Confessions of a p*ss artist

Gentlemen,
I have now been off the grog for 24 days. It’s not much I grant you, but it has given me a few insights that I thought worth sharing with you degenerates. I’m not advocating a course of action but I suspect that my experiences may resonate with some of you and to be blunt, I don’t give a monkeys if a few internet warriors decide to gob off.

I spent last night with my boozing buddies from the local (drinking water and ginger beer)and found that even after twenty four days my perspective has changed and thought some of you might find my Insights interesting.

I have got to stress that I have got no medical expertise whatsoever so please don’t act upon anything that I ramble on about in here without getting medical advice first because going off the grog can be bloody dangerous.
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-1/61-66.pdf

The story in a nutshell, first wife buggered off about ten years ago, this broke my heart and I was just back from a project as a civilian in Aceh. That was a really nasty war and, in hindsight, I should have f*cked the job off from the start but I didn’t and it stuffed my marriage up. Back in Aussie, got a job in an industry where everyone was fifteen years younger than me and adopted a work hard, play hard lifestyle. It was just what I needed at the time but the grog consumption crept up. Then had a mid-life crisis and joined a French NGO in Afghan. This was a culture shock as a lot of NGO workers were very strange and the soldier’s borderline judgment between bravery and stupidity was very different for them than it is for us. Trust me, there is nothing more terrifying that working with a group of peope who are very smart, naïve, idealistic and brave in a war zone.

After a few months sh*tting myself, I concluded that I liked development work but hated NGO types and joined a much safer Government organisation and spent a few years travelling the world on short postings and was based in Canberra.

Home after the first tour in Afghan, I found it quite hard to relate to family and friends and it was different from an Army tour as there you have rituals like welcome home parades and mates to compare notes, share stories and take the p*ss out of.

With aid work, you fly back and resume your life as if nothing has happened. However, I felt rather disconnected from middle class Australia and found the people boring, superficial and self- satisfied. My grog consumption rose again as it felt that I could establish a genuine connection with these people when p*ssed but in reality they were probably writing me off as a drunk d*ckhead.

I also went through a string of relationships, some were great and some were with the bitches from hell. I found out that my girlfriend at the time was pregnant via a phone call as I was boarding a ‘plane at Maputo airport.

After my little lad was born, I couldn’t bring myself to p*ss off to war zones and was able to transition to Australia based management and consulting jobs as I’ve got good qualifications and a fairly impressive resume. I then ended up in Darwin, which is the grog capital of the universe and found myself drinking even more. Split up from son’s mum and ended up in Brisbane through another failed relationship.

For the last couple of years I have been worried about my drinking and made a few half arsed attempts to curb it and reassure myself that everything was ok and I wasn’t heading for a meth drinking future on a park bench. I even posted on Arrse about it.

However, over the last few months I have been single and spent even more time in the pub than normal. I got fed up with waking up with hangovers, got fed up with bollocking myself through guilt at drinking so much and got fed up with the nagging worry that I might still be over the limit driving to work in the morning. I started feeling a few pains in the gut and googled “liver and alcohol” and found you can effectively get rid of a fatty liver after two weeks off the grog. I thought to myself, “two weeks is nothing, and if I can’t get through that, then I’ve really got a problem” so I did the two weeks.
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Liver_disease_(alcoholic)/Pages/Treatmentpg.aspx
What I wasn’t expecting was the extent that your brain regenerates after two weeks off the p*ss so after two weeks, I sat down with a cup of tea and a note pad to decide what to do.
http://www.searidgealcoholrehab.com/article-brain-recovery-2-weeks-sobriety.php
I found the clarity of my thinking amazing so I decided to do another two weeks (minimum). It’s these thoughts that I have decided to share with you.
TBC
 
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Very informative and thanks for sharing. Similar story here in a few ways. Do you believe you can maintain it?
 
Ok so what are the dramatic insights that I alluded to in my previous posts?

Nothing is particularly earth shattering except for the fact that I have thought them out myself in much the same way that you work out a math’s or logistics solution to a problem and therefore have confidence in your reasoning, but here goes:

The main theme is that:

Booze strips you of ability to see the bloody obvious.
I think the examples below will illustrate this point. But in my view, people drink because getting pissed feels good, it’s a great way to relax and a bloody good buzz. I can’t subscribe to the disease view of alcohol dependence as I think that we are all masters of our own fate, are accountable for our choices and nobody holds a gun to our heads and forces a pint of Guinness down our throats. I think that the major downside of grog is that it creates a number of “blind spots” that become evident after a couple of weeks off it. The following are the most profound from my perspective.

