Considering learning Jiu Jitsu

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
Afternoon all,

I’ve recently been giving some thought about joining/attending a local Jiu Jitsu club. This particular club teaches “Gracie Jiu Jitsu”

Obviously I do possess an internet connection & google- nonetheless at this juncture I really haven’t deciphered the difference in Jiu-Jitsu and BJJ.

Any fellow arrsers out there who are involved with Jiu-Jitsu? Any comments and discussion welcome.

Next beginner evening I note states:

Group class 6 Guillotine Defense(GU lesson 32) Straight armlock from mount (GU lesson 9) beginners welcome

I suspect it’s a hit the ground running style of learning?
 

Ritch

LE
Afternoon all,

I’ve recently been giving some thought about joining/attending a local Jiu Jitsu club. This particular club teaches “Gracie Jiu Jitsu”

Obviously I do possess an internet connection & google- nonetheless at this juncture I really haven’t deciphered the difference in Jiu-Jitsu and BJJ.

Any fellow arrsers out there who are involved with Jiu-Jitsu? Any comments and discussion welcome.

Next beginner evening I note states:

Group class 6 Guillotine Defense(GU lesson 32) Straight armlock from mount (GU lesson 9) beginners welcome

I suspect it’s a hit the ground running style of learning?
The main difference between Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Jiu Jitsu is that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu focuses on one element of that. That element improves it 100 fold. So while someone who does BJJ may not know anything in terms of kata, or may not know any weapons work, or any of the classical stuff.

I'd go with the latter if you want a more all-round experience.
 

Fake Sheikh

War Hero
The main difference between Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Japanese Jiu Jitsu is that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu focuses on one element of that. That element improves it 100 fold. So while someone who does BJJ may not know anything in terms of kata, or may not know any weapons work, or any of the classical stuff

I much prefer a baseball bat or if someone is very annoying I let the wife lose on them.
 
Gracie JJ is the most famous school of BJJ.
 
Looking forward to your report on the BJJ tradition of putting a raw beginner with an overpowered opponent to see how they hold up, known as the "raping of the newb".
 
Obviously I do possess an internet connection & google- nonetheless at this juncture I really haven’t deciphered the difference in Jiu-Jitsu and BJJ.

Any fellow arrsers out there who are involved with Jiu-Jitsu? Any comments and discussion welcome.
Not been involved for a long time due to several major injuries but I dabbled in Jiu Jitsu while at university.

Brief summary: Jiu (or Ju) is broadly translated as 'soft' or 'gentle' in this context. Essentially it's the idea of trying to win a fight without needing to repeatedly punch someone (which is Go, the equivalent of 'hard'). Jiu Jitsu usually focusses on throws and locks with a bit of striking and groundwork.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, as the name suggests, was developed in Brazil. A Japanese bloke moved out there, taught the locals the style of Jiu Jitsu he knew and they've developed it since. BJJ focuses almost entirely on grappling and groundwork from the little I have seen.

Essentially standard Jiu Jitsu is not one style but a collection of similar things. It's basically Judo (Ju - do = 'the way of gentleness') with a bit of punching and trying to not get hit by coshes. BJJ is wrestling on the floor.

I make no apologies for the massive simplifications or dodgy Japanese translations above. Also, Kano was taking the piss when he named Judo :)
 
The BJJ especially the Gracie taught stuff does very well in mixed martial art competitions. We have a Gracie school here were the lad went for a while after he got his TKD black belt, he loved it. Once he finishes high school and has some time again he will probably end up going back.

He had done TKD and Tang Soo Do for around 7 years back and forthing between the two as we moved around and he eventually got a black belt from TKD and is a grading away from a black belt in TSD. He was mighty pissed off with kata after 7 years and the very first session at the Gracie school they put him on the mat and let a more experienced practitioner try and use him as a training aid. The more experienced practitioner was a tad surprised, my lad loved it and gave as good as he got. His old TSD teacher used to run an invitation only saturday morning session for adults and the more mature kids on what he used to call street fighting which was his mix of judo and BJJ.

If you want order and a nice progressive approach to getting belts and a black belt in three years go for one of the traditional arts. Hapkido is quite sneaky and see's quite wimpy looking individuals drop very large individuals very quickly. TKD is good for getting a fundamental understanding of the discipline of jap slapping - and you can do it alongside Hapkido as they complement each other.

BJJ is very aggressive and will see you take down club security staff - that is if they are not practitoners, in that case you could be phuqed.

A few of the MMA blokes I have met have done something like karate, or TKD, up to black belt and then moved on to BJJ combining the two.

@Boumer should be able to throw in a comment, or two.
 

Deserter

Old-Salt
Afternoon all,

I’ve recently been giving some thought about joining/attending a local Jiu Jitsu club. This particular club teaches “Gracie Jiu Jitsu”

Obviously I do possess an internet connection & google- nonetheless at this juncture I really haven’t deciphered the difference in Jiu-Jitsu and BJJ.

Any fellow arrsers out there who are involved with Jiu-Jitsu? Any comments and discussion welcome.

Next beginner evening I note states:

Group class 6 Guillotine Defense(GU lesson 32) Straight armlock from mount (GU lesson 9) beginners welcome

I suspect it’s a hit the ground running style of learning?

The main difference between Japanese jj and BJJ isn't all that if you actually go into the detail of both the one big difference is/ was the BJJ side essentially teaches the fighter to fight from his back, which is absolutely nuts in a self defence situation. its also worth noting that Kodakan judo has most of the main techniques of both BJJ and Japanese JJ.

