Conger Eel

#1
A few of the lads from work went on a sea-fishing trip today, with a view to bringing back loads of free meat for a BBQ this weekend. I wasn't sure what to expect, so I prepared a bit of room in the freezer and hoped for the best. They arrived back tonight with a conger eel about a metre long and a few bream.

Now the bream I don't have a problem with - it's easy enough to prepare a marinade on the day, and they don't require too much cooking. The eel, on the other hand, I'm stuck with, as it's quite tough meat. I've made fish pie, casseroles, etc with eel before, which it is quite well suited to, but was wondering if anyone had any decent recipes/ideas for cooking it on a BBQ?

:nemo: :fish: :nemo: :fish: :nemo: :fish: :nemo: :fish:
 
#2
Bream. Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't caught one yet this year but had loads last year. Lime is a really good ingredient for your marinade.
If you cook them whole, use a pan that slopes up at the edges and lay the tails up the slope. That way the thinner flesh near the tail doesn't overcook.


Conger................ Oh dear.

A lot of ball-ache to make edible, most of which consists of trying to disguise its flavour and texture.
After you have fucked about with it for ages, nobody will eat it, it will end up in the bin. Do the sensible thing and just bin it now to save yourself all that effort.

Enjoy the bream
 

mysteron

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Sorry mate - smoking eel is your best bet..... But you simply won't have time at a BBQ. Bin it, as stated above it is more hassle than it is worth and it is an acquired taste at best.

As many here know, I likes me fodder but eel is something that is not to my pallette.

Have fun!!!
 
#5
Conger eel was once cooked by my Mrs. She only tried once. You can forget the taste of shit, but you don't forget the taste of conger eel.
 

mysteron

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
OK - so this was bothering me as I knew I had a recipe for this somewhere. So over breakfast, i went and looked in my cook's library..... I knew it...... Fecking Gor-fecking-don Fecking Ram-feck-Say.

Here is how a 3 Michelin Star Chef does it. If you eat and Conger still tastes awful, then you know, like me, that eel isn't for eating.

Ingredients:

* 2 kg conger Eels head and skin off, cut into boneless fillets
* 1 tablespoon Olive Oil
* Sea Salt & freshly ground black pepper
* Saffron
* 1 bulb Fennel trimmed and finely sliced
* 1 carrot chopped
* 2 sticks Celery sliced
* 1 shallot finely chopped
* 2 Cloves Garlic crushed
* 2 star anise
* 2 teaspoons Cayenne pepper
* 250 ml white wine plus extra
* 2 L fish stock
* 2 Potatoes peeled and finely diced already blanched
* 3 beef Tomatoes deseeded and chopped
* 1 tablespoon Basil chopped
* 1 tablespoon Flat-leaf parsley chopped

Method

1. Take the conger eel fillets and season with olive oil, black pepper and saffron. Place in a frying pan over a moderate heat adding more olive oil to the pan and fry the conger eel in a little olive oil for 2 -3 minutes on each side.
2. In another pan heat some olive oil and add the fennel, carrots, celery, shallots, garlic, star anise and cayenne pepper. Cook stirring over a medium heat for a few minutes. Next pour in the white wine and leave to reduce.
3. Remove the fish from the frying pan and add to the soup. Deglaze the conger eel pan with a little extra Pernod to catch all the cooking flavours and pour this into the soup as well.
4. Now add the fish stock, potatoes, fresh tomato, basil and parsley and cook out for 20 minutes. Finally transferring in batches into a blender blitz until smooth and strain back into the pan through a sieve to get rid of any unwanted bones.
5. Simmer for approximately 8 minutes and check for seasoning. Remove from the poaching liquid and divide amongst the four soup bowls. Serve immediately.
 
#7
Conger steaks cooked in foil after being marianaded in the magic ingreadeant Perond, a very large glass
 
#9
cloudbuster said:
tropper66 said:
Conger steaks cooked in foil after being marianaded in the magic ingreadeant Perond, a very large glass
Every one an absolute gem.
Yaes, but thats a lettuce

Also try Conger cooked with apples, onoins and cider, served on a bed of Saffron rice, EEEMMMMMMMHHH
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#10
tropper66 said:
cloudbuster said:
tropper66 said:
Conger steaks cooked in foil after being marianaded in the magic ingreadeant Perond, a very large glass
Every one an absolute gem.
Yaes, but thats a lettuce

Also try Conger cooked with apples, onoins and cider, served on a bed of Saffron rice, EEEMMMMMMMHHH
Mate, you need to ease up on the marinade. Or marianade, it's your call.
 
