CMT Uni training

#1
What's the reason for Uni course for Paramedicine???. Looks like they are going down the same route as nursing did 15 years ago, and look at the state of nursing now!!!!!!!. It will all end in tears a tell ya.

CTC
 
#5
Im sure I read on the either ucas or one of the uni websites if you're already in the ambulance service and/or have medical experience you only have to do one year at uni. Ive looked at the course and its two years for foundation but you need 3000 hours to get your pin number, if you dont get the hours then you have to do the third year to get them, but if you do you can do the third year to get the full degree. Im really torn between the ambulance serivce and the army, and its looks like i have a similar wait to do either!
 
#6
Fudz said:
Im sure I read on the either ucas or one of the uni websites if you're already in the ambulance service and/or have medical experience you only have to do one year at uni. Ive looked at the course and its two years for foundation but you need 3000 hours to get your pin number, if you dont get the hours then you have to do the third year to get them, but if you do you can do the third year to get the full degree. Im really torn between the ambulance serivce and the army, and its looks like i have a similar wait to do either!
Why not go to uni to do the paramedic degree and join the TA as a CMT as well? Then in three years time you have qualifications to offer both the regular army and the ambulance service!!

(And between you and me, even if Afghan is closed, I'm sure that the gubmint will find somewhere else to go :D )

Btw, have a look at the 'CMT(V) What's it all about' thread in the Professionally Qualified forum. I'd do a linky thing but I'm a computer biff.
 
#7
chokinthechicken said:
What's the reason for Uni course for Paramedicine???. Looks like they are going down the same route as nursing did 15 years ago, and look at the state of nursing now!!!!!!!. It will all end in tears a tell ya.

CTC
Nursing is in the state it is in thanks to the 'traditionally trained' wasters who bend over and let failed baked bean stackers bugger the profession yet again ...

Nursing is in the state it is in thanks to Bliar spin ...

Nursing is in the state it is in becasue of the people who have left, committed suicide or are on long term sick becasue of the above muppetry ...

higer education preparation for practice is essential to good healthcare ...
 
#8
Split from a recruitment topic and moved here for you to discuss.

Ventress and flash, if its a load of rubbish, then apologies feel free to remove.

:)
 
#9
How many places do the army actually have for CMT's to go and do the paramedic training? From what i have seen anyone wanting to go for it has to jump through a whole lot of hoops and even then the courses have been screwed around.
 
#11
Karabiner said:
contract being sorted, again!!!!!!!!

route to paramedic in the Army can be amb tech followed by 30 week foundation degree. lots still to do and I am working with an esteemed (if not rather ugly :) ) colleague on a tri-service prposal to resolve the many issues we are currently facing with paramedic
I may know him...
 
#15
Mrs Trotsky is in the LAS and came up to paramedic the hard way in the days when they wore court shoes to rail crashes.

She doesn't rate Uni training as she feels its to academic and not enough time spent on the road.

The last Mrs Trotsky was a mature student at City uni reading Nursing. she spent much of her life in sociology lectures (i even helped her write an essay on stop and search by taking her to soho and pointing out who i would stop and why) she felt she was not being adequaltley prepared for practice.

The point I am making is that too much of an academic approach is not always the best way of doing things... sometimes training is more appropriate than teaching.

Trotsky
 
#16
chokinthechicken said:
I'm sure your doing your best Karabiner. You can teach all you like in a classroom, but hands-on experience can't be beaten. IMHO

CTC
You are right, but most service personnel that I know that have qualified as paramedics have had extensive practical healthcare portfolios. I don't envisage newly qualified Cbt Med Techs or Med Assts Class 1 progressing straight onto a Paramedic Foundation Degree programme. I think it more likely that they get a couple of year's experience, including an ops tour under their belts before applying to be considered for selection to the programme.

The trick once qualified, will be for the DMS to provide the clinical placements for Paramedics to maintain and develop clinical currency and experience. This is where the JMC needs to get engaged and finesse placements with acute care and ambulance providers.
 
