Cold War Photos.

Soviet troops lived in 'Dry' Barracks and, couldn't go out unaccompanied...the Sov Army had to change the recipe for issue boot polish...they were distilling that as well !
My wife's second cousin, Dirk, was a NVA conscript in the 80's. When he took over his tubular steel bed frame, he discovered he was occupying the company still. The older conscripts let him off a lot of the stuff the others suffered, because of this involuntary secondary duty.
 
My wife's second cousin, Dirk, was a NVA conscript in the 80's. When he took over his tubular steel bed frame, he discovered he was occupying the company still. The older conscripts let him off a lot of the stuff the others suffered, because of this involuntary secondary duty.
The NVA were allowed much more freedom and, you could often see them hitchhiking during the summer,going home for weekends and leave.
 
Out of curiosity, and a gen question, how did the Sovs view a 'posting' to GSFG based on those conditions - or did the conscripts not know what it was like until they arrived? Having never eyeballed them until after the end of the Cold War (saw their Airborne types out in Croatia whilst on UN duty - wasn't overly impressed).
TBH, a lot of the conscripts didn't know where they were going, until they arrived.

A lot came from the autonomous regions of the Soviet Union and, struggled with the Russian language,let alone European geography.

There was always a 'sweet period' after the Troop rotation when, 'new driver' training columns were out all over the DDR. and, the trainees didn't recognise the cars until we were past !

It was rich pickings for the AMLM's because, all the different units within a specific area,who required their drivers to be trained on 'B' vehicles, would send the trainee and, the type of vehicle he would be driving.

This would allow us to photograph specific kinds of vehicles from units we couldn't get to normally and, also get the VRN's pertaining to that unit, which would allow us to track units and their vehicles if and, when they deployed into the field.

Routinely, these columns would be up to a kilometre long, which meant a lot of work for the Tour Officer (Camera) and, the Tour NCO (Calling the vehicles 'of interest')...
 
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The lad standing up, mag on the SMG, why?


Well, obvious really: we could be expecting Iwan at any moment and we were tasked to build a minefield, so a minefield we shall build. We're Royal Engineers, for Pete's sake! We can't be distracted by a Shock Army or two: the lance-jack was our final line of defence.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Adjt Chef Phillips Mariotti, Halle-Neustadt, Feb 1984.
Major Arthur Nicholson, Ludwiglust, Mar 1985.
 
A State authorised killing?
Murder !!! Tried on a British Tour in September1976.

The crew were sitting by the side of a road, nowhere near anything 'sensitive',having a coffee break. An NVA Ural 375 coming down the road towards them, came across the road and drove straight towards them. It climbed the right hand side of the bonnet,up onto the roof and toppled sideways to the left. The Tour NCO sitting in the FRH seat suffered multiple fractures to his femur and was knocked unconcious, the RAF driver suffered cuts and contusions,as well as having the autobox T bar lever end, forced between 2 of his ribs, the Tour Officer went into shock.

It was eventually reported to Potsdam, the Standby Crew picked up the recovery trailer from the Mission House and, arrived at the scene 3 hours later. The East German driver had been 'spirited away' and, the NVA VRN plates had been removed from the Ural. Eventually,the Tour NCO was taken to the nearest hospital, with the Recovery Crew Tour Offr. in attendance. At no time did the Sov/EG/VoPos render any assistance to the recovery crew whilst trying to get the car onto the recovery trailer. The recovery vehicle,trailer and car. recovered to Berlin. The following day, the East German Surgeon pinned the fractures on the Tour NCO, with a Mission officer in attendance and, eventually he was taken back to BMH Berlin.

All the crew members recovered,the Tour Officer and, Driver eventually resumed touring duties...

Footnote. The Int Corps Tour NCO, had to have the 'pinning' redone in the UK, after it was found they had used pins made of ferrous metal and, they were rusting in his leg.

After reunification, it was found the the MfS had, a 'Blood List', a sliding scale of injuries inflicted and the monetary reward for the severity of the inflicted injury,,,fatality being the bottom line.

If it had not been for the strength of the body on the Opel Admiral, there would have been a fatality.

Of interest to all you military vehicle buffs...the last thing the Tour NCO remebers was the oil sump plug bolt underneath the Ural engine...it's square. ;-)

Just to bang the drum a bit more...a request was made to the MOD/Medals Committee, for a Bar to the GSM to be issued to all Brixmis personnel who had served in the Mission during the 44 years of it's existence (actually not that many) !

The application was backed by a Who's Who of Generals past and present and, Top ranking blue jobs as well !

It was rejected twice,even after a well written presentation folder containing,chapter and verse what we did,with all the gory photos. The reason given by the Chairman of the Committee was "There was insufficient 'Risk and Rigour' involved in our operational duties" !

2 months later, the same committee (on the recommendation of the chairman) awarded the crew of HMS Daring (a Type 45,Guided Missile Destroyer) a medal, for stooging around the mouth of the Red Sea for 5 weeks on protection duties,because "They operated under constant threat from pirates and, shore based missile boats",who were operating within 180 nautical miles of the ship" !

