Compare and Contrast - Our Aussie Sister Corps Journal

combatintman

War Hero
The Aussie R&L equivalent with all of the who got married, posted and who won the footy is a newsletter type thing that comes out annually. The Bridges Review comes out every two years.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
The Aussie R&L equivalent with all of the who got married, posted and who won the footy is a newsletter type thing that comes out annually. The Bridges Review comes out every two years.
Useful to know, but it still leaves them with a very useful professional publication for which we have no equivalent. That kind of makes up for AUSTINT still wearing chippy blue berets, somehow.
 
And it’s greener.
Snigger. I am aware of the pre-existence and slightly different shade. Still, gently teasing is so much better with bites. Like GIAO's "chippy blue beret" dig :)

I've never seen it, but a couple of Special Pen Service berets in an INT CORPS parade must look a bit weird.
 
Snigger. I am aware of the pre-existence and slightly different shade. Still, gently teasing is so much better with bites. Like GIAO's "chippy blue beret" dig :)

I've never seen it, but a couple of Special Pen Service berets in an INT CORPS parade must look a bit weird.
God...how I miss the old Side Cap!!!!
 

combatintman

War Hero
Useful to know, but it still leaves them with a very useful professional publication for which we have no equivalent. That kind of makes up for AUSTINT still wearing chippy blue berets, somehow.
When we get to wear them of course - I am required to wear Hat KFF (officially Khaki Fur Felt but I call it Khaki F*ck Fight) or more commonly known as the Slouch Hat to work. It is an incredibly impractical form of head dress.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
When we get to wear them of course - I am required to wear Hat KFF (officially Khaki Fur Felt but I call it Khaki F*ck Fight) or more commonly known as the Slouch Hat to work. It is an incredibly impractical form of head dress.
I did wonder at the one picture of a young Aussie Captain wearing a beret, given your current head shed AIF worship.
 

combatintman

War Hero
I did wonder at the one picture of a young Aussie Captain wearing a beret, given your current head shed AIF worship.
Not quite - berets stopped being streng verboten in about 2013 - until then it was exactly as you describe however of course individual units have their own dress policies and as Sir Harry Flashman has said lots of folk actually like wearing the Slouchie.

I'm not a complete Slouchie hater by any means - I think it is entirely appropriate on parade and on representational duty but for cutting around camp it is a PITA.

Of course if you are that interested/bored regarding Australian Army Dress Regs here is the pam:

Army Dress Manual | Australian Army

Otherwise - you're right about the young Aussie Captain - I remember him as a subbie and I ain't been here that long ;)
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Of course if you are that interested/bored regarding Australian Army Dress Regs here is the pam:

Army Dress Manual | Australian Army

Otherwise - you're right about the young Aussie Captain - I remember him as a subbie and I ain't been here that long ;)
That's a charming offer and I'll just take a moment, here, to calibrate the extent of my interest in Australian Army Dress Regs - right, done - thanks again and I'll make sure to follow that link... at a juncture :D

What did strike me, apart from a certain hilarity at the WO2 whinging about his fat and non-leadership-competent mates (and isn't he going to have a torrid time in the Mess?) was the professional content, provided by Pte-Maj, not all of which was utter bollocks and quite a lot of which was interesting and thought-provoking.

The focus was, of course, heavily Bde/Combat Int, I can't help wondering where the voice of the, um, strategic community was in the publication.
 
Do I need to worry that I know and am very fond of several science fiction books mentioned in the journal?

I think, with respect, he missed a brilliant read in the genre he quotes

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Do I need to worry that I know and am very fond of several science fiction books mentioned in the journal?

I think, with respect, he missed a brilliant read in the genre he quotes

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
Pretty much anything by Stephenson, with the possible exception of 'Seveneves' - 'The Baroque Cycle' and 'Reamde' in particular.
 
In the days before Amazon, my then girlfriend and her mother were in Boston on holiday.

I had asked her to buy me that book, as it was out in America in advance of here.

As she walked around kindly trying to find it, she explained to her mum "Boumer want me to buy him a book, It's not out yet"

"Will we get it through customs?" Was apparently her mum's immedia reply.

(Apparently my slightly subversive nature was not lost on my other half's parents)
 
Pretty much anything by Stephenson, with the possible exception of 'Seveneves' - 'The Baroque Cycle' and 'Reamde' in particular.
Surprised that "The Windup Girl" made the list - I thought it was good, not great. The article's author suggests SF as a way of thinking asymmetrically - but only comes up with "first-order" asymmetry, i.e. "use existing stuff in new ways", "think of how our world might change".

An extension to the article might have been to suggest fiction originally written in another culture - after all, the whole point of J2 is to have an insight into "the other side". For instance, Kyrill Yeskov wrote a fascinating sequel to "The Lord of the Rings" which is also an insight into a Russian way of thinking. The smart move for an Australian might have been to suggest Liu Cixin...

Here's an article on the subject of insider/outsider writing by Aliette de Bodard

Our tastes are (after all) on view in the Science Fiction thread... dystopian futures have been done better, William Gibson being another classic case in point (for AI, and a zaibatsu-filled future) and Walter Jon Williams (his "Dark State" was perfectly-timed look at the power of social media, it came out just before the Arab Spring IIRC). Charles Stross did AR neatly in "Halting State", and Adam Roberts did something original for warfare in "New Model Army".
 
Last edited:

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Shhhh. I've got Charlie's latest on the Kindle and am busy.
 
Surprised that "The Windup Girl" made the list - I thought it was good, not great. The article's author suggests SF as a way of thinking asymmetrically - but only comes up with "first-order" asymmetry, i.e. "use existing stuff in new ways", "think of how our world might change".

An extension to the article might have been to suggest fiction originally written in another culture - after all, the whole point of J2 is to have an insight into "the other side". For instance, Kyrill Yeskov wrote a fascinating sequel to "The Lord of the Rings" which is also an insight into a Russian way of thinking. The smart move for an Australian might have been to suggest Liu Cixin...

Here's an article on the subject of insider/outsider writing by Aliette de Bodard

Our tastes are (after all) on view in the Science Fiction thread... dystopian futures have been done better, William Gibson being another classic case in point (for AI, and a zaibatsu-filled future) and Walter Jon Williams (his "Dark State" was perfectly-timed look at the power of social media, it came out just before the Arab Spring IIRC). Charles Stross did AR neatly in "Halting State", and Adam Roberts did something original for warfare in "New Model Army".
Bah. No mention of Larry Niven or Jack Vance. Antipodean heathen.
 
How can you not like the baroque cycle? Heathen.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top