#11
I thought I'd report back on the conger - it was quite nice actually, and nowhere near as tough as everyone said it would be. Here's how I did it;

4kg eel, cut into 1.5 inch thick steaks
2 lemons
2 limes
4 garlic cloves
6 dried chilli pods
handful of basil leaves
150ml sunflower oil
50ml white wine vinegar
Salt and pepper

Put the chilli, garlic, basil, oil, vinegar, salt and pepper into a blender. Add the juice of the limes and lemons. Blend it down to a vinaigrette. Chop the remaining lemons and limes into 1/8th pieces and throw together with the eel into the marinading bowl. Pour the marinade in, making sure to thoroughly coat every steak. Leave for 2-3 hours. Cook on a moderate BBQ for approx 15 mins each side (they are very robust and stand up to the heat very well.)

Everyone had it and thoroughly enjoyed it - the bones were nowhere near as problematic as we'd envisaged, and the meat was tender and flaky. The only downside I could find is that the strong fish smell hangs on the breath long after eating it, so probably not best eaten before going out on the lash. If the lads catch this on the next trip I'll definitely cook it again.
 
#12
skintboymike said:
I thought I'd report back on the conger - it was quite nice actually, and nowhere near as tough as everyone said it would be. Here's how I did it;

4kg eel, cut into 1.5 inch thick steaks
2 lemons
2 limes
4 garlic cloves
6 dried chilli pods
handful of basil leaves
150ml sunflower oil
50ml white wine vinegar
Salt and pepper

Put the chilli, garlic, basil, oil, vinegar, salt and pepper into a blender. Add the juice of the limes and lemons. Blend it down to a vinaigrette. Chop the remaining lemons and limes into 1/8th pieces and throw together with the eel into the marinading bowl. Pour the marinade in, making sure to thoroughly coat every steak. Leave for 2-3 hours. Cook on a moderate BBQ for approx 15 mins each side (they are very robust and stand up to the heat very well.)

Everyone had it and thoroughly enjoyed it - the bones were nowhere near as problematic as we'd envisaged, and the meat was tender and flaky. The only downside I could find is that the strong fish smell hangs on the breath long after eating it, so probably not best eaten before going out on the lash. If the lads catch this on the next trip I'll definitely cook it again.
Im F**king starving after reading that, roll on my pub lunch, a sprig of Parsley gets rid of the smell

Try and get a copy of "Simply Fish" by Jenny Baker, its a crappy paperback, but the fish cooks bible, I keep it in my fishing box as it has scores of raw fish and marinaded recipies in an A to Z format,
 
#14
skintboymike said:
tropper66 said:
a sprig of Parsley gets rid of the smell
I tried washing it away with rum and grappa, didn't work though. 8O
I should think that by then you didnt give a F**k anyway
 

terroratthepicnic

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#16
Cut the eel into about 1 inch cubes.

Soak in vinager for 24hrs drain the soak in lemon juice for 24hrs.

Make up a beer batter, cover the eel cubes in batter, then deep fry.

Serve with whatever takes your fancy.
 
#17
terroratthepicnic said:
Cut the eel into about 1 inch cubes.

Soak in vinager for 24hrs drain the soak in lemon juice for 24hrs.

Make up a beer batter, cover the eel cubes in batter, then deep fry.

Serve with whatever takes your fancy.
Soak one batch in the hottest chilli sauce you can find before the batter and fry, it adds some excitment to the meal
 
#18
Tropper can you do an essay plan for me

Discuss Wolf Dombrowsky's view that, "the term 'disaster' has only ephemeral significance. It is a trigger, a flag to signal a meaning, a stimulus to produce a specific reaction."

many thanks
 
#19
thegimp said:
Tropper can you do an essay plan for me

Discuss Wolf Dombrowsky's view that, "the term 'disaster' has only ephemeral significance. It is a trigger, a flag to signal a meaning, a stimulus to produce a specific reaction."

many thanks
EH, now the only good thing about him was that he knew where the BKYC was

Ps. my mate Jan ,who is the disaster manager for the Government of Belize thinks he's the dogs, so ask him

pps what the f**k has that got to do with cooking Conger
 
#20
thegimp said:
tropper66 said:
thegimp said:
Tropper can you do an essay plan for me

Discuss Wolf Dombrowsky's view that, "the term 'disaster' has only ephemeral significance. It is a trigger, a flag to signal a meaning, a stimulus to produce a specific reaction."

many thanks
EH, now the only good thing about him was that he knew where the BKYC was

Ps. my mate Jan ,who is the disaster manager for the Government of Belize thinks he's the dogs, so ask him

pps what the f**k has that got to do with cooking Conger
well you seem to be a fecking expert on everything else :D :lol:
Well I did read a bit about what he wrote about the Welsh floods in Colwyn bay but thought he spent to much time discussing the "levell" of a disaster rather than coming up with method to improve the reaction

Hope that helps
 

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads