Cold War Target Map (anticipated)

The owner of the cottage didn't know much about it. She thought it was a regional civilian command centre, like Kelvedon in its later role.
Okay, I think that I've got it. It is, I think, a Sector Operating Centre for the ROTOR radar system but was made redundant in 1960. Between 1966 and 1968 it was taken over by the Home Office for incorporation into the Regional Government organisation as a Sub-Regional Control (think Kelvedon lite) and was refurbished between 1976 and 1981. It was sold in 1996.
(Page 109 of "Cold War Secret Nuclear Bunkers" by Nick McCamley)
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
The number of ground bursts where the fireball touches the ground and immensely increases the contamination and fallout shows how Ivan merely planned to neutralise UK and leave it to rot rather than invade it, but ensure UK was no use for US support of NATO in continental Europe.

For famille Seaweed our holiday cottage in darkest Devon might have been useful, if we could have reached it in time. We could have starved to death there in relative comfort.
 

JCC

War Hero
The guardroom at Musgrave RUC barracks had a small room adjoining - arms locker, fresh batteries etc. There was also a gray box with a single wheel in the centre; the wheel controlled on/off and volume.

Nobody knew what the box meant but, vaguely, that it was something to do with nuclear war. Some times the guard turned it on and it went beep...beep...beep but mostly it was turned off. One night, at about two in the morning, it went whee....whee...wheeeee but it was quickly turned off which, I like to think, prevented a war.
 
Mid-1990s there was a documentary programme on BBC which examined an actual Soviet targeting list, obtained from some deep archive. Might have been Timewatch, something in that genre.

Maps derived from the list were available for download from the BBC website ( yes they had one back then ), which I clearly remember because I could only download a few slowly, on the college network, and could save only one per floppy disk. Sadly long since lost to bit-rot.

Anyway, the target list for NI included at least Derry, Larne, Belfast Lough shores ( to be utterly plastered ) and Armagh. The sea-ports made sense but the latter always puzzled me, perhaps something to do with contingency government or the observatory there.
 
the target list for NI included ...Armagh. The sea-ports made sense but the latter always puzzled me, perhaps something to do with contingency government or the observatory there.
Being thorough, they wanted to ensure PIRA got their fair share.
 
On the flip-side I went to a talk by several-times-Vulcan-pilot Bill Perrins a while back - he's from NI.

His crew's target when he flew an armed Vulcan was Kiev, but he said the closest he gets to it now is flying to Hong Kong as a Virgin Atlantic pilot.

So I asked him - "Do you ever think about what you were to do to Kiev, as you pass over it nowadays?"

"Nope. Didn't then and don't now. Just a place on the map."

And that's how they coped, I suppose.
 
Looking at scenes from the tower block fire in London, it kind of puts the cold war into context.

Look at all the resources that are tied up with just one building going up in flames.. it's given me an
glimpse into the utter chaos in urban areas and futility of civil defence there, if we had decided to open up our cans of instant sunshine

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:
With that target map being from the 80s, I'm so glad that Ringway was renamed Manchester International Airport in 1975. That fact, along with Manchesters nuclear free city status, would have meant they couldn't find us, and moreover if they did, their bombs wouldn't work within the city's boundaries...Amazes me that other city's didn't adopt this sensible plan to prevent nuclear catastrophe?!
 
With that target map being from the 80s, I'm so glad that Ringway was renamed Manchester International Airport in 1975. That fact, along with Manchesters nuclear free city status, would have meant they couldn't find us, and moreover if they did, their bombs wouldn't work within the city's boundaries...Amazes me that other city's didn't adopt this sensible plan to prevent nuclear catastrophe?!
I grew up in Harlow. It was a 'Nuclear Free Zone' (with signs at the town boundary too). With Stansted, Colchester and half the USAF within 50 miles, it's good to know we would have been safe.
 
Last edited:
With that target map being from the 80s, I'm so glad that Ringway was renamed Manchester International Airport in 1975. That fact, along with Manchesters nuclear free city status, would have meant they couldn't find us, and moreover if they did, their bombs wouldn't work within the city's boundaries...Amazes me that other city's didn't adopt this sensible plan to prevent nuclear catastrophe?!
True, the nuclear free zone at Manchester also had giant fans to waft the nuclear fallout (that use to be Leeds) away from the city and towards Liverpool

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
 
nuclearplaque.jpg


This is all you need to nullify those Rusky bombs...Imagine if some clever individual had replaced the name Manchester, with the name Britain? Could have saved us all a shitload of wedge and gave us total peace of mind!
 
True, the nuclear free zone at Manchester also had giant fans to waft the nuclear fallout (that use to be Leeds) away from the city and towards Liverpool

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

You're just being mean Tibs.
 

TamH70

MIA
Wonder why Glasgow Airport at Abbotsinch in Paisley didn't appear on the map. It's got a 747 and bigger rated runway.
 
The guardroom at Musgrave RUC barracks had a small room adjoining - arms locker, fresh batteries etc. There was also a gray box with a single wheel in the centre; the wheel controlled on/off and volume.

Nobody knew what the box meant but, vaguely, that it was something to do with nuclear war. Some times the guard turned it on and it went beep...beep...beep but mostly it was turned off. One night, at about two in the morning, it went whee....whee...wheeeee but it was quickly turned off which, I like to think, prevented a war.
Probably one of the WB units, WB1400 HANDEL Pt1 half way down the page there are a couple of audio examples
 
Wonder why Glasgow Airport at Abbotsinch in Paisley didn't appear on the map. It's got a 747 and bigger rated runway.
Not at time map was made. Prestwick airport was always bigger, it hosted the Space Shuttle on its piggyback European tour around 1982. Prestwick is also a major diversion Airport by virtue of fact can take aircraft others can't and only fog free UK airport. Only one with extra runway at 90° angle "L-shape".
 

TamH70

MIA
Not at time map was made. Prestwick airport was always bigger, it hosted the Space Shuttle on its piggyback European tour around 1982. Prestwick is also a major diversion Airport by virtue of fact can take aircraft others can't and only fog free UK airport. Only one with extra runway at 90° angle "L-shape".
Pretty informative answer, thanks. I wouldn't bet against Glasgow Airport being on a target map now, though, along with major motorway and railway intersections and the like.
 
With that target map being from the 80s, I'm so glad that Ringway was renamed Manchester International Airport in 1975. That fact, along with Manchesters nuclear free city status, would have meant they couldn't find us, and moreover if they did, their bombs wouldn't work within the city's boundaries...Amazes me that other city's didn't adopt this sensible plan to prevent nuclear catastrophe?!
Derby did in the 80s'. Declared itself a nuclear free zone - apart from a tinsey winsey little bit in the middle where Rolls Royce developed the reactors for the Trafalgar class SSNs
 

jones54

Swinger
I will see if i can digitise some photos i took after we had been 'stood down'. Some are of the inside of a monitoring post near where i used to live.
I will check the SOP's i have in the loft ref AWDRY , once the weather has cooled!! Someone i spoke to last nigt was chattering about the monitoring posts and i mentioned that the temperature remained stable all year round (52 degrees F i think). I know of a farmer who has converted one on his land to a wine cellar....excellent move.

Oxford Brookes uni bought the Oxford control and wanted to convert it into a night club. Health and safety intervened due to inadaquate fire escape routes. I think it is used for storage now.
 

Latest Threads

Top