Considering Laser Eye Surgery - Pro's and Con's?

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The missus had hers done about 15 years back.

Absolute game changer. She went from being 5.5 short sighted in both eyes (basically blind as ****) to 20:20 vision instantly.

A few weeks of having to use eye drops and sleep with a blindfold thing but well worth the hassle.

She got it on finance and the monthly cost was less than what she was spending on contact lenses.

15 years down the line, she now wears glasses again for reading and driving, but nowhere near to the extent of what she used to be like.
 
Had it done nearly 20 years and was the best investment I've ever made.

Previously short-sighted (I'd be squinting at the oncoming bus trying to work out if it was the one I wanted, by the time I could read the number it'd sailed past) then 20/20 vision. No major side effects; some night-time starburst that cleared up in a couple of months, and a sensitivity to bright light that lasted about the same.

The whole procedure was over in about 15-20 minutes and I don't recall any pain or sensations at all during it. Probably more in the mind than anything else.

Nowadays I do need glasses for reading, but that's age related as the lens stiffens and the muscles around it weaken. As previous posters have mentioned it can be addressed but at the expense of my distance vision. TBH I'm happy with slipping on a pair of cheap specs when I need to read the paper, although a previous employer did pay for a decent pair of corrected lenses a few years ago for computer work, but sadly as age progresses so does the prescription. I've gone from a +0.5 to +2.0 over the past 5 years. Every now and then when I'm in a supermarket I'll have a look at their off-the-shelf reading glasses and if they're under a tenner I'll buy a pair. I keep them in the car, bedside cabinet, coat pockets, laptop bag etc, that way I don;t have to think "where's my specs" when I'm going anywhere

So now I've eventually turned into father_mush, we counted 16 pairs of reading glasses around the house after he passed away. I'm only up to 8 at the moment but no doubt I'll get there eventually.
 

Rab_C

LE
The organisation who insure Doctors, surgeons etc (MDU) against malpractice will not insure people to carry out LASIK, read into that what you will.
 
I had cataract surgery which was basically a trade off, went into it with excellent close up vision but distance was like looking into a snow storm, came out with clear distance but required glasses for anything closer than arms reach.
The procedure was done with local anesthetic and when l was supposedly drugged up enough they started only to find l wasn’t, when the surgeon moved in with the laser l automatically grabbed at his arm. After being given more sedative l experienced what it was like to be a hippie on LSD in the 60’s, it was right bizarre as through the eye getting worked on it was like looking through a kaleidoscope with the bright colours and shifting patterns.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I had cataract surgery which was basically a trade off, went into it with excellent close up vision but distance was like looking into a snow storm, came out with clear distance but required glasses for anything closer than arms reach.
The procedure was done with local anesthetic and when l was supposedly drugged up enough they started only to find l wasn’t, when the surgeon moved in with the laser l automatically grabbed at his arm. After being given more sedative l experienced what it was like to be a hippie on LSD in the 60’s, it was right bizarre as through the eye getting worked on it was like looking through a kaleidoscope with the bright colours and shifting patterns.
Could you see Jimi, beckoning to you...?

Glad you stayed away from the light, man.
 
I had the opposite problem. I was long-sighted, so wasn't suitable for laser correction.

Instead, I had to have my natural lenses replaced with inter-occular lens implants (essentially varifocal lenses inside my eyeball). This involved having my natural lenses flushed out with water(?) and then new lenses inserted into the hole. In order to get the flushing...thing in, they have to cut a flap in the retina with a scalpel.

This all happens while you're awake and with your eyelids prised open.

It worked well though, I can now read small print again and get mad halos around street lights at night. It's proper trippy.
 

Diko

Old-Salt
I had lazer surgery to cut small holes or something in my eye in 2015 it’s a bit like getting an electric shock but it doesn’t hurt. Last year I had a cataract removed and new lens fitted took fifteen mins from start to finish didn’t feel a thing despite watching it being done. I’m 75 now and don’t need glasses.
 
Hi, I've managed to get 51 with really good eyesight, only relatively recently having to resort to specs for reading smaller type or things u close but, in the last 6 months I've noticed that there is steady deterioration, I am becoming increasingly more dependent upon my specs and it is clear that it is only going to keep worsening with age.

