thank you for actually answering the question. Always nice to know some people are interested in doing so.

A few further questions though, is there a 'best' RMP company to join for the likes of work, deployments, downtime etc or are they all pretty much equal? And I figure it would be shift-work being a policing role, so what sort of hours can you expect to pull on tour and on garrisson? And how long would you realisitcally get for downtime in the same?
 
#16
Ardex said:
...
I'm somewhat torn between choosing RMP and Signals, and would like as much information as possible before diving in. Recruitment staff can be very unhelpful sometimes, unfortuantely. Usually seem to just direct you to the nearest brochure which answers practically nothing.

Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated.
Ex-scaley speaking. I would recommend the Royal Signals as it gave me a very varied and interesting career. Every posting was different in the role that I fullfilled and the equpment that I worked on. That was as a telecomms tech (radio), now called CSE (communications systems engineer). There are trades in the signals that I would not recommend though, radio operator and powerman being two, although they are probably called something else now.

Another corps that would apeal to me, if I was starting over again would be the Royal Engineers. They always came across as a good bunch of lads, have loads of worthwhile trades and consistently had the best bar in any location. They also seemed to avoid some of the bullsh1t that the signals atracts.

Anyway, good luck with whatever you decide to do.
 
B

BlueDZ

Guest
#17
Quite a bit of time Infantry and now RMP.

If you are interested in joining or transferring to RMP then get down to a local ACIO they should be able to sort out a bit of work experience with them. If you are a VT (Voluntary Transfer) then you will be able to do a 2 week attachment to see if its for you.

Personally I get a great deal of job satisfaction in my chosen career path, its fun but hard work.

:rmp:
 
#18
Any idea on what the waiting times are like/next vanacies for RMP are? Got a friend interested in joining and has recently passed his BARB test with a good enough score to open it up.
 
#19
ilikechips said:
Im sure they are called monkeys because of the monkey in hartlepool that was hanged by military provo's, when they thought it was a french colonial spy.
I thought it was because their knuckles scraped along the ground when they walked
 
#20
When you're 74 and supping a pint in the legion do you want to be known as this:



or this:



If it's a warrior's life you hanker take the latter (Inf); if the former then join the RMP.
 

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