Commissioning from the ranks

Discussion in 'Officers' started by gmph1, Jan 12, 2010.

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  1. Hey all,

    Im a 23 year old Ammunition Technician (AT) and have been in the Army since the age of 17 and passed the AT course in 2003. I have always wanted to commission at some point regardless of LE or DE. I have recently being given my A/Sgt and as such my opinion of doing a full career has gone from a possibly to a certantly.

    As such, I wish to get the best out of my remaining time in the forces. I currently have the best part of 16+ years to push and was wondering what, in your opinion is the best route to take. Stay as a Soldier and steadily progress through the ranks and possibly one day be given a late entry commisssion or dive in now and see what happens with the direct entry?

    I am more than aware that military clicks are fical and even the inclination that you wish to leave your current trade/job/role can lead to the label of deserter within the trade group which you serve so wish to know any pros and cons that anyone can suggest.

    Any and all answers appreciated.
     
  2. You're still young enough to enjoy a year or two in the Sgts Mess then go to Sandhurst. Life in the Sgts mess can be fantastic but if you are really keen on a personal challenge (notwithstanding you already being an AT), go for a commission or go for something else that is non-routine (SF, SD, Pilot etc).

    The fact is that SNCO - WO - LE careers are deliberately more structured, to keep you in your specialisation as long as possible. DE careers are far more diverse by their nature (generalist versus specialist), although diversity is not necessarily the same as exciting.

    Go for commission mate.
     
  3. If you are educationally qualified my recommendation is a DE commission. Your career would be more diverse; with greater opportunity for command (if that's your bag); but I would assume (having no direct knowledge) that you would probably spend less time in your current field. If you are seriously considering it you need to look closely at 1st-3rd tour jobs of the DE officer throughout your Corps (ie could you see yourself being employed thus for 6 years), then promotion prospects and longer term appointing, finally the critical ages/experience involved in promotion/employment and balance this against a OR career with the possibility of LE.

    IMD
     
  4. You might also want to consider how much of a comedown it will be leaving the Sergeants' Mess and spending a year at Sandhurst followed by around six months of special-to-arm training, during which you will be treated like a child.
    On my Royal Signals young officer training at Blandford was a lad who'd been a corporal for some time and he thoroughly resented the manner in which he was spoken to. The simple answer is suck it up and carry on, but with your considerable training and experience you might get the hump, too. Just a thought.

    Also, depending on the current rules you might find that your time as an officer at regimental duty is very limited. I managed all of six years at RD (troop commander, squadron 2IC, adjt) before being dragged off to be a staff officer. That was the nail in the coffin - I am now a civilian.
     
  5. Sorry for resurrecting a dead thread, however I couldn't find an answer to my question, on ARRSE, the Army Website or Google.
    What is the maximum age 'deadline' for someone who wishes to commission from the ranks? I've seen regular officers are required to start the commissioning course before their 28th birthday, I was wondering if that's the same for ORs?
     
  6. As at 2003 it was something along the lines of:

    You have to be within your 29th year upon entry to Sandhurst.

    I wouldnt have thought it would have changed a lot since then.
     
  7. Interceptor- no wonder you left. Clearly you didnt know what you were getting yourself in for! I went to RMAS after 5 years in ranks and 18 years on remains the singlke best thing i ever did in my life!
     
  8. Albeit a tad late in reply, you have to start the Commissioning Course before your 29th birthday.
     
  9. Not sure thats right Daxx, I think you just have to be IN RMAS during your 29th year...?
     
  10. "Im a 23 year old Ammunition Technician" (Born 1987)

    "...been in the Army since the age of 17" (Served 6 years then since 2004)

    "...passed the AT course in 2003" (A year before you joined)

    That works out that you passed the AT course when you were 16 years old.

    I have no idea how long an AT course is, but your DTG's sound odd to me.
     
  11. terroratthepicnic

    terroratthepicnic LE Reviewer Book Reviewer
    1. ARRSE Runners

    Can you not apply for an over 30's commission anymore?

    If I remeber correctly someone over 30 and a CPL/SGT or above could apply for it. I'm sure I know of at least one person who did and as far as I can remember, her husband applied a year or so later.
     
  12. I don't think that they have done this for quite a while now.
    whf
     
  13. I think you're referring to an LE Commission. It's quite common, however you are recommended, selected and chosen for LE commissioning rather than apply for it.
     
  14. Nickhere,

    Not quite, everyone has to apply for a commission, both DE and LE.

    Different arms and services approach this in different ways.

    SASC/PTI Corps - Only commission from their own.
    AGC - Accept applications from anyone at the rank of SSgt and above (with X amount of years served).
    AAC - Accept applications from any cap badge.
    R Signals - Accept mainly from R Signals and, less exceptional circumstances, only from WO1s.
    Thats just off the top of my head.....

    There is no blanket rule regarding LE commissions, each capbadge sets their own criteria but in EVERY instance you have to apply, be interviewed, tested, boarded and then selected (or not).

    Clearly ,any application is unlikely to be successful unless supported with a recommendation from the CoC.