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Cold War Photos.

Vielleicht. I am from Yorkshire, after all.

Here's the links to Cardwell and Haldene:


Mmm. Yers. I’m not so sure that one should take the criticism of the Purchases too seriously. Let’s not forget that continental armies all tended to be officered by their aristocracies, nor did it follow that they were all cretins. It was certainly true that it tended to limit the gene pool, but good officers had to back themselves in order to progress. It was a serious business and effectively paid their pensions. People fixate on the Franco Prussian war, but lessons were also learned from the Austrian Prussian war and the Danish Prussian, the former being one of the last of the old style conflicts. I believe St Cyr was set up for the same basic reason. But those new acadamies also put out a “Set” mentality that can be blamed in part for the shortcomings of the first lot. The point about any officer set is that they are supposed to be superior, that’s why they happen to be officers.
incidentally I was doing some research on one of my English lot who served in 2LG during the Crimean era. They didn’t get allocated Crimea, but he still died in 1856 at home from Scarlet fever. Bad hygiene in Barracks
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Mmm. Yers. I’m not so sure that one should take the criticism of the Purchases too seriously. Let’s not forget that continental armies all tended to be officered by their aristocracies, nor did it follow that they were all cretins. It was certainly true that it tended to limit the gene pool, but good officers had to back themselves in order to progress. It was a serious business and effectively paid their pensions. People fixate on the Franco Prussian war, but lessons were also learned from the Austrian Prussian war and the Danish Prussian, the former being one of the last of the old style conflicts. I believe St Cyr was set up for the same basic reason. But those new acadamies also put out a “Set” mentality that can be blamed in part for the shortcomings of the first lot. The point about any officer set is that they are supposed to be superior, that’s why they happen to be officers.
incidentally I was doing some research on one of my English lot who served in 2LG during the Crimean era. They didn’t get allocated Crimea, but he still died in 1856 at home from Scarlet fever. Bad hygiene in Barracks

West Point was established at the same time. Must have been something in the water.
 
West Point was established at the same time. Must have been something in the water.
Which to me is somewhat Ironic because all sides had observers. The US civil war was largely a warning for the future, but was going on contemporary with the European conflicts, where they had the same shortcomings. So frankly it had to be the water.;)
 
I don't know, but I wouldn't be surprised.
I spent three weeks chaperoning a bunch of sprogs on a grape picking venture in Bernkastel (Moselle valley) in the early '70s The vinyard owner was a Herr Schreiber whose wife told me he had been released by the Russians in 1956. He was a quiet, but alert, slim and very fit - decent enough fellow. Frau Schreiber told me she had tended the vinyard waiting for his return despite little information. I liked them enough not to ask anything else.
 
I spent three weeks chaperoning a bunch of sprogs on a grape picking venture in Bernkastel (Moselle valley) in the early '70s The vinyard owner was a Herr Schreiber whose wife told me he had been released by the Russians in 1956. He was a quiet, but alert, slim and very fit - decent enough fellow. Frau Schreiber told me she had tended the vinyard waiting for his return despite little information. I liked them enough not to ask anything else.
I think that us Brits grew up with the idea that it was a marvellous adventure. Why not? We did, after all, stick it out. To the end.
One of my grandfathers had a grand war. He was almost sorry it ended. A pre-war regular, he carried on after and retired with about 37 years colour service.
My other grandad had a much worse experience. He was Polish, and most of his family were killed by the Russians. After being allowed to leave Russia, he went on to fight again.
Both splendid grandads.
Now we are at the risk of complete thread derail.
But it was a messy, compromised, strange world post WW2. I think there was a lot of conflict of opinion, tact, and the rest going on.
I have pictures of my dad (REME) in East Berlin mit flares and Mrs R in the same place (just).
Anyway, thanks to to guys that kept it going @Brotherton Lad and others, this was a great insight
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
I think that us Brits grew up with the idea that it was a marvellous adventure. Why not? We did, after all, stick it out. To the end.
One of my grandfathers had a grand war. He was almost sorry it ended. A pre-war regular, he carried on after and retired with about 37 years colour service.
My other grandad had a much worse experience. He was Polish, and most of his family were killed by the Russians. After being allowed to leave Russia, he went on to fight again.
Both splendid grandads.
Now we are at the risk of complete thread derail.
But it was a messy, compromised, strange world post WW2. I think there was a lot of conflict of opinion, tact, and the rest going on.
I have pictures of my dad (REME) in East Berlin mit flares and Mrs R in the same place (just).
Anyway, thanks to to guys that kept it going @Brotherton Lad and others, this was a great insight


