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Cold War Photos.

Touch a tree in Germany and the cursed Forst meisters came down on you like a ton of bricks. I went off area on one of the smaller 3 Div training areas (Musheda(!)) near Soest, and destroyed a few piles of cut timber with my gaggle of APCs, it cost quite a lot in compensation.
Now as an aside didn't the tree on the BATUS training area get bolted together on a regular basis as it was one of the few landmarks

A mate who was in Berlin in the 80s told me a dit about a convoy of FV432s travelling to a training area somewhere.
He was a Colour & wasn’t taking part. He was back at barracks doing some paperwork when the office phone rang & he was told;

Cpl: You better come down to xxx Straße, there’s been a bit of an accident.

Mate: Can’t you sort it? I’m busy.

Cpl: Not really. I think you’d better come down.

Mate sighs, finishes his brew, jumps into a Rover and heads in the direction of the training area.
After a while he comes across the convoy all stopped & near a partly demolished wall. “He could’ve bloody sorted this!” he thinks.

Then he got another 50yds down & a 432 is buried in someone’s front room.
He’d skidded on the cobbled road on a bend, through the drive & thought he’d pop in to watch a bit of Coronation Straße with the box head owner.

Me: What did you do?

Mate: What any self respecting Sgt would do in this situation. I phoned the barracks & told someone with pips to come & sort it. It’s above my pay grade & I went back to my brew.
 
What is this flag the troops are raising at the beginning of the sequence? It looks like a (West) German flag but there seems to be some sort of design in the center. Surely not an East German flag? :?

German Flag.JPG
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Most of the trees on BATUS were Polus Telegraphicus. They fruited year round producing a single large cylindrical fruit that looked very much like a 45 gallon oil drum. The trunks were notable for their straightness and uniform diameter which oozed creosote / bitumen. There was some variety in the fruit colouring with some patterns resembling numbers.

They were indeed all marked on the maps but in my experience the map position was usually wrong, sometimes by many kilometres. I say this with some certainty as we all left RMAS with exceptional abilities to reference map to ground and vice versa.

There were also various concentric tracks called 5 Mile circle or some such that I‘m told resulted from an underground detonation of a massive charge of HE as an experiment in nuclear sized detonations without the inconvenience of rendering the area contaminated for 10,000 years.

Anyone confirm this?
DRE Suffield:


The circles were for the blast effects of the big (conventional) bangs there. Large areas are contaminated with mainly blister agents I think (ask 1 BW).
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
MEDMAN 7 1982....
The ones I knew finished up as a Brigadier EF (quite outspoken if I remember about Telic) and a half colonel MS. Both I think were A squadron when we were doing the Soltau and Sennelager gigs in 1979.
I remember that the MTO croaked halfway through the pre-BATUS training!

Tony E2 was the OC HQ Sqn.
Can’t remember which Med Man it was, seemed as if I went at least once a year up until 86 or87 when I went out as safety staff for four on the trot.

It was Nigel A-F he and I were Sqn Ldrs together in Hemer, and yes he was outspoke which is probably why he left as a Brigadier, MS took over from me on amalgamation in Fally and went on to be a disaster planner in Australia, think he was involved in the bush fires recently.

Fortunately the MTO survived and had a triple bypass, he returned to full time duty and finished his time, sadly he died about 10 years ago, as far as I know nothing to do with his heart.

I was not as outspoken nor was I one of the chosen blue eyed boys, left after my Sqn Ldrs tour, retired early as Mrs 06 was still serving, have no heart problems and the only fires I have to worry about are bonfires and lighting a wood burner of an evening.
 
Delete your post, and wash your mouth out. As any number of the Armoured Farmers will say curtly, that is the flag of 3 RTR!!
I thought that might have been the explanation. I asked a grizzled chum who had served in the 6th RTR and he sniffed. Oh, THAT lot.
 
Can’t remember which Med Man it was, seemed as if I went at least once a year up until 86 or87 when I went out as safety staff for four on the trot.

It was Nigel A-F he and I were Sqn Ldrs together in Hemer, and yes he was outspoke which is probably why he left as a Brigadier, MS took over from me on amalgamation in Fally and went on to be a disaster planner in Australia, think he was involved in the bush fires recently.

Fortunately the MTO survived and had a triple bypass, he returned to full time duty and finished his time, sadly he died about 10 years ago, as far as I know nothing to do with his heart.

I was not as outspoken nor was I one of the chosen blue eyed boys, left after my Sqn Ldrs tour, retired early as Mrs 06 was still serving, have no heart problems and the only fires I have to worry about are bonfires and lighting a wood burner of an evening.
Very good, thanks for the update on Nigel and Mike. Nigel if I am correct was a University officer so could use words well, Mike was a Generals son so had a degree of presence along with his mop of 'burnishes copper' hair!
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Most of the trees on BATUS were Polus Telegraphicus. They fruited year round producing a single large cylindrical fruit that looked very much like a 45 gallon oil drum. The trunks were notable for their straightness and uniform diameter which oozed creosote / bitumen. There was some variety in the fruit colouring with some patterns resembling numbers.

