Cold War Photos.

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
I had no idea you were into cross-dressing!

Here's one of my better outfits.

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Summer Ball in Dhekalia. My wife had been posted back to UK and so I had to be dressed by two female doctors. The dress belongs to one of them. Hence the glass beads for the nipples.

A difficult task, but these things have to be done.
 

4(T)

LE
With 100% fatalities, not one uranium POW miner survived the war. conversely only 3% of all Russian POW's went home at wars end.


It should be borne in mind, though, that the Russians were still killing off their prisoners well into the 1950s - so without the fig leaf of wartime stringencies to blame for the fatalities.

It should also be noted that its unknown how many soviet PoWs of the Germans (and civvies) were later offed by their own state - there are millions unaccounted for.
 
Our Company had an LEC driver in Berlin, name of Helmut IIRC. He was sound but claimed to have been Luftwaffe in WW2 and to have been to Coventry in a Stuka so I'm pretty sure he was taking the mickey. He was the go to man for Ostmarks, which he would get from the Zoo Station when out on a task. One day he stitched me up by making a special trip for me. When he got back the CSM asked him where he'd been and he answered "it's Ok, I've just been getting Ostmarks for Sgt retread2". The CSM, despite being on his third tour of Berlin (and who should have known the score, even if it was in contravention of some dull standing order) wanted to charge me which would have been interesting given I needed the Ostmarks to buy concert tickets for my GSO 2. @Whiskybreath might remember the CSM: M**k W*******k. My section boss (RIP Paul) smoothed things over.
The other LEC driver was HJ ("HaYot"), who told a lot of stories about his involvement but I'm fairly sure most were BS ("BullShit"). Good blokes, both of them.
 
The other LEC driver was HJ ("HaYot"), who told a lot of stories about his involvement but I'm fairly sure most were BS ("BullShit"). Good blokes, both of them.
That's right! HJ, which also stands for . . . remember, there are no coincidences vin counter-intelligence.

E2A: do you remember the CSM?
 
No, don't think so. You were there a few years before me. I wasn't, strictly speaking, in a section (I sat in Bob's office, which displeased him initially - he'd been Lord of his Manor since 1945) and acted as SC/team member for 35 when they needed numbers on the ground. Gordon A was CSM during the period.
 
I don't know, but I wouldn't be surprised.
The biggest source of U in the Warsaw Pact was the mines in the Erzgebirge down south, in fact, the place where the element was first discovered. The USSR set up a kind of colonial company to exploit it:


Shipments from it were counted as reparations from the DDR, which was "allowed" (read: voluntold) to buy shares in it gradually.

The German Wikipedia piece doesn't mention any forced labour but rather an absolutely terrifying accident rate and grossly negligent handling of thousands of tonnes of radioactive material (the operation was huge). They recruited by paying top dollar and offering free spirit rations. The company still exists as a federal nationalised industry devoted to cleaning up the mine sites and the surrounding countryside. Contamination was bad enough they had community epidemics of lung cancer.

The mine worked by prisoners may have been on the other slope of the Erzgebirge in Czechoslovakia.
 
You may find it interesting to read up on AcSM Lord. He turned round a POW camp's morale to the degree that German military would salute him.. He has a room named after him at Sandbags and appeared on the 'This is Your Life' BBC programme, donkeys years ago. One of his former Cadets also took part, King Hussain of Jordan.

Many of the Brit POWs had taken part in the 'Todesmarsch' (Death March) as the Germans moved their POWs from east to west before the Soviet Army caught up with them. About -20 degrees and next to no food. Many died. The Soviets commemorated the Todesmarsch and I'll dig out a photo again, bottom right:

View attachment 542101
Those us born in Germany shortly after the war, will remember the difference between Hunger and real hunger. I was always hungry, but never starving. Even at boarding school I'd volunteer to do the scullery work for extras. Rationing still happened. A real treat for me in later years would be Pumpernickel sandwich, with lashings of Butter and a bit of ham. In these wasteful days it's still a crime for me to waste food. I still say to Mrs LR don't give me so much, We can have that tomorrow as well. Granddad (opa) was always in trouble cos he had a habit of giving food to those who needed it. Oma was the one who had to kill the chicken.
 
