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Cold War Photos.

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
There were some upsides to the Cold War, even in 1980:

50.jpg



That photo was taken outside what is now HQ 104 Log Bde!
 
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Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Considering Mann published it in 1924, that might just undermine the Arguement. Funny to think me and the Missus stayed in DAvos a mile or so from the Sanitorium where Mann’s wife was 60 odd years later

I know when it was published.
 
Sad news:
He was appointed Operations Officer with the British Commanders-in-Chief Mission to the Soviet Forces in Germany (BRIXMIS) in 1978. The compact whereby the British and Soviet forces exchanged military liaison missions remained in force from 1946 until the reunification of Germany in 1990.

Ritchie proved to be a natural in this clandestine world and employed his language skills and personal charm to defuse difficult and often dangerous situations. It did not always work, and he was with a tour team when it was rammed by a Soviet Scud missile launcher. Fortunately, his vehicle was reinforced with half a ton of armour plating and he survived.

After many run-ins with the East German Stasi, his luck deserted him when, having spent all night in a ditch in order to photograph newly commissioned Russian military equipment, he was captured. On his return to England, he was awarded a well-deserved MBE for his service

 
One thing that dawned on me in Berlin that I should have taken photos of the sights before they became so common place that I stopped even looking at them. An example is the theatre where they filmed the indoor scenes of the film Cabaret. I drove past it twice or more per week on the way to CP C but never got the driver to pull over so I could take a picture, nor did I ever visit it in my own time. It was only when we had visitors that I started recording what I might never see again.

This is the view east from Ernst Reuter Platz showing the Siegessäule and the Pope's Revenge (Fernsehturm) in the distance.

View east from Ernst Reuter Platz a.jpg


Siegessäule and Fernsehturm again.

img091aa.jpg


Typical traffic congestion in the Soviet Sector and the reason for the Fernsehturm being known as the Pope's Revenge is clear. Also the Rotes Rathaus can just be seen in the middle distance on the right.

img405.jpg
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
One thing that dawned on me in Berlin that I should have taken photos of the sights before they became so common place that I stopped even looking at them. An example is the theatre where they filmed the indoor scenes of the film Cabaret. I drove past it twice or more per week on the way to CP C but never got the driver to pull over so I could take a picture, nor did I ever visit it in my own time. It was only when we had visitors that I started recording what I might never see again.

This is the view east from Ernst Reuter Platz showing the Siegessäule and the Pope's Revenge (Fernsehturm) in the distance.

View attachment 543416

Siegessäule and Fernsehturm again.

View attachment 543419

Typical traffic congestion in the Soviet Sector and the reason for the Fernsehturm being known as the Pope's Revenge is clear. Also the Rotes Rathaus can just be seen in the middle distance on the right.

View attachment 543421
Very true. You tended not to realise just how much you should have visited until it's too late.
 
Sad news:
He was appointed Operations Officer with the British Commanders-in-Chief Mission to the Soviet Forces in Germany (BRIXMIS) in 1978. The compact whereby the British and Soviet forces exchanged military liaison missions remained in force from 1946 until the reunification of Germany in 1990.

Ritchie proved to be a natural in this clandestine world and employed his language skills and personal charm to defuse difficult and often dangerous situations. It did not always work, and he was with a tour team when it was rammed by a Soviet Scud missile launcher. Fortunately, his vehicle was reinforced with half a ton of armour plating and he survived.

After many run-ins with the East German Stasi, his luck deserted him when, having spent all night in a ditch in order to photograph newly commissioned Russian military equipment, he was captured. On his return to England, he was awarded a well-deserved MBE for his service

He was a great boss and, an incredibly nice guy.

Never met anyone with a bad word to say about him.

He died of a stroke that came out of nowhere,absolute tragedy.
 
Very true. You tended not to realise just how much you should have visited until it's too late.

Indeed.

When I first worked in Cambodia there was an exceptionally large seasonal flood in Phnom Penh in 1999.

Remember this was - just - before camera phones and so it took a bit of effort to bring a camera to take pictures.

When I wasn’t in the field I commuted to the office in the north of the city from my rented house in the south. About 15 minutes by Hilux.

There were all sorts of boats, rafts and canoes pressed into service and life went on largely as normal as if Phnom Penh had become Venice. It lasted about 72 hours.

Not one picture did I take.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Indeed.

When I first worked in Cambodia there was an exceptionally large seasonal flood in Phnom Penh in 1999.

Remember this was - just - before camera phones and so it took a bit of effort to bring a camera to take pictures.

When I wasn’t in the field I commuted to the office in the north of the city from my rented house in the south. About 15 minutes by Hilux.

There were all sorts of boats, rafts and canoes pressed into service and life went on largely as normal as if Phnom Penh had become Venice. It lasted about 72 hours.

Not one picture did I take.


I generally had a camera or four with me and took tens of thousands of photos. Still, I failed to visit the wealth of opportunities to actually visit places and soak up information.

As retread said earlier, it was only when you had visitors that you actually went anywhere in Berlin and it tended to be to the same famous sights. Thereby missing hundreds of other opportunities.
 
"Araminta". Will our social betters ever refrain from marrying women with silly names?

Knowing Charlie Ritchie as I did...I suspect she is as erudite and jolly as he was. Given that,she would have any squaddie eating out of her hand,in about 10 seconds flat !

I would also comment that,Charles never considered himself a 'better' and, judged everybody on their ability to do the job. I recall one incident when as a the G2 Ops, he got a bollocking from a WRAC L/cpl about the layout of a report that was going to the MOD and other agencies. At the end of her 'critique' he apologised and left it to her and, 24 hours later a bunch of flowers appeared at her desk in the Orderly Room. He always bowed to expertise,regardless of Rank/Gender.
 

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