CO2 Shortage are you serious

#22
I thought that due to poor quality most of those pots ended up in The Channel,but the collection was seen as morale boosting?
Excellent all the pikies will now be scouring the channel for them.
 
#24
Similar was the removal of all those beautiful Victorian iron railings for the war effort. Sat around in huge piles rotting as there was no shortage during the war. Good for morale but appalling vandalism.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#26
Trees help by removing (sequestering) CO2 from the atmosphere during photosynthesis to form carbohydrates that are used in plant structure/function and return oxygen back into the atmosphere as a byproduct. Roughly half of the greenhouse effect is caused by CO2.

So cut down all trees. Bastid trees stealing the CO2 from our beer.
 

Maalox

On ROPS
On ROPs
#27
CO2 is currently only 0.04% (4 parts per 10,000!) of the atmosphere.

It used to be 0.5% (5 parts per 1,000), hence the giant flaura, fauna & dinosaurs that used to be.

CO2 is a gaseous fertilizer on which the food-chain of all life depends.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#30
It also has lead to the absurd situation where whole vessels of scrap are shipped off to places like India to be dealt with. What's wrong with putting it in a smelter here? We literally give away materials of significant worth.
Places like India and China don't worry about trivialities like health and safety.

Bloke I worked with once went to China and watched them doing lead casting with the workers devoid off all safety gear including dust marks. (Lead dust is pretty toxic). Turned out that if the plant manager spend on safety gear (and a few other things like decent washing facilities) he couldn't get the goods out at the cost he'd been ordered to.

Labour's cheap over there. Kill a few off - there's plenty more who'll want the job.

Wordsmith
 
#31
Thing is we have the technology and know how in this country to do it, we just lack the political and businness get up and go to do so.
 
#33
Similar was the removal of all those beautiful Victorian iron railings for the war effort. Sat around in huge piles rotting as there was no shortage during the war. Good for morale but appalling vandalism.
It was the wrought iron park and garden railings that were, allegedly, dumped at sea after the war, possibly due to their having dozens of layers of red lead-oxide paint. The aluminium was, and is, valuable as scrap and most of it probably did end up in aircraft.

Wrought iron was nearly pure iron and was made by hammering white hot puddled/cast/pig iron, causing the excess carbon and slag to break off; they literally beat the shit out of it. The 'wrought iron' sold now is all mild steel. The last UK manufacturer of wrought iron packed up in the early 1970s I believe and a lot of blacksmiths making decorative wrought ironwork packed in the trade at that time.

PS Partialy wrong, wrought iron is available again.
 
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FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#34
#35
ARRSE produces plenty of methane, can CO2 be extracted from that?
Hot air more than methane! But rotting sewage or other stuff does, and burning methane (a really bad greenhouse gas) turns it into Carbon Dioxide, so it could be produced, and in an eco friendly war. I wonder if it could be easily extracted from the smoke of industrial furnaces and the like?

You'd think that with the amount of hot air generated by this website alone... :-D

One of the issues is possibly the waste laws. Remember when we used to donate pots and pans to make Spitfires, etc.? Scrap was seen as a strategic resource. Then it was realigned under waste management rules.

The scrappies went wild. Okay, you rarely see a poor one - a 'poor' year is one in which he didn't buy a new Jag - but they did have a point. It meant that there were often unreasonable costs loaded onto them. For instance, by the time what's left of a car goes to landfill, there's nothing of intrinsic value left on it - the scrappies will have had it all off. But they were being made to pay the full whack for landfilling 'waste'.

It also has lead to the absurd situation where whole vessels of scrap are shipped off to places like India to be dealt with. What's wrong with putting it in a smelter here? We literally give away materials of significant worth.
Errm... you are aware, I hope, that the donated pots and pans and railings and stuff were not used to produce aircraft? Metal not good enough. Good forgetting the public to feel part of the war effort though, but the Government did wonder what to do with it all?

Are you also aware that cars are stripped of anything of value, then turned into metal fragments, loaded into the hold of a bulk carrier, and exported to the People's Republic of China?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#36
Apparently:

Directly converting CO<sub>2</sub> into a gasoline fuel

I not sure how much of this is "works in lab only" and how far away it is from being "engineering"
As far as I can tell, the technology seems to be about reverse-engineering CO2 and adding hydrogen in some form to make it a hydrocarbon again, which seems an odd thing to do and can't be very energy efficient. It's akin to the old joke that cornflakes can be very nutritious if sprinkled on food.
 
#37
As far as I can tell, the technology seems to be about reverse-engineering CO2 and adding hydrogen in some form to make it a hydrocarbon again, which seems an odd thing to do and can't be very energy efficient. It's akin to the old joke that cornflakes can be very nutritious if sprinkled on food.
Well it's going to turn on how catalytic the catalyst is, how many joules need to go in to get a joule out, and how it compares financially to planting fast growing trees/bushes and burning the wood...
 
#38
The aluminium was, and is, valuable as scrap and most of it probably did end up in aircraft.
Im sure it was the wrong quality and would be difficult / expensive and time consuming to create the correct grade . As supplies weren't impinged on as feared I wouldn't be surprised if it was just stored.

Post war Iron was in short supply but there was lots of Aluminium kicking around the UK which is why Landies were aluminium bodied

In light of this I suspect everyones favourite sauce pan finished up either as landrovers or mess tins
 
#39
CO2 is currently only 0.04% (4 parts per 10,000!) of the atmosphere.

It used to be 0.5% (5 parts per 1,000), hence the giant flaura, fauna & dinosaurs that used to be.

CO2 is a gaseous fertilizer on which the food-chain of all life depends.
Typical
Maalox for the 1st time ever actually contributes a sensible and valid point

On a thread that doesn't want either
 
#40
You see your assuming cause and effect
To whit - Pirate numbers down results in temperature up

It could easily be the other way round and that rising temperatures melting ice caps mean the waters now too deep for the Pirates boats to float in
Obviously you are not a Pastafarian.
 

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