Those us born in Germany shortly after the war, will remember the difference between Hunger and real hunger. I was always hungry, but never starving. Even at boarding school I'd volunteer to do the scullery work for extras. Rationing still happened. A real treat for me in later years would be Pumpernickel sandwich, with lashings of Butter and a bit of ham. In these wasteful days it's still a crime for me to waste food. I still say to Mrs LR don't give me so much, We can have that tomorrow as well. Granddad (opa) was always in trouble cos he had a habit of giving food to those who needed it. Oma was the one who had to kill the chicken.

There is an excellent book by Ann and John Tusa 'The Berlin Blockade' (1988. ISBN 0-340-41607-6
In the book the parlous state of food supplies in the British Zone of Occupation is discussed. The British administration was having to import food into our zone,from the UK ! the reason given is Russian intransigence and a strict adherence of the Potsdam agreement.

Whilst the American and French zones had problems,they could both cope with feeding the population, most of the Brit zone had been destroyed and, any agriculture was barely surviving. However,part of the PD forbad any 'trade between the occupied zones' so, supplies from one zone couldn't be seen to be going into another.

At the time, GB was supplying enough food to keep most of the German population,on or just above 1200 calories a day, official figures quoted in the book put most of the British population below 1200 per day,for at least 8 months after the end of the war...it also explains why basic food rationing went on for so long in the UK.
 
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There is an excellent book by Ann and John Tusa 'The Berlin Blockade' (1988. ISBN 0-340-41607-6
In the book the parlous state of food supplies in the British Zone of Occupation is discussed. The British administration was having to import food into our zone,from the UK ! the reason given is Russian intransigence and a strict adherence of the Potsdam agreement.

Whilst the American and French zones had problems,they could both cope with feeding the population, most of the Brit zone had been destroyed and, any agriculture was barely surviving. However,part of the PD forbad any 'trade between the occupied zones' so, supplies from one zone couldn't be seen to be going into another.

At the time, GB was supplying enough food to keep most of the German population,on or just above 1200 calories a day, official figures quoted in the book put most of the British population below 1200 per day,for at least 8 months after the end of the war...it also explains why basic food rationing went on for so long in the UK.
That bit About trade between OZ was applied specifically by it’s abscence. It simply couldn’t have been enforced. Dad was in 16 veh btn post 48, they were partly involved in the Wolfsburg distribution set up as well as vehicle reallocation to reparations. It also meant that home grown food had to be moved seasonally between OZs . Around Oldenburg dad was at pains to point out in later years the farmers had resorted to horse ploughing. But the utter devastation meant that West Germany had to become more efficient in farming in short order. In fact in returning to Oldenburg in 65, the farmers were seen as fat and well heeled.
 
It should be borne in mind, though, that the Russians were still killing off their prisoners well into the 1950s - so without the fig leaf of wartime stringencies to blame for the fatalities.

It should also be noted that its unknown how many soviet PoWs of the Germans (and civvies) were later offed by their own state - there are millions unaccounted for.
About 1967, on excercise in germany, an evening off to go in to the village, a german chap and his wife picked up all 4 of us and dropped us off at our location. He told us he had been a prisoner of war in Russia until 1956, and now he was a house decorator (No, it was not 'Him'.)
 
About 1967, on excercise in germany, an evening off to go in to the village, a german chap and his wife picked up all 4 of us and dropped us off at our location. He told us he had been a prisoner of war in Russia until 1956, and now he was a house decorator (No, it was not 'Him'.)
In the book Panzer Commander Colonel Hans von Luck describes his life as a prisoner of the Russians, he was released in 1949 so one of the early ones. Having had a good war (for a German) Poland, Europe, Russia, North Africa, the Normandy invasion (he made the AA gunners turn their 88s into direct fire weapons and minced our Armour near Caen) and then unfortunately for him he was sent back to Russia where he was caught.
He returned only to find his wife had remarried, she had thought him dead and he had nothing.
 
That bit About trade between OZ was applied specifically by it’s abscence. It simply couldn’t have been enforced. Dad was in 16 veh btn post 48, they were partly involved in the Wolfsburg distribution set up as well as vehicle reallocation to reparations. It also meant that home grown food had to be moved seasonally between OZs . Around Oldenburg dad was at pains to point out in later years the farmers had resorted to horse ploughing. But the utter devastation meant that West Germany had to become more efficient in farming in short order. In fact in returning to Oldenburg in 65, the farmers were seen as fat and well heeled.
It refers to the first few years after the war and, one of Soxmis duties was to police the PD in the Zones of Occupation...by 1955 it didn't matter rationing had finished in the UK.
 

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