Colin Pitchfork Decision. Should a child killer ever be released?

Chef

LE
True, it's part of the release process for lifers.
He has spent best part of 33 years inside, probably take more than a few day releases/home leaves to rehabilitate fully(?)

Consider; He's spent the best part of that time never seeing more than 60 yards distant, among other things.
Not been involved with vehicle traffic either (although some would wish he had :) ). Things move on, lifers rarely do.


I repeat, I'm not defending him, or those of his ilk.
Just making a point(s) I feel some may not appreciate.
The old convict in The Shawshank Redemption who kills himself shortly after release is probably indicative of what happens when one's taken out of the home one's known for decades.
 
The old convict in The Shawshank Redemption who kills himself shortly after release is probably indicative of what happens when one's taken out of the home one's known for decades.

I once read an article about an elderly convict at an American jail, who was released after decades inside. IIRC, the governor (ok the warder), created an apartment for him in the prison building, door to the outside, with a key and gave him a job as a civvy laundryman. So, he had a wage, somewhere to live, and still mixed with his old mates. At the same time, he was free to stay in bed or whatever on his days off, free to choose what and when he ate, free to go for a beer, or watch a game, have a day out somewhere.
 

jmb3296

LE
Book Reviewer
True, it's part of the release process for lifers.
He has spent best part of 33 years inside, probably take more than a few day releases/home leaves to rehabilitate fully(?)

Consider; He's spent the best part of that time never seeing more than 60 yards distant, among other things.
Not been involved with vehicle traffic either (although some would wish he had :) ). Things move on, lifers rarely do.


I repeat, I'm not defending him, or those of his ilk.
Just making a point(s) I feel some may not appreciate.
I think the point is well made. I do not think he has moved on during his time in prison although he will be more forensically aware, that’s what tripped him up last time.
If he reoffends I suspect he will be very careful about forensics, either by destruction or permanent concealment of the body.

slight thread drift but I will get back on track in the post.

I used to work beside the DCI that brought Peter Tobin to trial for the abduction, rape and murder of Vicky Hamilton.
Tobin is a serial killer and targeted young women for his gratification and then took great care to make sure the body was never found.
Vicky Hamilton was abducted in Bathgate, Her body was discovered years later on the south coast of England.

Tobin was undone when the body of his final victim Angelica Kluk was found under the floor of a church where he had been working under a false name.

I asked the DCI if Tobin preplanned or was an opportunist. The DCI said he was an Opportunist but everything was preplanned..

He explained Tobin spent every minute of every day planning his crime and when he had the opportunity he immediately took it.

He was always prepared, always ready and biding his time for that opportunity and would strike when it came along and he had isolated his victim.

it didn’t matter how long he waited, he would wait until he could do it.

Back to Pitchfork, He raped and murdered two young girls a considerable time apart. He obviously enjoyed it because he did it twice. He never suffered remorse or guilt or felt the need to confess, when the DNA trawl was done he persuaded someone else to take the sample test for him to attempt to evade capture. That was what got him caught.

if he is remotely like Tobin, or Robert Black another similar one, he is still a huge risk to young women and girls, he hasn’t moved on or changed. He doesn’t want to. He is likely just waiting until he can do it again, and try harder not to get caught.

sex offenders, particularly sex offenders of the scale of risk of Pitchfork, are very very difficult if not impossible to rehabilitate.

in his case I am firmly in the, only a whole life sentence adequately protects others from him, camp
 

Allan74

Old-Salt
In the 70's and 80's until the Government where held to account, a series of Home Secretaries would add extra years to life sentences as they saw fit/political expedience.
The inmate never new.
eg, the Judge gave a life sentence with a recommendation that a minimum of 14 years be served.
The Home Secretary in his experience/whim could add to to this term and do so regularly to many.
Bearing in mind that the previous experience judicial experience of the Home Secretary would have been Transport or Agriculture.

The up side of a a successful hanging would be it could not be doubled by a politician, though if memory serves, way back when some politico was dug up and re hung.

That aside, the above is similar to your local garage giving your car a MOT certificate and the Minister for Transport failing it.

With Pitchfork and his recall, a set up is possible, but not probable.
As yet, no one know why the vile creature has been recalled.
To be recalled does not take much if you do not fit in.
It could be anything from alchohol, drugs, gambling, curfew breach or kiddy porn. Who knows.


I believe it was said of the Birmingham 6, Guildford 4, Renault 5........................whatever...
......by a former Lord Chief Justice......"if we had hanged these people at the time we would not have to deal with their appeal"
Political expediency...or what the papers are saying...
 

Allan74

Old-Salt
Thanks Robroy. That's interesting.
I was under the impression that polygraph testing had been debunked, mainly for the reasons stated with Pitchfork(?)
Polygraph, I reckon, are junk science...it just gives authorities something to hide behind, 'How could we know X was a spy / molester, X passed the polygraph.'

There was the famous case in the USAF, where a USAF Police source in a drugs investigation sailed through a polygraph test when denying use of drugs but the urine test showed the source was off their face.
 

WhiteCrane

Old-Salt
Polygraph, I reckon, are junk science...it just gives authorities something to hide behind, 'How could we know X was a spy / molester, X passed the polygraph.'

There was the famous case in the USAF, where a USAF Police source in a drugs investigation sailed through a polygraph test when denying use of drugs but the urine test showed the source was off their face.
I heard Beta-blockers or pain can fool a test!
 
I would be happy for him to be released if he has been rehabilitated, by rehab I mean a painful, cancerous death.
One death could be an accident, two shows he’s beyond help and who knows what else he’s got away with. Life for life
 

surfincivi

Old-Salt
That worked in Dachau and Treblinka, when they were finally liberated, the prisoner guards, the Kapo, were rounded up by the very people they were put in charge of, and abusing, and lynched.

In modern terms, when the delegated" prisoner guards" are finally released, who do you think will be waiting for them on the outside. Cons hate any of their own who openly collaborate with the screws, the system, the establishment.
I’m sorry what’s the down side again?
 

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