Comedians that are not funny but think they are

A lad who was in my class at Hendon met Kenneth Williams when he was posted to Kensington Police Station in early 1988. Not a word out of Ken though. He was on the mortuary slab, when the the new probationers posted to the station attend a post mortem as part of their Street Duties Training Course (known as puppy walking). The PM was being conducted on Ken as he committed suicide by taking an overdose.
Did he still have a stiiffy from his bumping into a leather clad man in SOHO ?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Did he still have a stiiffy from his bumping into a leather clad man in SOHO ?
signal-2021-05-22-110003.jpg
 
Jack Whitehall
Michael McIntyre
Jo Brand
Catherine Tate
Russell Howard

all totally unfunny, smug tw4ts
I used to like Catherine Tate , only because I liked looking at her rather large tits ,
She still has them , but she has lost a lot of her looks

the unfunny one to me is Jenny Eclair, although her joke about when her hubby pissed her off was really funny

" he pissed me off so I demand he goes down and ate me ..... just after I've been to the loo and wiped from back to front......... came up for air like a kid that's been eating a choc ice
 
She slips the stiletto between his shoulder-blades . . . so successfully, he doesn't even notice . . .

 
As someone has mentioned Eric Sykes along with others as writers; Sykes opened an office in Shepherd's Bush in the early 1960s, at the time he was writing 'Educating Archie' and Milligan was writing The Goons. Milligan became somewhat distracted after marrying for the first time and since he and Sykes knew each other, Sykes invited him to join him in the new office ( above a greengrocer shop in Uxbridge Rd). Later, Sykes invited two other writers - Simpson and Galton to join them, and the consortium became 'Associated London Scripts'. This company also had Tony Hancock for a while, Frankie Howerd and a bit later, Johnny Speight, Terry Nation and John Antrobus. Syke's secretary - Beryl Vertue - became business manager and eventually a huge name in agency terms.

Sykes was essentially a writer but did enjoy his forays into performing. He was also very deaf, which could have been a drawback but he managed to overcome that.
Other notable writers of the time were - as mentioned - Barry Cryer and Barry Took, Bob Monkhouse and Dennis Goodwin ( who wrote for Bob Hope, amongst others). Good writers were in huge demand. Whilst comedians were just appearing on stage or cabaret, then an act could be repeated often. Once radio came in then new material had to be found and quickly. Televisión only exacerbated the problem.


My bold.. I went to a company do many years ago, where he was the comedy turn & m/c. He was brilliant, lots of off the cuff snide/funny remarks about the other turns AND, he'd obviously done his homework, about our directors & senior managers.
His main comedy bit was when he came on stage and asked for any topic to be shouted out and he would do a quick joke about it, it overran by almost an hour and he never got caught out once by any topic thrown at him!!
 
Comedic actors and comedians are two different things

very true, some comedic actors are great raconteurs though & extremely amusing. This one with my namesake (can you imagine the stick I got when he was famous, especially as I was a very randy 6'3" rugby playing heterosexual), This is him with Parky

 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Tom Bastard Allen. About as funny as child pornography.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
very true, some comedic actors are great raconteurs though & extremely amusing. This one with my namesake (can you imagine the stick I got when he was famous, especially as I was a very randy 6'3" rugby playing heterosexual), This is him with Parky

Watching him discuss societal changes was interesting. He was a sharp observer.
 
par avion said:
I don't think he needed to go as far as Soho. There were plenty of funny boys in Earls Court.

Aussies ?