You behave like a t*t when you drink (but you don’t see it or “forget” it)
It’s a funny thing but when you are on the turps you develop amnesia about the bloody embarrassing and stupid things you do when you’re pissed. I have spent the last few weeks cringing in embarrassment at recollections of the daft things that I’ve done on the grog. To get it into context, I’ve never got into punch ups, been arrested, been done for drink driving and never missed a day’s work through grog. However, I can remember stuff like dashing across a restaurant spewing up, talking absolute shite to people and picking arguments (only verbal) with people I should, with hindsight, have tried to get onside.

Your memory of inebriated conversations also goes a bit strange as well. To give an example. I went out last night to local pub and drank water and ginger ale. Friend said “you should go and have a chat with X, he’s in the army and you’d get on with him, he’s an MP” “Jolly Good” says I “ex Infantry and monkeys don’t normally get on but I’ll give him the benefit”. Went over for a chat and he looked like the stereotypical trench dodging, bullying, fat, grey and bald monkey passed over major twerp. Anyway, old mate reckoned (whilst surrounded by four largish mates) that I’d called him a c*nt in a previous conversation. I honestly don’t recall ever speaking to him. He looked like a bit of a knob and reckon he might have had a bit of a hissy fit over a joke I’d made as calling someone that really isn’t part of my vocabulary these days. However, it does beg the question, how many other people have I made an enemy of whilst pissed?

You draw a lot of resentment from alcoholic's kids and ex wives, (particularly in the "do gooder" community).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_(psychology)
Have a look at “displacement theory in psychology” as it’s quite interesting.


I remember a hot Sunday Afternoon in an African Country getting hammered with a crew from the British Embassy and the Pom v Aussie p*ss taking banter started. Being a Pom working for the Aussies, I decided to be fair and take the p*ss out of both countries.

All harmless good fun, or so I thought, however, a lady on my team went from being a good mate to completely belligerent and explosive. Transpired daddy was a pommy alcoholic and I had become a surrogate neglectful father figure in her mind and she put it about to all and sundry at work, that I had been bad mouthing ‘Stralia whilst p*ssed.

Another example, girlfriend moved to Darwin and a mutual acquaintance took her to one side and assassinated my character saying that I was like “Sir Les Patterson” and asking my girlfriend what the hell she was doing with me. I wouldn’t have minded but the mutual acquaintance’s husband is currently a guest of HM for a very long time for a very nasty crime committed under the influence.

The excuse that “you’re shy and need grog as a social lubricant” is b*llshit (or orange juice improves your karaoke).
I used to kid myself that beneath the big, tough, gruff persona, I was really a poor shy sensitive soul who needed grog to overcome my shyness. To be honest; its bollix, I’ve argued with war lords, given speeches and lectures to hundreds of people and, on the odd occasion that I’ve had to stay off the grog at a social function because I’ve either been on my best behavior or been driving I didn’t turn into a nervous wreck or a green man from bloody mars. I got some good advice from an old hand military attaché years ago, that he drank like a fish with his mates but never at official functions, his reasoning was:

“if you put your foot in your mouth and you’re drinking orange juice, you’ve put your foot in your mouth, if you put your foot in your mouth and you’re drinking gin and tonics, you’re a disgrace to your country and the service”.

My approach has been to avoid the pub for the first two weeks off as the benefits of quitting were yet to become apparent and I suspect that my resolve was a tad fragile, but for the second two weeks, I realised I couldn’t turn into a hermit, so I’ve been deliberately been putting myself into situations, in a controlled way, that would normally provoke a bit of anxiety and which one would normally anaesthetize for, beforehand. As an example, I’ve found that orange juice really improves your singing voice and that I can do a passable Leonard Cohen pub Karaoke impersonation that even draws the odd cheer.

You do get the odd wassock who tries to ply you with grog, but I think that it’s a good test of who your mates are , as my real mates have been supportive when I’ve said I’m off the grog as a bit of a health kick and the drop kicks who try to get you back on it are probably best out of your life anyway.