The Chairman was one (now) AVM Garry Tunnicliffe RAF (with a few seat-shining medals after his name), who joined the RAF just over 18 months before the Mission disbanded on reunification...not one of my favourite people !

Sorry...Rant over ! :rolleyes:
 
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Murder !!! Tried on a British Tour in September1976.

The crew were sitting by the side of a road, nowhere near anything 'sensitive',having a coffee break. An NVA Ural 375 coming down the road towards them, came across the road and drove straight towards them. It climbed the right hand side of the bonnet,up onto the roof and toppled sideways to the left. The Tour NCO sitting in the FRH seat suffered multiple fractures to his femur and was knocked unconcious, the RAF driver suffered cuts and contusions,as well as having the autobox T bar lever end, forced between 2 of his ribs, the Tour Officer went into shock.

It was eventually reported to Potsdam, the Standby Crew picked up the recovery trailer from the Mission House and, arrived at the scene 3 hours later. The East German driver had been 'spirited away' and, the NVA VRN plates had been removed from the Ural. Eventually,the Tour NCO was taken to the nearest hospital, with the Recovery Crew Tour Offr. in attendance. At no time did the Sov/EG/VoPos render any assistance to the recovery crew whilst trying to get the car onto the recovery trailer. The recovery vehicle,trailer and car. recovered to Berlin. The following day, the East German Surgeon pinned the fractures on the Tour NCO, with a Mission officer in attendance and, eventually he was taken back to BMH Berlin.

All the crew members recovered,the Tour Officer and, Driver eventually resumed touring duties...

Footnote. The Int Corps Tour NCO, had to have the 'pinning' redone in the UK, after it was found they had used pins made of ferrous metal and, they were rusting in his leg.

After reunification, it was found the the MfS had, a 'Blood List', a sliding scale of injuries inflicted and the monetary reward for the severity of the inflicted injury,,,fatality being the bottom line.

If it had not been for the strength of the body on the Opel Admiral, there would have been a fatality.

Of interest to all you military vehicle buffs...the last thing the Tour NCO remebers was the oil sump plug bolt underneath the Ural engine...it's square. ;-)

Just to bang the drum a bit more...a request was made to the MOD/Medals Committee, for a Bar to the GSM to be issued to all Brixmis personnel who had served in the Mission during the 44 years of it's existence (actually not that many) !

The application was backed by a Who's Who of Generals past and present and, Top ranking blue jobs as well !

It was rejected twice,even after a well written presentaion folder containing,chapter and verse what we did,with all the gory photos. The reason given by the Chairman of the Committee was "There was insufficient 'Risk and Rigour' involved in our operational duties" !

2 months later, the same committee (on the recommendation of the chairman) awarded the crew of HMS Daring (a Type 45,Guided Missile Destroyer) a medal, for stooging around the mouth of the Red Sea for 5 weeks on protection duties,because "They operated under constant threat from pirates and, shore based missile boats",who were operating within 180 nautical miles of the ship" !

The Chairman was one (now) AVM Garry Tunnicliffe RAF (with a few seat-shining medals after his name), who joined the RAF just over 18 months before the Mission disbanded on reunification...not one of my favourite people !

Sorry...Rant over ! :rolleyes:

Sounds like those grisly meetings of flesh and heavy metal which went with big exercises, albeit malice aforethought by those chaps who's turf you were on.
 
Murder !!! Tried on a British Tour in September1976.

**SNIP**

Sorry...Rant over ! :rolleyes:
Similar incident in 1982 at Athenstedt radar station on the edge of the east Harz.

A Tatra 148 drove out of the installation straight into the side of Brixmis car 1, the CO's personal mount. Brig Learmont was actually in the vehicle during the incident.

The MfS reported the crash as an "accident", but it does seem odd that 2 further vehicles followed the Tatra out of the installation, taking up positions to block the Brixmis vehicle!

Looks almost like a rehearsal for the incident in Halle 2 years later - the murder of Adjutant-Chef Mariotti.

A justified rant @RoofRat!
 
My take is that the officers loved it. They were envious of the wealth of the East Germans compared to home. The soldiery were very tightly controlled and hardly ever got out. AWOL and suicides were not uncommon.

The young girl who acted as an interpreter for me (Russian into German) on one of my better detentions had to apply for travel papers weeks in advance to go to Dresden from Karl Marx Stadt.
Was this the detention to which you are referring?

gb_cw_brixmis_detention_0001.jpg
 

DarkBrig

War Hero
Arrived in Dortmund as a lance jack MP in Jul 85, literally as I was being shown how to use a 100 DM note as a buffer between paying for drinks and the cost not being worth giving out change (yes Booze was that cheap, for two months it was not worth the barmans while to walk two feet to the till and give me change I just got a lot of "**** off with that" and told to jog on) the active edge alarm went off, cue mass exodius and multiple TAs minutes later. Them were the days.
As an addendunm: Al Piercey never forget you and your Missus are thieves for watering down the bottles before I took over the bar in APR 86, you Cun* . I hope you both die a painful death.
 
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