Commemoration of Black and Asian troops..

3123

Clanker
Sorry if this has been done but can’t see it anywhere as yet.

I think this is a relevant and poignant topic, worthy of discussion.


I didn’t know that, and admittedly have never given a great deal of though to, despite having visited graves in northern France and having a great uncle who fell during WW1, commemoration and recognition of commonwealth / others who served and fell are seemingly not remembered lamented and applauded in the same familiar manner.

I know that there are ARRSErs who are far better placed and educated to comment and offer input here, it would be interesting to read opinions and perhaps learn more about this.
 
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Sorry if this has been done but can’t see it anywhere as yet.

I think this is a relevant and poignant topic, worthy of discussion.

What, like the thousands of Asian (Indian and even Chinese) names on graves in Flanders? On the South Downs above Brighton there is a Chattri where the bodies of Indian troops who died of wounds in the hospitals set up for them in the town. All of their names are inscribed on the memorial. How about the many thousands of white troops who have no known grave, or the ones marked 'a soldier known unto God'. This has all been kicked off by David Lammy who is stirring the sh!t to score political points. Whilst I already had a low opinion of Lammy, to use our war dead to pursue a BLM agenda is despicable and marks a new low for the man - particularly as he has never served.
 
All the modern day hand-wringing and cringeworthy apologies won't alter the fact that attitudes were different many years ago. It was what it was. By the standards of today, some things that took place or were done were indeed "wrong" or "unacceptable", but that's judging by what is believed by many today.

Where does the line get drawn? Should modern governments or organisations apologise for the Battle of Agincourt, or the Hundred Years War? For me, leave the past as it was and move on. It's what we do today that counts.

And breathe....
 

3123

Clanker
What, like the thousands of Asian (Indian and even Chinese) names on graves in Flanders? On the South Downs above Brighton there is a Chattri where the bodies of Indian troops who died of wounds in the hospitals set up for them in the town. All of their names are inscribed on the memorial. How about the many thousands of white troops who have no known grave, or the ones marked 'a soldier known unto God'. This has all been kicked off by David Lammy who is stirring the sh!t to score political points. Whilst I already had a low opinion of Lammy, to use our war dead to pursue a BLM agenda is despicable and marks a new low for the man - particularly as he has never served.

This is maybe where my lack of perception comes from, when I’ve seen graves of multiple nationalities and commemorations appear to include all participants for example on remembrance day?

I can understand how some may see this from a political point scoring perspective but the report talks about commemoration and then goes on to give pause for thought on the values and culture of the day based around perceived discrimination.

Is the standpoint that we don’t commemorate the fallen fully regardless of race a valid one?
 
This is maybe where my lack of perception comes from, when I’ve seen graves of multiple nationalities and commemorations appear to include all participants for example on remembrance day?

I can understand how some may see this from a political point scoring perspective but the report talks about commemoration and then goes on to give pause for thought on the values and culture of the day based around perceived discrimination.

Is the standpoint that we don’t commemorate the fallen fully regardless of race a valid one?
I seem to remember that after the Royal Family have laid their wreaths at the Cenotaph on Remembrance Sunday, representatives of all the Commonwealth countries go up and lay theirs.

This is nothing more than Professor Olusoga (who made the documentary) and Lammy (who narrated it, who else) dragging up old history as a another stick to beat old whitey with.
 
This is nothing more than Professor Olusoga (who made the documentary) and Lammy (who narrated it, who else) dragging up old history as a another stick to beat old whitey with.
Or - as posted on another thread - a further indirect attack on the recent CRED report, aided and abetted by the Beeb, by a couple of professional race warriors, whose "industry" depends on maintaining the perception that everything is raaaacist.
 
Brighton was typical of the racist attitude pervading UK of the time.

All they could do was open a palace for the wounded Sikhs, Hindus and Muslims, provide separate areas for worship.

It had 9 different kitchens to cater for the dietary requirements of religious and varying caste needs.

I bet that doesn't get mentioned.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
This is maybe where my lack of perception comes from, when I’ve seen graves of multiple nationalities and commemorations appear to include all participants for example on remembrance day?

I can understand how some may see this from a political point scoring perspective but the report talks about commemoration and then goes on to give pause for thought on the values and culture of the day based around perceived discrimination.

Is the standpoint that we don’t commemorate the fallen fully regardless of race a valid one?
Why don't you go to the CWGC cemetery at Alamein, see how we commemorate the fallen of a multi-national force and stop bothering the rest of us with your inane wittering.

If you can't be bothered to do that, visit the mosque at Regents Park which was formal recognition of the loyalty and service of the British Empire's Moslem elements.
 

3123

Clanker
I seem to remember that after the Royal Family have laid their wreaths at the Cenotaph on Remembrance Sunday, representatives of all the Commonwealth countries go up and lay theirs.

This is nothing more than Professor Olusoga (who made the documentary) and Lammy (who narrated it, who else) dragging up old history as a another stick to beat old whitey with.
I wonder if any ARRSE cohort can comment as to the comment that some cultures wouldn’t recognise the symbolism of having a grave in relation to the countries they are talking about in the news item.

I know it’s the BBC etc and as you point out the commentators are what they are.
 
Surely the real scandal would be the way those soldiers, living and dead, were treated in their own countries by post Independence administrations. Imagine how an Indian who'd fought in the Western Desert and Burma must have felt when his country denied him recognition but lauded Bose's traitors.
 
This is maybe where my lack of perception comes from, when I’ve seen graves of multiple nationalities and commemorations appear to include all participants for example on remembrance day?

I can understand how some may see this from a political point scoring perspective but the report talks about commemoration and then goes on to give pause for thought on the values and culture of the day based around perceived discrimination.

Is the standpoint that we don’t commemorate the fallen fully regardless of race a valid one?
I don't think that I've ever remembered the fallen in a racially segregated way, like most people I suppose.
The act of rememberance is racist.... who knew that?
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I think we should find more historic stuff to apologise for. I bet the board of Robinson's Jam are hiding under the duvet atm.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I think we should find more historic stuff to apologise for. I bet the board of Robinson's Jam are hiding under the duvet atm.
Whoa there, no need to go that far. Just look at the TV programme "On The Buses", not a dusky face in sight yet London Transport is over flowing with them.
 
Well they're definitely not commemorated at all at the CWGC cemetery at Taukkyan in Burma:

Black:

5913-1331168072-ff646371ead99f94f1f3f86029953234.jpg


Brown:

5912-1331168068-442f75b939fb5e6a278a641d7b7323f2.jpg


Those cremated:

5905-1331167195-329690b910cb86d901a9b8dde8e8db1a.jpg


And a sample of those with no known grave:

5911-1331167820-9c5faee5d248d633e37726e61345d864.jpg
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I wonder if any ARRSE cohort can comment as to the comment that some cultures wouldn’t recognise the symbolism of having a grave in relation to the countries they are talking about in the news item.

I know it’s the BBC etc and as you point out the commentators are what they are.

Why don't you stop posting like a journalist or a political axe grinder?

After WW1 there was no consensus as to what form commemoration should take and each country pretty much did its own thing.

To say that the CWGC is institutionally racist is demonstrably bollox and, as others have shown above, all the information you want is freely available on the internet you mong button-pressing wretch.
 

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