Grog is bloody expensive

Because of the fiction that I’m “shy”, I’ve never really felt the need to drink at home alone. Therefore, I didn’t follow the recommended standard advice of pouring all my single malt whiskey down the sink. Most of my drinking is at the pub with mates. I only really use cash at the pub and for really small expenses like newspapers, coffee and car parking. Most of my other spending is on the card.

I’ve had a look at my bank statements for ATM transactions for the last few months and the amount staggered me! I kidded myself that I was only spending money that I could afford down the pub but the amount of money I was really spending was obscene. I could have serviced a lease on a new Range Rover, paid the mortgage on an investment property or put a lot of dough away for Bushmills Jn’rs education. I’m bloody ashamed that I fell for that one.

My estimates were confirmed by the fact that for some reason, I still drink water and ginger ale at the same rate I used to drink pints but the difference is I keep tabs of how many ginger ales and water I'm drinking and ginger ale costs $5 a pint and a pint of water is free.


Grog really isn’t good for your health.

Stands to reason, the liver is the waste disposal plant of the body, if it’s spending half its time processing alcohol it’s not doing what it was designed to do. Therefore, your heath is going to suffer. I know there is research that says moderate drinking is good for you but I think that the research probably says more about the risk tolerance of people who have the capacity to drink moderately than anything else. A glass of wine, for the standards put out by the health Nazi’s, is about the same quantity as a swig of communion wine.

Since quitting, my skin looks a lot better, I’m getting a lot more attention from women and I’m paying a lot more attention to grooming and am eating better food more regularly. I’m also sleeping a lot better. Speaking of women……….

How the hell can you attract an intelligent, good looking and emotionally balanced woman when you get p*ssed on first dates?

Having done a bit of a post mortem of past relationships I seem to have dated half the nurses and social workers in Australia. I always thought that the reason for this was more demographics based as I tend to go for educated smart women and they tend to gravitate to these professions. However, I am now of the view that any woman who will put up with a pissed bloke on dates has either very low self-confidence, a deep seated need to “fix” people, or is a p*ss head herself. Hence, my penchant for the caring professions or professional people fixers.

My sense of self- preservation has always led me to give the p*ss heads a swerve. I have three close female friends who are all very attractive and accomplished but have never taken things, other than the odd drunken grope, to a romantic level for that very reason.

http://healthpsychology.org/do-you-always-want-to-help/
I’ve been reading a bit about this co-dependency stuff and suspect that there is a lot of sense to it and it’s difficult to see how any relationship based upon shaky foundations can result in happiness. Therefore, the bottom line, is that boozing and wise choices when selecting women don’t mix.

I’m also wondering if it is possible to redefine existing relationships to make them work and establish proper boundaries or if they need to go into the “too hard basket”. Essentially, I’m trying to work out that if I continue relationships with women who “need to be needed” am I setting myself up for a lifetime of lurching from manufactured crisis to crisis?

Haven’t reached any firm conclusions yet but it’s opened up a whole new way of looking at the world.

Hope people are finding this interesting. I have formed a bit of a theory over why former soldiers and workers in hazardous professions seem to hit the bottle hard but I’ll save that for the next gripping installment.
 
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Very informative and thanks for sharing. Similar story here in a few ways. Do you believe you can maintain it?
Thanks mate, that discussion is for installment four, "the way ahead"; however, I'm currently in the mode of being bloody glad that I spotted the blind spots when I did, in the same way that you feel when you spot and avert a f*ck up waiting to happen at work.

Writing al this stuff down is helping me to clarify my thoughts and I've committed (to myself) to stay off the turps 'til Sunday. I'm thinking that I will probably commit to another two weeks off to knock off caffeine and then try to get rid of the cigs. My theory is that if you take out the easiest addictions first, the harder ones become easier to manage.

By way of information, I found giving up the grog really easy compared to my last attempt to give up the smokes as the only time I really got cravings was on a few evenings at 5.00pm driving home from work (particularly on a Friday) and they were really minor and similar to how I used to miss cheese(my favourite food) when I was making weight as a boxer as a kid.

However, I never drank every day, and only in the evening or Sunday afternoons, and was probably more of a binge drinker than a full blown alcoholic. That's why I felt confident to go cold turkey without medical advice. However, if anybody's reading this and decides to quit, please get medical advice. I don't want to inadvertently cause harm to anyone especially another Arrser.