I dont really like wearing specs, finding it all a bit of a faff to carry around specs to be able to read labels in the shops and at work to read wiring diagrams etc so am currently considering laser eye surgery

I was wondering if anyone else on here has already had laser surgery and had any pro's and con's that would potentially influence my opinion either way?

for example, I'm pretty shit scared about lying on a table with Clockwork Orange style toothpicks keeping my eyes open! and whether it hurts or not and also, how many years does it last eg will me eyes start to get worse again in a few years or would it basically reset my eyes back to when I was a youngster?

Many Thanks

I'd worn glasses from about the age of 11. My eyesight was changing regularly, steadily getting worse. Wanting to play sports like rugby and football was especially difficult as I just couldn't make out what was happening without specs on and neither sport was suitable to play whilst wearing them. Probably the reason why I took up judo.

I had tried contact lenses but just couldn't get on with them. The first type I tried were hard lenses which were awful and I binned the idea for many years. I then tried tried gas-permeable ones, which were better, but still not overly comfortable and they were always a lot of faff.

For a long time I considered laser surgery but was quite scared of the consequences if it went wrong. I really had a great fear of the possibility of losing my sight. As time went by the technology improved and I did a bit of reading up on it. Eye surgery is very common - think of all the cataract operations that are done every year - and is probably one of the safest surgical procedures. Of course there are risks but there are risks with every surgical operation.

Around 2007 I decided to go for it, having LASEK, and am pleased to say that it was one of the best decisions I've made. Okay, it was quite expensive - around £2k at the time - but well worth it. The freedom from wearing glasses after 30 odd years was brilliant and I only wish I'd had the nerve to get it done sooner.

I went to the Optical Express in Birmingham to have my op. I was sat around waiting for quite a long time. When I went into the chair I was really quite nervous. I was given some anaesthetic eye drops which initially stung like buggery but very quickly wore off - within seconds I'd say. The surgeon gave it a few minutes then had a prod on my eye balls which thankfully I couldn't feel. My eyes were clamped open with some metal frame and a flap made in the epithelium. I then stared into the light whilst the laser reshaped my eyeball. The laser switches off very, very quickly if any movement of the eye is detected so no fears there about the laser burning the wrong bit. There was absolutely no pain or sensation, just the smell of burning which was rather disconcerting. The procedure only took a couple of minutes per eye. (I'd been waiting longer in the waiting room for the op than the op took to do.) Almost immediately after leaving the chair there was a noticeable difference in my vision but I was advised to wear dark glasses for a while afterwards because of the sensitivity to light.

Some people have worse after-affects than others and notice different levels of discomfort. My eyes were sensitive to light for a few days and felt a bit gritty but no real pain. I just made sure to follow the post-procedure aftercare instructions. I did have one minor issue and that was during the first week of healing one of my eyes dried out and the epithelium got stuck and tore which was very clucking painful but I went to my local Optical Express the following day and they quickly sorted it. I did suffer from blurred vision for a few weeks as the epithelium healed but this is normal.

@headgear it sounds to me as if you are experiencing the usual development of presbyopia due to the ageing process and is something that also occurs to people who have had laser surgery. If your eyesight has previously been good without the need for corrective lenses then I'm not sure that laser surgery will be of any benefit to you. There is the availability of Refractive lens Exchange but I would suggest doing a lot of research and getting a lot of informed opinion and advice to see if it's suitable.
 
I was all up for having corrective surgery over 20 years ago, two things put me off, one was my old man pointing out that the technology was still very new and who was to know how things would end up 10 or more years down the line.

Well now we know and I regret not going for it now. Although it was a vanity thing for me back then as I hated wearing glasses when hanging out at night, at my age now my chances of scoring with or without glasses is less than nil and even if I did I wouldn't know what to with it, so I can't be arsed getting it done now.

But there was another more substantial reason that held me back later, and that has been alluded to, the night glare. I found that idea was a bit scary, especially driving. Has that been an issue for anyone?
 
I was all up for having corrective surgery over 20 years ago, two things put me off, one was my old man pointing out that the technology was still very new and who was to know how things would end up 10 or more years down the line.