And as for the difference in BJJ and GJJ, the BJJ side is essentially for a competition enviroment, there are a lot of things you can't do such heel hooks, knee bars, single digit attacks and neck cranks etc plus clearly you can't strike, GJJ was always about doing what ever it takes.

There is a definite branch off now however a lot of the shit you see on youtube by the likes of bendy legs Eddie Bravo and Stephen Kesting will get you beaten to death on the street, the main Gracie clan hate what it has become, their objective was always take them down ,mount them and strangle them it was very rare to see them Triangling opponents or doing all the other fancy stuff that people are paying big bucks to learn.

BJJ is now about pretending you can armbar or triangle a drunken cvnt into submission at three in the morning, which you can if you are not wearing trousers or have got ten years to learn.The best vids to watch proper "what works"grappling are the Rio hero's series and of course the gracie challenges of the late 80's, the real stuff will not change.


Oh its also fair to say it ain't Brazillian the Gracies have not be very vocal on its Japanese origins or indeed its English influence in Catch wrestling.

and Krav maga aka Jew Fu that can be summed up in a few words...punch him in the neck.
 
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Deserter

Old-Salt
The BJJ especially the Gracie taught stuff does very well in mixed martial art competitions. We have a Gracie school here were the lad went for a while after he got his TKD black belt, he loved it. Once he finishes high school and has some time again he will probably end up going back.

He had done TKD and Tang Soo Do for around 7 years back and forthing between the two as we moved around and he eventually got a black belt from TKD and is a grading away from a black belt in TSD. He was mighty pissed off with kata after 7 years and the very first session at the Gracie school they put him on the mat and let a more experienced practitioner try and use him as a training aid. The more experienced practitioner was a tad surprised, my lad loved it and gave as good as he got. His old TSD teacher used to run an invitation only saturday morning session for adults and the more mature kids on what he used to call street fighting which was his mix of judo and BJJ.

If you want order and a nice progressive approach to getting belts and a black belt in three years go for one of the traditional arts. Hapkido is quite sneaky and see's quite wimpy looking individuals drop very large individuals very quickly. TKD is good for getting a fundamental understanding of the discipline of jap slapping - and you can do it alongside Hapkido as they complement each other.

BJJ is very aggressive and will see you take down club security staff - that is if they are not practitoners, in that case you could be phuqed.

A few of the MMA blokes I have met have done something like karate, or TKD, up to black belt and then moved on to BJJ combining the two.

@Boumer should be able to throw in a comment, or two.
There is one in Watford its the only certified GJJ school here apparently.

correction, having looked at the site it says one of only a few certified GJJ schools here, bottom line is there is a divide between BJJ and GJJ and to add to the confusion there's even a divide in the GJJ family, the older ones do not always agree with the younger ones,..and the older ones sometimes do not even agree with the other older ones....so what certified means is questionable.
 
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How old are you? I know of three or four mid 30's guys getting back into BJJ and got injured in short order. All were in shape, but two are out for several months. Its hard to temper enthusiasm vs age/good sense...especially when its someones else's enthusiasm!
 
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Deserter

Old-Salt
How old are you? I know of three of four mid 30's guys getting back into BJJ and got injured in short order. All were in shape, but two are out for several months. Its hard to temper enthusiusm vs age/good sense...especially when its someones else's enthusiasm!
Thats why knee bars and heel hooks are banned by the main BJJ federations almost all the injuries come from these, well except neck cranks of course ...these you just end up in Stoke Mandeville.



which is also why so they are so worthwhile to know.
 
My favourite is a BBBJ......
 

Troy

LE
However much you consider it, you can't do Ju Jitsu on line.

Go along and view it and start taking part, it's the only way. Put aside any doubts and have a go.

After many years away from anything like this, it's still a reflex to break-fall whenever I slip, trip or stumble. Just that alone has often saved me injury.

Come back afterwards and tell us how you got on.
 
How old are you? I know of three or four mid 30's guys getting back into BJJ and got injured in short order.
I suppose it depends on how the instructors brief the class and supervise any randori; our Judo club started an adult beginners class, and those of us who have kept it up (mostly over 40, and I'm over 50) have so far avoided much more than the occasional bruise and broken toe. The coaches keep a weather eye on the people who get carried away...

...the two of us (from 12 or so?) who have dropped away through injury were both seriously fit, and were starting to compete; Chris was an ex-professional Saffer scrum-half who kept trying to put all the power in his body into throws, but didn't quite have the technique/self-restraint to transmit all that power through his wrists (kept wrecking them, and he needs them for his work). The other lad is an ex-sapper bodybuilder with a very competitive streak; similarly injured. Basically, remember that speed and power come after correct technique - you can't develop correct technique if you keep hammering it for speed and power...

Granted, I lost a couple of months last year to a broken hand, but that was just to a fluke bump during a warmup exercise. All the major damage is to my ego, when I get chucked around by teenagers with far greater skill (most of them Scotland junior squad; our club coaches really are very, very good). Basically, us oldies are now trusted to work with the teens - we don't squash them, and they don't break us...
 
Thats why knee bars and heel hooks are banned by the main BJJ federations almost all the injuries come from these, well except neck cranks of course ...these you just end up in Stoke Mandeville.



which is also why so they are so worthwhile to know.
I train in Sambo and Backhold, so far I have avoided injury, though about 20 years ago in a Taijutsu class a JJJ guy did a knee bar to counter a hold I had on him, and didn't respond very quickly to my tap, (which should not have happened as we were supposed to be doing 2 man kata) and it took me a long time to recover from that.

If you don't train heel hooks and leglocks you will never learn the counters.
 

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