Cold War Photos.

I'm a big fan of Spargel, especially the white stuff with a hollandaise sauce.

Had some last night but it was green and it came from Peru.
We had a fantastic meal in a Mosel riverside inn whilst on a river cruise a few years ago. Gammon with boiled new potatoes, white asparagus and hollandaise sauce. Actually, we both like the green asparagus too.

As an aside, a former Army colleague from BAOR days (who was actually German) told me he had seen a sign in a hotel room which translated to: "Gentlemen, please do not pee in the handbasin. Especially in the asparagus season". ;)
 
Traveling on a German coach trip to Kaliningrad (East Prussia) we were the two Brits with the others all Germans with familly connections to the area. Passing Kaliningrad city (Konigsberg) an older German gentleman pointed pointed out some ditches. "They are anti-tank ditches, I helped to dig them when I was 16, not used as the Russians went round them". We went on to Sovietsk (Tilsit) with another German who told us his familly were not finally evicted until 1955. Went with him to find the familly village with the use of a 1935 map. Didn't find a thing, gone.
 
That would have had them laughing, a puncture on a track. Unless you were on a track and got a puncture.

Germans laughing at my vocabulary whilst simultaneously beholding the sight of my CVR(T) leaking oil and coolant into their asparagus? There’s a thought :)

I found that the Germans - unlike the French - were very forgiving of my mangling of their language.
 
Went with him to find the familly village with the use of a 1935 map. Didn't find a thing, gone.
interesting, but and here's the rub, Grandma was born in Chelchen NE of Warsaw. south of Koenigsberg. But it's now Chelchy. Didn't find it on a map, Jewish Stetlseeker had it and it's new name. Part of what was Sharkeyen province. That matched to the Stammbuch.
 
Mind it was funny when I was posted out there. I would speak in German and originally wondered about the funny look on their faces. Asked one why? Response was Oh you can speak German OK, just sounds like you haven't been here for ages.
 
interesting, but and here's the rub, Grandma was born in Chelchen NE of Warsaw. south of Koenigsberg. But it's now Chelchy. Didn't find it on a map, Jewish Stetlseeker had it and it's new name. Part of what was Sharkeyen province. That matched to the Stammbuch.
Not a name change issue here, nothing on the ground to see, if we'd gone into the weeds we might have found a few bricks. Why it was demolished is anybodies guess. The Russians probably needed the bricks for something else.
 
I find the phrase “Entshuldigung Sie bitte, I hab’ ein Panne mit meinem Panzer in Ihrem Spargelfeld” not to have been very useful since BAOR days, however.
Rather think the earlier version was 'I am sorry I parked my tank on your rose bushes'.
Did see a Combat team trash a field of sugar beet on a Divisional exercise in 1979, now that was a big damage claim not forgetting the miles of kerb stones the tanks cracked.
 
Not a name change issue here, nothing on the ground to see, if we'd gone into the weeds we might have found a few bricks. Why it was demolished is anybodies guess. The Russians probably needed the bricks for something else.
Ah you’ve stumbled on the grey area. No doubt the Germans could have eradicated it, conveniently, but then so little of what the Russians did would be admitted to. Your mention of 1955 may be a clue. I found some footage from my home town about the repatriation of some local prisoners from Russia that year, I would have been rising four, so don’t really remember
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Mind it was funny when I was posted out there. I would speak in German and originally wondered about the funny look on their faces. Asked one why? Response was Oh you can speak German OK, just sounds like you haven't been here for ages.

I had a meal in 1983 in the Ratskeller under the Koepenicker Rathaus in East Berlin. The waiter wished to practise his English which was wonderfully well enunciated. He'd learnt it by reading Charles Dickens.

It was like chatting to your great grandfather.


I went for the Eisbein.
 
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I had a meal in 1983 in the Ratskeller under the Koepernicker Rathaus in East Berlin. The waiter wished to practise his English which was wonderfully well enunciated. He'd learnt it by reading Charles Dickens.

It was like chatting to your great grandfather.


I went for the Eisbein.
Perhaps the reverse would be learning German from Der Hauptmann von Koepenick. It’s quite amusing.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Perhaps the reverse would be learning German from Der Hauptmann von Koepenick. It’s quite amusing.

My first one was 'Bahnwaerter Thiel' by Hauptmann back in the mid-1970s. Still haven't finished Thomas Mann's 'Zauberberg'.
 
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Sticking with the heavy metal side of things, Ex Reforger 87 - I had a role that saw me able to go a-wandering, and on the middle weekend I chanced upon a US Armoured concentration area where there was quite a bit of kit out and about - the Humvee's were pretty much brand new into service then for example, and the Bradley's were only a couple of years old
IMG_6056.JPG

M1A1 as seen from the turret of one of the Bradley's - that's my GS 3/4 Ton Land Rover with highly professional umpire marking!
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
My similar dit is from Denmark in 1981 (Ex Bold Guard, I think).

I dug my Platoon in and sited the GPMG at the the corner of the farmhouse with a good field of fire. The elderly farmer came out and said, ' The Reichswehr put it here in 1944'.

I was 2 yards out.
Reichswehr? In 1944? Were they time travellers?

I was in Denmark in '81 on Ex AMBER EXPRESS, is that the one you mean?
 
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