Well now we know and I regret not going for it now. Although it was a vanity thing for me back then as I hated wearing glasses when hanging out at night, at my age now my chances of scoring with or without glasses is less than nil and even if I did I wouldn't know what to with it, so I can't be arsed getting it done now.

But there was another more substantial reason that held me back later, and that has been alluded to, the night glare. I found that idea was a bit scary, especially driving. Has that been an issue for anyone?
The new-ish technology was what held me back and I only got it done when I felt confident it had matured enough.

I suffered with night glare and haloing when I wore glasses and that didn't change after surgery but it's not something I really notice now.
 
Have a read of my experience on here:


I am still happy I had it done. My prescription has gone up a bit over the years mainly due to my astigmatism catching up with me and getting older. I can still see without glasses, but just to be sure I wear them all the time and also have readers. I hat to think how blind I would have been now if I had not been zapped back then. Next time I am back in the UK I am going to visit the people at accuvision again and discuss a touch up.

 
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I was all up for having corrective surgery over 20 years ago, two things put me off, one was my old man pointing out that the technology was still very new and who was to know how things would end up 10 or more years down the line.

Well now we know and I regret not going for it now. Although it was a vanity thing for me back then as I hated wearing glasses when hanging out at night, at my age now my chances of scoring with or without glasses is less than nil and even if I did I wouldn't know what to with it, so I can't be arsed getting it done now.

But there was another more substantial reason that held me back later, and that has been alluded to, the night glare. I found that idea was a bit scary, especially driving. Has that been an issue for anyone?

I had read about it before hand and was a tad worried about it, the bloke who checked me out for the surgery even mentioned it.

As it turns out surgery did not affect me in that way, so I was fortunate in that respect. I put it down to having the wavefront surgery which identifies, pinpoints exactly, the areas that need zapping with the laser rather than the older method of totally re-contouring the eyeball that creates loads of tiny circles around the iris - and hence a halo effect.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I was all up for having corrective surgery over 20 years ago, two things put me off, one was my old man pointing out that the technology was still very new and who was to know how things would end up 10 or more years down the line.

Well now we know and I regret not going for it now. Although it was a vanity thing for me back then as I hated wearing glasses when hanging out at night, at my age now my chances of scoring with or without glasses is less than nil and even if I did I wouldn't know what to with it, so I can't be arsed getting it done now.

But there was another more substantial reason that held me back later, and that has been alluded to, the night glare. I found that idea was a bit scary, especially driving. Has that been an issue for anyone?

The missus suffered a bit from night glare. She described it as bright lights looking like twinkling stars.

So things like street lamps and car headlights give off a star effect.

To be honest her driving at any time of day / night has always been terrifying and the addition of this doesn’t seem to have made it any worse or better.
 
Have a read of my experience on here:


I am still happy I had it done. My prescription has gone up a bit over the years mainly due to my astigmatism catching up with me and getting older. I can still see without glasses, but just to be sure I wear them all the time and also have readers. I hat to think how blind I would have been now if I had not been zapped back then. Next time I am back in the UK I am going to visit the people at accuvision again and discuss a touch up.


thank you - some cracking info there - like the diving goggles in the shower :)
 

964ST

LE
I would consider getting my eyes reworked if I was stll working on cars. It was really frustrating working in confined spaces with glasses that I required to see fine detail.
Now I have jacked that shit in, and I can cope with the mild embuggerance of having a pair of specs burning holes in my head when they are parked on my bonce waiting to be lowered.
 
I would consider getting my eyes reworked if I was stll working on cars. It was really frustrating working in confined spaces with glasses that I required to see fine detail.
Now I have jacked that shit in, and I can cope with the mild embuggerance of having a pair of specs burning holes in my head when they are parked on my bonce waiting to be lowered.

Get some of those magnetic ones for when you are working on things. Glasses I mean.

iu


@mazon would likely be your friend for those.
 

TamH70

MIA
Get some of those magnetic ones for when you are working on things. Glasses I mean.

iu


@mazon would likely be your friend for those.

Those are the kind of glasses that the morgue doctor wears in one of those CSI shows. They look kinda geeky cool.
 

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