Living in Earls court Sq for 4 years on my return from Africa & getting a trainee managers job in London I can say with certainty, Rarely Aussies! There were certain pubs that were gay hangouts, IIRC the The Coleherne Arms public house was a gay pub in west London. Located at 261 Old Brompton Road, Earls Court, it was a popular landmark leather bar during the 1960's, 1970s and 1980s. & the Bolton pub. There was another one but I've forgotten it. Needless to say I avoided them all after the first v. brief visit checking the local hostelries out!.
The thing that made it great for me in the "Swinging Sixties" were the huge volume of birds staying at the Overseas Visitors Club, mainly antipodean, saffers, Rhodies or Canucks with the odd Septic bird, hence Kangaroo Valley.
After spending 3 years in NR where available birds were almost non existent, I was like a kid being let lose in an all you can eat sweetshop!! There was also the Zambezi club where you could often meet those who were from N & S Rhodesia, the local fuzz hung out there as well.
Being a poverty stricken trainee manager, there were quite a few very cheap cafe's like "The Stockpot" where you could get a v. cheap meal which filled you up.
People have no idea just how great it was then and think you were exaggerating it, no way, I was the only Brit in the bunch of lads I hung out with in my time there, we all had an absolute ball & enjoyed every minute!!
 
OC
I often think back to those times and compare it to today.
Where the **** did it go wrong?
My guess is the rise of useless self serving politicians of the last forty years.
The french had the right idea with the elite a while back.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
My bold.. I went to a company do many years ago, where he was the comedy turn & m/c. He was brilliant, lots of off the cuff snide/funny remarks about the other turns AND, he'd obviously done his homework, about our directors & senior managers.
His main comedy bit was when he came on stage and asked for any topic to be shouted out and he would do a quick joke about it, it overran by almost an hour and he never got caught out once by any topic thrown at him!!
He was brilliant at that sort of thing, as indeed were a lot of the old school who had come up the hard way, via clubs etc. Ted Ray, for example, was feared by hecklers as he was merciless when anyone tried it.
Sykes was one of our best writers of his time, and a very modest man too. His autobiography is well worth reading.

As an aside, some years ago I went to a stage play which was a recreation of 'Round the Horne' I'll have to have a look for the cast but it was utter brilliance, and I say that as someone who has every recording of #Beyond our Ken' and 'Round the Horne'. It was played out just as the radio show would be with everyone on stage, sitting in chairs waiting for their turn at the microphone. And the cast were superb, even the @ken Williams' character.
 
He was brilliant at that sort of thing, as indeed were a lot of the old school who had come up the hard way, via clubs etc. Ted Ray, for example, was feared by hecklers as he was merciless when anyone tried it.
Sykes was one of our best writers of his time, and a very modest man too. His autobiography is well worth reading.

As an aside, some years ago I went to a stage play which was a recreation of 'Round the Horne' I'll have to have a look for the cast but it was utter brilliance, and I say that as someone who has every recording of #Beyond our Ken' and 'Round the Horne'. It was played out just as the radio show would be with everyone on stage, sitting in chairs waiting for their turn at the microphone. And the cast were superb, even the @ken Williams' character.


There you go


 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
As an aside, some years ago I went to a stage play which was a recreation of 'Round the Horne' I'll have to have a look for the cast but it was utter brilliance, and I say that as someone who has every recording of #Beyond our Ken' and 'Round the Horne'. It was played out just as the radio show would be with everyone on stage, sitting in chairs waiting for their turn at the microphone. And the cast were superb, even the @ken Williams' character.
Seconded. It was bloody hilarious on stage, I left the theatre with my sides aching (Ken had been nowhere near me).
 
He was brilliant at that sort of thing, as indeed were a lot of the old school who had come up the hard way, via clubs etc. Ted Ray, for example, was feared by hecklers as he was merciless when anyone tried it.
Sykes was one of our best writers of his time, and a very modest man too. His autobiography is well worth reading.

As an aside, some years ago I went to a stage play which was a recreation of 'Round the Horne' I'll have to have a look for the cast but it was utter brilliance, and I say that as someone who has every recording of #Beyond our Ken' and 'Round the Horne'. It was played out just as the radio show would be with everyone on stage, sitting in chairs waiting for their turn at the microphone. And the cast were superb, even the @ken Williams' character.

There’s a bit of that on YouTube.
Brilliant.
 

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