Longer term, I'm not sure of the best approach. I know I don't want to spend the rest of my life as a p*ss head and the thought of my little lad growing up with a drunk for a father is abhorrent. I see that there is a lot of research that indicates that a significant number of heavy drinkers can resume moderate drinking but that sounds to me like playing with fire and the thought of two pints of beer and no more, being pleasurable sounds a bit weird.

Long term, what I think I'll probably do is commit to a year or so off it and then review the situation. However, that decision's for another day
 
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Different situation mate but in '86 I left the army and could not afford to continue at BAOR rates.
2 years later I started buying my flat, a £34k mortguage on £7k a year.
I then lost my job and was temping till '92.
Drink or going out was not possible.
That 4 years undoubtably helped my liver.
I now have a couple of pints and whisky's at home or more on rallies (got one this w/e) but have absolutely no desire to get shit faced ever again.
And with lack of practice probobly don't have the ability.
So good luck and think about it in a year or so's time.
 
Ok, approaching the home straight, the Bushmills theory of why a lot of squaddies turn into a p*ss heads.

I think most of you will probably see that I like to think of myself as a fairly rational and analytical sort of chap and I googled a few pages about "how to give up piss" and was quite unimpressed with some of the results. I was very disappointed that one leading organization suggested that you should effectively pray to the tooth fairy to stay off the turps, spend the rest of your life going to meetings and give up your personal power to an unqualified collective of people with nothing better to do than hang around with a crew of fellow ex drunks.There were a lot of obvious logical flaws put forward by this mob that you can find pretty easily on the internet. If this mob works for you, great, but it's not my cup of tea!

I am not anti- religion by any means and when sh*t scared, I have said "Our Fathers" to myself with the best of them. However, I've got a perfectly good religion thanks and don't want another one. I was just looking for expertise on how to tackle the problem of drinking more than was good for me.

The one theory that I did relate to is this CORE methodology .It's explained very concisely here.
http://www.wikihow.com/Quit-Drinking-without-Alcoholics-Anonymous

"One useful way to look at a drinking problem is to view it in terms of survival instincts. As scientists have known for many years, the brain is divided into two basic parts, which we will call the human brain (you) and the animal brain (it).

Technically, the "human brain" is called the "neocortex," and the animal brain is called the "midbrain." The neocortex is a complex, conscious section of the brain. It is the part of the brain that gives you a sense of individuality - a sense of "being you." The midbrain is an unconscious section of the brain that regulates all of your survival functions, such as breathing, eating, sex, etc.
When you become dependent on alcohol, booze becomes one of the midbrain's survival drives. This happens because the animal part of the brain decides what substances are good for us based on how they make us feel. When we drink, it makes us feel very good, at least for a little while.

The conscious part of our brain knows that drinking has many negative consequences, but the animal brain does not understand this.
It thinks this way: "Alcohol = good feelings = survival." In other words, it is convinced that you need alcohol to survive. This is why it can be so hard to to quit drinking once you are addicted. The animal part of you brain thinks it will die without alcohol. Because of this, you could call it the "booze brain."

The booze brain doesn't care about what alcohol will do to your life. It doesn't care if you lose your job, your home, your family, your health, or your mind. It doesn't have the ability to even consider any of that. Its whole function is to convince you to do things for your immediate survival, and because alcohol makes you feel good when you drink it, it thinks you need alcohol to stay alive. Because it is a primitive part of the brain, that's all it knows or cares about.

If you don't understand how the booze brain works, it can easily trick the human brain (you) into drinking. That's why so many people who have a drinking problem often wonder why they keep doing it even though they know better. However, once you understand why you drink, you are prepared to take action with the CORE process"

Why did I find this particularly interesting? Well my theory is that, for those of us who have spent protracted periods in war zones, we have learnt to listen more closely to our "survival instincts" and "trust our gut" about situations more than civvies.

Therefore, if the Emperor Mong is telling us to go and have another pint in the same voice that it told us to p*ss off quick from a bazzar in Masser and we hear a sickening bang behind us three minutes later, we are probably more inclined to listen to it, than a bank clerk from Milton Keynes.

Dunno' if this theory is right, and I have zero medical expertise, but it sounds more plausible to me than praying to the tooth fairy to replace my desire for a nice glass of Chablis with an insatiable desire for Tetley tea. Will get onto my ideas about the way ahead in a day or two.
 
