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Cold War Photos.

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
From memory effective fighting strength of the allied brigades? Against a NBA Div

As I've already said, perhaps 3 days and then grown ups decide to press the nuclear button or not. That particular problem has gone away to be replaced by other ones. The Soviet officers I had the privilege of meeting were generally good and intelligent people. That was a most useful life lesson.

And one I employ at Sandbags every day in conversation.
 

We reorganised the obstacle plan during my time there. One particular bridge on the Ring was identified to be the likely point of maximum effort for Orange Forces and we changed the way that we would demolish it.

I felt quite smug when their op plans were found... :)
 
Our briefing (79 - 80) was that it would be left to GKM (Border Command Centre) to re-unite the capital. They certainly had the kit and bodies. The NVA were to help with the WP drive west.

Re: brigades, in addition RAF Gatow had a 'shadow structure' of a couple of battalions (stop laughing) and the German civpol also had a military role.

But as I have said previously, things change, in this case on both sides.

I remember seeing the BCP training in Ruhleben with their wheeled APC and Pamzerfaust...
 
Actually rations, blankets & clothing.
There was still snow up in them thar hills at the time and it was feckin perishing on the ground.
ETA: At the start of the Op, that is.

I know that mate. I had a friend who was on Op Haven, I went a few years later on Op Warden.

Turkey's weather was a bit shit in Feb, but Zakho was bloody freezing
 
As I've already said, perhaps 3 days and then grown ups decide to press the nuclear button or not.
That's an interesting comment TBF. Back in 69, I do not recall, personally, that Russia and China were having a hottish war, but it seems they were, to the extent that the Sovs were contemplating nukes against Beijing. ( curtesy Utube historical refs on the cold war) It would seem that Nixon told Kruschev that if they did that the US would intervene and the latter backed down. Now from personal memory when the USSR went into Cz in 68 the buzz was that the Soviets were going to start, but by by 69 it started fizzling out. I don't think anyone in our unit had a clue as to why, but it becomes evident, that within that time frame there was every possibility that Russia would be fighting on two fronts. But either way the Sovs were screwed. China had proved the useful enemy.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
That's an interesting comment TBF. Back in 69, I do not recall, personally, that Russia and China were having a hottish war, but it seems they were, to the extent that the Sovs were contemplating nukes against Beijing. ( curtesy Utube historical refs on the cold war) It would seem that Nixon told Kruschev that if they did that the US would intervene and the latter backed down. Now from personal memory when the USSR went into Cz in 68 the buzz was that the Soviets were going to start, but by by 69 it started fizzling out. I don't think anyone in our unit had a clue as to why, but it becomes evident, that within that time frame there was every possibility that Russia would be fighting on two fronts. But either way the Sovs were screwed. China had proved the useful enemy.

It's a bit of an eye opener as a young Capt to learn that even in the chillier bits of the Cold War very senior officers from both sides would meet up for a meal and a chin wag in a restaurant next to a windmill just outside Potsdam and put the world to rights over a plate of food and a few toasts with vodka. Just a matter of establishing a workable level of mutual trust.
 
It's a bit of an eye opener as a young Capt to learn that even in the chillier bits of the Cold War very senior officers from both sides would meet up for a meal and a chin wag in a restaurant next to a windmill just outside Potsdam and put the world to rights over a plate of food and a few toasts with vodka. Just a matter of establishing a workable level of mutual trust.
Otherwise known as “informal levels of contact.” Nothing new there, except when one realises it’s happening. It also serves another function-in that both sides can gauge what either side knows.
 
It's a bit of an eye opener as a young Capt to learn that even in the chillier bits of the Cold War very senior officers from both sides would meet up for a meal and a chin wag in a restaurant next to a windmill just outside Potsdam and put the world to rights over a plate of food and a few toasts with vodka. Just a matter of establishing a workable level of mutual trust.

Establishing such a workable level of mutual trust that it changed the face of the Cold War?

They would've still attacked the same if ordered to do so, despite the mutual trust.

We would've still defended the same, despite the mutual trust.

I doubt that 'trust' was worth a cup of cold piss.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Establishing such a workable level of mutual trust that it changed the face of the Cold War?

They would've still attacked the same if ordered to do so, despite the mutual trust.

We would've still defended the same, despite the mutual trust.

I doubt that 'trust' was worth a cup of cold piss.

If you say so.

What's your experience in this field?
 

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