#17
mph1977 said:
higer education preparation for practice is essential to good healthcare ...
Then why do patients lie in excrement on NHS wards with 3 "nurses" on duty when under the old apprenticeship style SRN/SEN system bed sores were eradicated, malnutrition dealt with and nobody was too proud to wipe arrses?

Nowadays everyone is a "staff nurse" and it is all about "management". My father went into a coma on a ward full of degree qualified nurses because nobody paid any attention to the patients as they were too busy "managing" the ward instead of nursing whilst my mother, who was an retired SEN, had to phone me to drive 300 miles to meet with the hospital "management" before anyone admitted that he wasn't just faking sleep when my mother visited as the staff claimed.

Nursing does not require a degree, nursing require discipline and common sense.

If nursing requires a degree then a commercial pilot requires the power of levitation.
 
#18
Trotsky said:
Mrs Trotsky is in the LAS and came up to paramedic the hard way in the days when they wore court shoes to rail crashes.

She doesn't rate Uni training as she feels its to academic and not enough time spent on the road.

The last Mrs Trotsky was a mature student at City uni reading Nursing. she spent much of her life in sociology lectures (i even helped her write an essay on stop and search by taking her to soho and pointing out who i would stop and why) she felt she was not being adequaltley prepared for practice.

The point I am making is that too much of an academic approach is not always the best way of doing things... sometimes training is more appropriate than teaching.

Trotsky
I am going through 'the traditional route' with the LAS like your misses, although it is probably slightly different to when she did it.

You are wrong in assuming the university student paramedics lack hands on experience. They have clinical placements the same as we do and spend half of their second year on the road. When they are on the road they seem to be allowed to do much more than those of us going through the inservice route. One of the guys from my intake worked on a training crew with a 2nd year university student paramedic and a qualified paramedic. The Uni student was allowed to cannulate whereas we as LAS student paramedics will not get to do that until right at the end of our paramedic training. The main issue with the university students that I have heard voiced is their age and lack of life experience. They are qualified by the age of 21/22 whereas in the past you could not join most ambulance services until you were 21 (18 for LAS). The average age for those starting the inservice training as a student paramedic seems to be around 30.
 
#19
Furryturd said:
mph1977 said:
higer education preparation for practice is essential to good healthcare ...
Then why do patients lie in excrement on NHS wards with 3 "nurses" on duty when under the old apprenticeship style SRN/SEN system bed sores were eradicated, malnutrition dealt with and nobody was too proud to wipe arrses?
except of course it wasn't was it ...

when you've quite finished talking hyperbolic excrement why don't you emigrate to heily Hate Island where you can live you bigoted rose tinted jingositic life style.


Nowadays everyone is a "staff nurse" and it is all about "management". My father went into a coma on a ward full of degree qualified nurses because nobody paid any attention to the patients as they were too busy
Hyperbole

"managing" the ward instead of nursing whilst my mother, who was an retired SEN, had to phone me to drive 300 miles to meet with the hospital "management" before anyone admitted that he wasn't just faking sleep when my mother visited as the staff claimed.
hyperbole

unfortunately the views of retired Nurses do not correlate with the realities of current clinical practice ...

there are patients nursed on Ordinary wards who not so many years ago would have been nursed in intensive care ( if they were for active treatment rather than just orange formed and left to slip away from 'pneumonia' )

as i said in my previous post the only Nurses i've met who are 'too posh to wipe arses' are the (to a person ) traditionally trained Cadre that make up the Matrons and Directors of Nursing in the NHS ( i've had more practical help from lay general managers when things are dreadful - they've acted as porters, made beds , gone and hunted out the emergency linen stocks ... )

Nursing does not require a degree, nursing require discipline and common sense.
being a HCA requires discipline and common sense , being a nurse requires all those skills bplus the ability to critically analyse manage conflicting patient loads and decision make as well as second guess and cross check the decisions made by trainee Doctors.
 

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