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D

Deleted 4886

Guest
Going back to my time if you didn't join in the drinking culture it could affect your career. 'He doesn't 'socialise' therefore he's not a well-rounded chap'. As a result a lot of people of my military generation (82-04) drank far too much. I could go out every day here and start drinking early- it takes discipline not to as I am probably aware that I have a problem with booze due to the past.

I tend to drink 2 days a week now but the urge is always there- the thing is its a crutch that in the end isn't. Sometimes I will have a binge, other times I make a conscious efffort not to drink. i now also tend to go ten to 20 days without booze 3-4 times a year to give my liver a rest. i always feel crap for the first few days and sleep badly as well- they key is not to say 'well i'll just have a quick beer to help me sleep.

As i said to start with, its the culture of our past that finds us here- at least we are now aware and try to compensate for it. I plan to die shagging, not from liver failure.

Somebody said to me recently ' the thing is with you is that one beer is too many and ten is not enough'. He is right and I know it.
 
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the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
Going back to my time if you didn't join in the drinking culture it could affect your career. 'He doesn't 'socialise' therefore he's not a well-rounded chap'. As a result a lot of people of my military generation (82-04) drank far too much. I could go out every day here and start drinking early- it takes discipline not to as I am probably aware that I have a problem with booze due to the past.

I tend to drink 2 days a week now but the urge is always there- the thing is its a crutch that in the end isn't. Sometimes I will have a binge, other times I make a conscious efffort not to drink. i now also tend to go ten to 20 days without booze 3-4 times a year to give my liver a rest. i always feel crap for the first few days and sleep badly as well- they key is not to say 'well i'll just have a quick beer to help me sleep.

As i said to start with, its the culture of our past that finds us here- at least we are now aware and try to compensate for it. I plan to die shagging, not from liver failure.

I pointed this out on the other thread
I was in 87 - 96 and everyone from top to bottom was on the lash.
You were considered a bit of a poof if you didn't join in.
I can go ages without a drink it doesn't bother me
But I find I get caught out by the unplaned ones just a quick pint turns into an all dayer
The hangovers hurt more now though.
 
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Yeah,doctrine for Cpl's Mess do's in '60's,'You will be there,you will socialise'.
 
Great thread.
I come from a long line of heavy drinkers. It's not just in the military, miners, IT, city workers, teachers...
Personally, I find it hard to stop drinking when I start and it was the boozy black outs that scared the shit out of me.

For me having kids was the best excuse for not drinking, you tend not to be called a poof/big girls blouse when you order an OJ and stay sober.

When I was in London I would have a couple of pints after work (waiting for rush hour to pass) then hammer it on Friday night and Saturday..... now, I have on average 2 pints a week and have a healthy bank account.

Keep up the good work!
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
Really interesting thread with some good points. I've always enjoyed a "few" pints and have neve really thought much about the effects, both socially and on my health, but over the last year or two have cut right back on how much I partake of the ale, well at least to how much I could put away. I now only drink on one or two of my days off. I can take it or leave it, to be honest, especially when there's none in the house, but if it's there, I will probably have a binge then leave it for a week. And the hangovers are definitely harder to deal with than when I was in where you would get up after a night on the lash and run it off on a 5 or 6 miler on troop PT.
 
Good thread.

I honestly thought the Army had turned me into an alcoholic. Before I went to Germany, I'd go out 2 maybe 3 mights a week. The Germany routine was "get home, open a beer", go back to camp or town on the piss as often as possible, with or without wife.

Having left, a job took me to Riyadh for a month. I wondered how I would survive without a beer. Well, I did, and it didn't bother me at all. Granted I got Harry von Turbo Shiters (to borrow a Ravers-ism) on the plane home, but it just didn't bother me for the 4 weeks I was there.

It's been like that ever since. I can go days or weeks without a beer, and alway enjoy it when I do have anything from one to many. I can drink a case of beer (just about!), but can't do spirits at all. My tilt lamp comes on after 3 or 4.

Kirner Pils, by the way. Small town in the Eiffel with a brewery. If you can get that, it's nectar. Far and away the best beer I've ever had. And I've had a few!
 
I got into a rut, looking after my Weegie father in law, always liked whisky, but sensibly kept away.