They were indeed all marked on the maps but in my experience the map position was usually wrong, sometimes by many kilometres. I say this with some certainty as we all left RMAS with exceptional abilities to reference map to ground and vice versa.

There were also various concentric tracks called 5 Mile circle or some such that I‘m told resulted from an underground detonation of a massive charge of HE as an experiment in nuclear sized detonations without the inconvenience of rendering the area contaminated for 10,000 years.

Anyone confirm this?

I'd always understood there'd once been an actual nuclear test at BATUS. Every day...
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Can’t remember which Med Man it was, seemed as if I went at least once a year up until 86 or87 when I went out as safety staff for four on the trot.

It was Nigel A-F he and I were Sqn Ldrs together in Hemer, and yes he was outspoke which is probably why he left as a Brigadier, MS took over from me on amalgamation in Fally and went on to be a disaster planner in Australia, think he was involved in the bush fires recently.

Fortunately the MTO survived and had a triple bypass, he returned to full time duty and finished his time, sadly he died about 10 years ago, as far as I know nothing to do with his heart.

I was not as outspoken nor was I one of the chosen blue eyed boys, left after my Sqn Ldrs tour, retired early as Mrs 06 was still serving, have no heart problems and the only fires I have to worry about are bonfires and lighting a wood burner of an evening.
I remember the MTO keeling over and the CO calling me in to say that in addition to commanding my IRG troop of RCT Stollies I was now the BG MTO too. I felt quite chuffed as I was only a 2nd tour subbie - wasn't quite so chuffed when I saw the pile of shite vehicles I had to take over in 2 feet of snow in Crowfoot!
 
I remember the MTO keeling over and the CO calling me in to say that in addition to commanding my IRG troop of RCT Stollies I was now the BG MTO too. I felt quite chuffed as I was only a 2nd tour subbie - wasn't quite so chuffed when I saw the pile of shite vehicles I had to take over in 2 feet of snow in Crowfoot!
The joys of being the last BG of the year, nursing wrecks through the exercise as they are going to be refurbished over the winter so no you can’t have a replacement just keep it going.
 

ste14w

War Hero
Question for heavy armour types - specifically MBTs. They're obviously tremendously powerful, heavy things that can drive through obstacles etc. If you're doing this on scheme, and a tree branch rips the lights off, or smashes the tool bins, or optics or whatever, how much drama did this create?

If you did that with a B Veh and a tree reconfigured your Rover or Bedford, at least in my Corps, you'd have to fill out an FMT3 and that generally meant tapping the boards. Even if the OC dismissed the charge, it's still a ball ache.

I can't imagine hordes of tank drivers and commanders filling out an entire pad of FMT3s after an exercise.

Or were A vehicles no different to B vehicles in that respect
It wasn't really an issue. The first one was a freebie.
Anything after that normally cost a Yellow Handbag.
Really serious damage just meant you got a good kicking.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
The joys of being the last BG of the year, nursing wrecks through the exercise as they are going to be refurbished over the winter so no you can’t have a replacement just keep it going.
Luckily I had a bloody good troop (we wouldn't normally have supported a BG as we were Arty Sp but the usual blokes were in NI) and it was a good exercise.

My one and only time in Canada although I narrowly avoided a 2 year tour as BG DCOS back in 1997!
 
Lippstadt 1981

Various 'tanks'

image0.jpeg
image1.jpeg
image2.jpeg
image3.jpeg
 

ste14w

War Hero
Follow up question, if I may. In an “A” veh, again particularly an MBT, who‘s responsible for the driving conduct? The driver, who’s operating the controls, but has a limited view, or the commander who is directing the driver, with a better view? I can’t see how a driver would be responsible for reversing into something he can’t see.
Reversing is definitely down to the commander.
However , Hussars are probably the best trained and most professional drivers on the planet, so rarely needed to be reprimanded for anything.
At all.
Ever.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
BATUS IRG trucks back then were mixture of Canadian 'deuce and a half' and tired MKs:

1605892572101.png


This vehicle is apparently still around (at 70 odd years old), it was half that age in this photo. The Stolly was a sexy truck but could only carry 5 tons - this carried even less...
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Call out for the RAC? ;-) :cool:

Heavy Recovery.jpeg
 
BATUS IRG trucks back then were mixture of Canadian 'deuce and a half' and tired MKs:

View attachment 522107

This vehicle is apparently still around (at 70 odd years old), it was half that age in this photo. The Stolly was a sexy truck but could only carry 5 tons - this carried even less...
Wow! I've never seen an Early M211 except in museums. That's the badger with the GMC gas 6 cylinder and Hydromatic auto transmission, right? We busted those up years ago and replaced them with the M35 series.
 

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