It was a great privilege, as I've said before. The most useful lesson was that at least 95% of people (Soviet and East German) were pleasant and hospitable. It was the others you needed to identify. As soon as possible.
 
He wasn't in the hotseat for the reserve demolition, then?

Funny you should say that :)

We were doing demolition training on one bridge over the Spree in Berlin when an old geezer came to watch.

After a while he came up to me and pointed at the bridge.

“You are putting the charges in the wrong place”.

I asked him how he knew.

“In 1945 I was responsible for destroying this bridge. I put the charges where your men are putting them now. It did not work”.

He was spot on.

In WW2 - and later - British sappers used to use a ‘method of attack’ that had been found to sometimes only result in a partial demolition. In the 70’s Sheffield University had been commissioned to update the system used.

The Bridges in Berlin had been prepared for demolition after the Airlift, with things like access ladders welded in place. One of my jobs had been to update the demolition plans to be ‘Sheffield Study’ compliant but these changes were still secret. We still trained to the old charge placement. I couldn’t tell him I agreed with him...

In another incident the TA Engineer Troop were training on another bridge over the Spree. I’d done the calcs for the demolition and told them where to dig the firing point. They found a German helmet and some metal buckles off a set of German webbing.

I later found out that after the war the Germans rebuilt all the damaged bridges to the exact same design they had used before.
 
Mmm. Yers. I’m not so sure that one should take the criticism of the Purchases too seriously. Let’s not forget that continental armies all tended to be officered by their aristocracies, nor did it follow that they were all cretins. It was certainly true that it tended to limit the gene pool, but good officers had to back themselves in order to progress. It was a serious business and effectively paid their pensions. People fixate on the Franco Prussian war, but lessons were also learned from the Austrian Prussian war and the Danish Prussian, the former being one of the last of the old style conflicts. I believe St Cyr was set up for the same basic reason. But those new acadamies also put out a “Set” mentality that can be blamed in part for the shortcomings of the first lot. The point about any officer set is that they are supposed to be superior, that’s why they happen to be officers.
incidentally I was doing some research on one of my English lot who served in 2LG during the Crimean era. They didn’t get allocated Crimea, but he still died in 1856 at home from Scarlet fever. Bad hygiene in Barracks

Sapper and Gunner officers could never purchase commissions, what with needing to do sums. Hence - as B-L says, training at Woolwich.

The resulting differences in the commissioning dates between Chard and Bromhead is commemorated in a scene in Zulu to explain why Chard is in charge.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
My similar dit is from Denmark in 1981 (Ex Bold Guard, I think).

I dug my Platoon in and sited the GPMG at the the corner of the farmhouse with a good field of fire. The elderly farmer came out and said, ' The Reichswehr put it here in 1944'.

I was 2 yards out.
 
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Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Sapper and Gunner officers could never purchase commissions, what with needing to do sums. Hence - as B-L says, training at Woolwich.

The resulting differences in the commissioning dates between Chard and Bromhead is commemorated in a scene in Zulu to explain why Chard is in charge.

Indeed, they were granted their Commissions on successful completion of their courses by the Master Gunner and the Engineer-in-Chief.
 
This is what was formerly known as the Kongresshalle Conference Hall in the Tiergarten district. It was a gift from the US. Berliners called it the Pregnant Oyster or Jimmy Carter's Teeth.

img382.jpg


On May 21, 1980, the roof collapsed, killing one and injuring numerous people. Better go and have a look, we thought.