After a while, I found I couldn't sleep without it, what a bitch, troubled sleep, nightmares, etc.

There was another thread on here, then, when the Blessed Jarrod, mentioned that a slow gentle course of Temazepam or similar, worked best, in his experience, over a number of weeks.

Fuggit, I thought, having an old bottle of TM, with a few Nightols as back- up.

Been clean now since New Years Eve.

It doesn't actually hurt as much as I thought...... Good Luck, to all in the same position.
 

ACAB

LE
Strangely, I drink every day. I think medically, I'm classed as a 'Habitual Drinker' yet when working abroad, apart from lack of sleep the first night, the lack of booze didn't bother me at all.
 
Keep up the good work, stay sober one day at a time. Many, many moons ago I ended up as a Regimental Piss Heid, and screwed up an Army career by loosing my tapes after turning up on duty incapable. I was a piss head for many years in and out of the military.

Today I am a sober boring old fart, and have been sober for 25 years. I use a 12 Step Program to stay sober, one day at a time.
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
Good thread.

I honestly thought the Army had turned me into an alcoholic. Before I went to Germany, I'd go out 2 maybe 3 mights a week. The Germany routine was "get home, open a beer", go back to camp or town on the piss as often as possible, with or without wife.

Having left, a job took me to Riyadh for a month. I wondered how I would survive without a beer. Well, I did, and it didn't bother me at all. Granted I got Harry von Turbo Shiters (to borrow a Ravers-ism) on the plane home, but it just didn't bother me for the 4 weeks I was there.

It's been like that ever since. I can go days or weeks without a beer, and alway enjoy it when I do have anything from one to many. I can drink a case of beer (just about!), but can't do spirits at all. My tilt lamp comes on after 3 or 4.

Kirner Pils, by the way. Small town in the Eiffel with a brewery. If you can get that, it's nectar. Far and away the best beer I've ever had. And I've had a few!

Think most of us are the same - I can 'not drink' but I'll be fcuked if I can drink sensibly. Oddly, I don't drink much here in Ireland. The culture doesn't lend itself to my style of drinking.

But eventually, I'll throw a track and get lashed with a capital L. Takes about 3 days to get it out of my system, then I'll do maybes 3 weeks dry.
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
Strangely, I drink every day. I think medically, I'm classed as a 'Habitual Drinker' yet when working abroad, apart from lack of sleep the first night, the lack of booze didn't bother me at all.

I drank every day in Lancashire, but the culture was such that the pub was the centre of the community, so you'd see your friends every time you went out. It's not quite like that here, so it's tailed off to a large degree.

Also, dunno about you, but I'm specifically a Carlsberg drinker and that's expensive here, so the drinking at home is much less than it was. Never could handle Vodka or wine. Always drank it like it was beer and ended up shedded in about five minutes.
 
I quit about 15 years ago, I have a couple of whiskies once or twice a year and the very occasional bottle of cider (pint)
I quit because I was a proper ******** in drink.

Doesn't matter how sensible I was sober, give me a skinful of drink and I would drive.
I would shag anything female and breathing, regardless of the consequences and I wasn't particularly discrete about it.

For the first couple of years I would go on a bender once or twice a year and sure enough I'd behave like an ******** again. I can't claim that I'm always a pleasant fella when I'm sober but I'm certainly better than I was when drunk.

Most of the friends I have now have never seen me in drink and I like it that way.

The first day I didn't have a drink everyone thought I'd been taken ill in a big way.
I spent the first few weeks fairly shamefaced at the things I had done whilst pissed.

I don't regret quitting for a moment, I never wake up not knowing where I am, who the woman next to me is, where I put the car, who I offended or which mate isn't going to speak to me for a month or two.
Waking up next to some woman and saying "who are you, where am I and do you know where I left my car?" can be a tad embarrassing.

The longer you don't drink the less you miss it.
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
To be honest, most of us probably drink because of boredom, or because we are in a rut and that supermarkets make it easier to get mullared to ease that boredom. I certainly tend to drink more at home because it is a hell of a lot cheaper to get a case of 12 or 20 cans of Carlsberg from ASDA or Lidl than to go to the pub and buy 5 or 6 pints of the same drink. I probably do drink more than I should but I try and be "sensible" and give it a good long rest for a while between binges, and that's what they are if we are all being honest.
 
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