Concorde & the Eclipse

I assume that 001 was scheduled for mothballing/decommissioning.

Otherwise the response to the question "can we borrow your insanely expensive prototype aircraft, cut holes in it, fill it with electronic kit and chase an eclipse across Africa" would probably have been "farque orrff, vous murst be jerkin".

Well done the Frogs for not only agreeing to what might be considered a stupid question but also coughing up the cash.
 
No real need for it nowadays with the ISS, Hubble and dozens of other satellites monitoring the entire EM spectrum 24/7.

The British response was rather dismal TBH.
 
No real need for it nowadays with the ISS, Hubble and dozens of other satellites monitoring the entire EM spectrum 24/7.

The British response was rather dismal TBH.
It did say that the British were still testing their airframe as they were behind the French.
 
This is the stuff they need to teach in schools. This would show kids much more about maths, physics, astronomy etc etc.
There was a doco on a 747 that goes up with a huge telescope as well? 14 hour plus flight plan for it?
 

endure

GCM
"Just taxiing for take-off, the Concorde burned more fuel than a 737 flying from London to Amsterdam,"

What a stunning bit of kit the Concorde is.

I've got a book about it written by its chief design engineer, Ted Talbot.

Apparently one of the big problems they had was slowing down the air flowing into the engines to below 500 knots. They put flaps the size of wardrobe doors inside the engine air intakes that could open or close almost instantaneously.
 
"Just taxiing for take-off, the Concorde burned more fuel than a 737 flying from London to Amsterdam,"

What a stunning bit of kit the Concorde is.

I've got a book about it written by its chief design engineer, Ted Talbot.

Apparently one of the big problems they had was slowing down the air flowing into the engines to below 500 knots. They put flaps the size of wardrobe doors inside the engine air intakes that could open or close almost instantaneously.
The one time we have gone backwards in technology? When Concorde was withdrawn, the travel time of a civilian was greatly reduced.
 
The one time we have gone backwards in technology? When Concorde was withdrawn, the travel time of a civilian was greatly reduced.
Civilian's never really got to use Concorde though, it was a once in a lifetime expense for the average person...

that being said, I miss it and I want the next gen concorde and next gen space shuttle in the skies.
 

don_ten

Old-Salt
Why did Concorde get binned? I dreamt of flying in it when I was a young lad and now that I could possibly have the disposable income to take a trip it's gone.

Anyone building/trialling something similar?
 

don_ten

Old-Salt
Just imagine the pilot saying over the intercom, "ladies and gentleman we are now supersonic"

Wow.
 
Civilian's never really got to use Concorde though, it was a once in a lifetime expense for the average person...

that being said, I miss it and I want the next gen concorde and next gen space shuttle in the skies.
They knew it as well. Things moved on, fuel became more expensive, newer aircraft got larger and more economical to run.

They figured that the wealthy and business users would cough for the much higher fares for the reduced travel time and the experience. Which they did.

And I will always believe we got stuffed over by the Septics and their influence on other countries.
 

endure

GCM
I used to see it at Heathrow if I was flying out to join a ship. It's quite surprising just how small it is in real life.
 
They knew it as well. Things moved on, fuel became more expensive, newer aircraft got larger and more economical to run.

They figured that the wealthy and business users would cough for the much higher fares for the reduced travel time and the experience. Which they did.

And I will always believe we got stuffed over by the Septics and their influence on other countries.
No. Well not directly. Concorde had orders from Pan Am (indeed a launch customer), Continental, American, TWA, Eastern, United and Braniff. That's 7 US airlines (vs the 4 European orders).

What did for Concorde was the 1973 oil crisis. Oil went from $3 a barrel to $12. If your fuel is going to be 4x as expensive, then thirsty aeroplanes that only hold 100 passengers are doomed. Which is exactly what happened.

If you want to say the US is to blame, then perhaps supplying US arms to Israel in the Yom Kippur thing was the trigger for the oil crisis, when the Arabs shut supply off. But that fcuked a lot of things up beyond just thirsty aeroplanes.
 

HarryBosch

War Hero
I used to see it at Heathrow if I was flying out to join a ship. It's quite surprising just how small it is in real life.
I was surprised at just how loud it was when I began teaching in Hayes and Harlington (2000 - 2002!).

IIRC we pretty much knew the exact time we'd have to close the windows and stop teaching.

I'm not sure, but I think she was also flying in the evening back then, too.

Edited for sober structure.
 
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I was surprised at just how loud it was, when I began teaching in Hayes and Harlington (I taught there for the challenge of it, 2000 - 2002!).

IIRC we could pretty much time when we'd have to close the classroom windows and stop speaking.

I'm not sure but I think she was also flying in the evening back then too.
I used to live near Guildford at that time. It was great watching Concorde and hearing her make her presence known to the other hoi poloi aircraft going into Heathrow. It was like watching an Aston Martin cruise through a flock of Ford Fiestas. That's how a SciFi fan expected The Future to look and sound.

One of the interesting points about Concorde is that the aircraft is rarely spoken of using the indefinite article. Whilst you may have heard "Oh, look, a 747", you would rarely (if ever) hear "Oh, look, a Concorde", it was (almost) always "Look! Concorde!! :1:".
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
No. Well not directly. Concorde had orders from Pan Am (indeed a launch customer), Continental, American, TWA, Eastern, United and Braniff. That's 7 US airlines (vs the 4 European orders).

What did for Concorde was the 1973 oil crisis. Oil went from $3 a barrel to $12. If your fuel is going to be 4x as expensive, then thirsty aeroplanes that only hold 100 passengers are doomed. Which is exactly what happened.

If you want to say the US is to blame, then perhaps supplying US arms to Israel in the Yom Kippur thing was the trigger for the oil crisis, when the Arabs shut supply off. But that fcuked a lot of things up beyond just thirsty aeroplanes.
There was a rather concerted campaign against it based on noise.
 

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