Kongress Halle a.jpg


The hall was rebuilt in its original style and reopened in 1987 in time for the 750-year anniversary of the founding of Berlin. It is now known as Haus der Kulturen der Welt.
 
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Sapper and Gunner officers could never purchase commissions, what with needing to do sums. Hence - as B-L says, training at Woolwich.

The resulting differences in the commissioning dates between Chard and Bromhead is commemorated in a scene in Zulu to explain why Chard is in charge.
Yes I remember that. Point is that historically Engineers were hired at different rates to other soldiers, because that's what they were. But then officers had normally been to public school and were thus educated, even with different emphasis. Gunners likewise as their art was somewhat specialised if not downright dangerous. I used to work in Woolwich Arsenal and passed a massive great Bombard or Petard or some such along the route. Plus I used to pass Woolwich Barracks when it still had the Bloodhounds parked next door and that was my reporting centre for the days call out back in the 80's with the RAR.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
My similar dit is from Denmark in 1981 (Ex Bold Guard, I think).

I dug my Platoon in and sited the GMPG at the the corner of the farmhouse with a good field of fire. The elderly farmer came out and said, ' The Reichswehr put it here in 1944'.

I was 2 yards out.

I should add he and his wife gave me a meal and we shared a bottle of duty free whisky in lieu of 'Scheunegeld'.

Slept well.

For those unfamiliar with Scheunegeld there was an allowance to offer a farmer for use of his yard and barn, eg for Bn HQ. The key phrase in German was 'Wir haben keine Kettenfahrzeuge' (no tracked vehicles) Customarily he could opt for a cash payment or a bottle of whisky. Most went for the latter and many would share it into the small hours.

All good life lessons and good for learning languages. Even though I'd forgotten most of it by dawn.
 
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I should add he and his wife gave me a meal and we shared a bottle of duty free whisky in lieu of 'Scheunegeld'.

Slept well.

For those unfamiliar with Scheunegeld there was an allowance to offer a farmer for use of his yard and barn, eg for Bn HQ. The key phrase in German was 'Wir haben keine Kettenfahrzeuge' (no tracked vehicles) Customarily he could opt for a cash payment or a bottle of whisky. Most went for the latter and many would share it into the small hours.

All good life lessons and good for learning languages. Even though I'd forgotten most of it by dawn.

IIRC all compensation was welcome except for that for asparagus.

Imagine my delight when in 1984 my cnut of an OC ordered the squadron’s compliment of barmine layers across an asparagus field in a demonstration of rapid mine laying, in full view of the CO and the Corps Commander, who were stood in the farmer’s garden.

Just as the farmer and his wife came out to see his merc pebbledashed by the Corps Commander’s Gazelle...

The OC had also ordered my troop to dig in the night before ‘acting as infantry’. It was a foggy night and he sited my troop command trench in the middle of the farmer’s lawn.

I bet he’s still filling in the forms...
 
Funny you should say that :)

I later found out that after the war the Germans rebuilt all the damaged bridges to the exact same design they had used before.
Not just bridges, Dortmund was rebuilt to the pre-war street plan. In fact if you look at the street plan of the inner city and compare it to medieval prints, they are nearly identical
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
IIRC all compensation was welcome except for that for asparagus.

Imagine my delight when in 1984 my cnut of an OC ordered the squadron’s compliment of barmine layers across an asparagus field in a demonstration of rapid mine laying, in full view of the CO and the Corps Commander, who were stood in the farmer’s garden.

Just as the farmer and his wife came out to see his merc pebbledashed by the Corps Commander’s Gazelle...

The OC had also ordered my troop to dig in the night before ‘acting as infantry’. It was a foggy night and he sited my troop command trench in the middle of the farmer’s lawn.

I bet he’s still filling in the forms...

I'm a big fan of Spargel, especially the white stuff with a hollandaise sauce.

Had some last night but it was green and it came from Peru.
 

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