Classic car as a daily runner?

Diogenes' limp

War Hero
I looked at these things when they first appeared on the classic scene, around 30 years ago. They were touted as helping to prevent rust, keeping shite off, and keeping the vehicle physically protected by distancing possible contacts.

I like the idea apart from the preventing rust. It still sucks in and circulates the same moist air as is outside the bubble. To help prevent rust you need an Arizona like atmosphere, so you need to get rid of humidity. I have seen blokes plumb in de-humidifiers to these in the USA where most of the east coast is akin to walking through a swimming pool in the summer. And, in the winter the cold air so moisture laden that I have seen what look like the odd snowflake spontaneously form in otherwise clear air.

Looks like a Targa to me, what year is it? I had a 1969 911T Targa, next year when done with the house build I am looking to get a penis substitute GT3..........prices have gone stupid on them at the moment with covid, so I am hoping they will come down, or it'll be an S.
If the car is worth that much, running a Meaco DDHL Junior dehumidifier in the tent could be well worthwhile
providing the twin fan airflow isn't too great. Mine is powered continuously but runs according to the need it detects to maintain the setting required. Runs throughout the winter maintaining the fully fitted interior of a 10 metre classic motor-sailer in its berth in Scottish weather. Average cost £10-15 per month for electricity. Connected to a run off, it gets left to its own devices for 2 - 3 weeks on end.
 

964ST

LE
If the car is worth that much, running a Meaco DDHL Junior dehumidifier in the tent could be well worthwhile
providing the twin fan airflow isn't too great. Mine is powered continuously but runs according to the need it detects to maintain the setting required. Runs throughout the winter maintaining the fully fitted interior of a 10 metre classic motor-sailer in its berth in Scottish weather. Average cost £10-15 per month for electricity. Connected to a run off, it gets left to its own devices for 2 - 3 weeks on end.
I think I understand what you are saying?

You can collect prostitutes and suggest that breathing is not really necessary, then you buy a"dehumidifier"?
 
If the car is worth that much, running a Meaco DDHL Junior dehumidifier in the tent could be well worthwhile
providing the twin fan airflow isn't too great. Mine is powered continuously but runs according to the need it detects to maintain the setting required. Runs throughout the winter maintaining the fully fitted interior of a 10 metre classic motor-sailer in its berth in Scottish weather. Average cost £10-15 per month for electricity. Connected to a run off, it gets left to its own devices for 2 - 3 weeks on end.

People just don't know how much water can be pulled out of the air, it surprised me when I was told on the aircon course I did. An average domestic household aircon in the eastern most third of the USA will suck approx 7 gallons of water out of the air during a day. I had a a dehumidifier running in addition to an aircon down in my cellar in Pennsylvania and that used to produce another 5 gallons a day.

Keeping air moving is one thing, but the air needs to be at optimum humidity too. As said, on the east coast more moisture needs to be sucked out of the air. Yet go to Arizona, Nevada, and parts of Utah and the aircon units there have water injectors to add moisture..........many people run outdoor sprinkler like systems too so that outdoor air has some mositure in it so they can sit out in the evenings. Lots of people when they first move to the desert states suffer from nose bleeds due to breathing in the dry air all day.
 

964ST

LE
People just don't know how much water can be pulled out of the air, it surprised me when I was told on the aircon course I did. An average domestic household aircon in the eastern most third of the USA will suck approx 7 gallons of water out of the air during a day. I had a a dehumidifier running in addition to an aircon down in my cellar in Pennsylvania and that used to produce another 5 gallons a day.

Keeping air moving is one thing, but the air needs to be at optimum humidity too. As said, on the east coast more moisture needs to be sucked out of the air. Yet go to Arizona, Nevada, and parts of Utah and the aircon units there have water injectors to add moisture..........many people run outdoor sprinkler like systems too so that outdoor air has some mositure in it so they can sit out in the evenings. Lots of people when they first move to the desert states suffer from nose bleeds due to breathing in the dry air all day.
You do Not! want to be bored to death with a 737 NG or Airbus 319\blah/blah air conditioning systems?

Yep, its HEPA. :)
 
You do Not! want to be bored to death with a 737 NG or Airbus 319\blah/blah air conditioning systems?

Yep, its HEPA. :)

Fuckit, take an excellent for your collection instead of an informative:).
 

Diogenes' limp

War Hero
People just don't know how much water can be pulled out of the air, it surprised me when I was told on the aircon course I did. An average domestic household aircon in the eastern most third of the USA will suck approx 7 gallons of water out of the air during a day. I had a a dehumidifier running in addition to an aircon down in my cellar in Pennsylvania and that used to produce another 5 gallons a day.

Keeping air moving is one thing, but the air needs to be at optimum humidity too. As said, on the east coast more moisture needs to be sucked out of the air. Yet go to Arizona, Nevada, and parts of Utah and the aircon units there have water injectors to add moisture..........many people run outdoor sprinkler like systems too so that outdoor air has some mositure in it so they can sit out in the evenings. Lots of people when they first move to the desert states suffer from nose bleeds due to breathing in the dry air all day.
The result of living 4-5 months at 2000 metres in Southern California for several years is permanent damage
to the lining of a nostril.
 
That is because it never rains there. Allegedly.

It does rain in most parts of California at some time of the year.

I go to Temecula regularly (look it up on the map) and I pootle out to the desert and up the mountains, because I can, Its gorgeous. On the face of the dusty, sandy, barren desert like landscape you would think it never rained. Look more closely and you can see the channels, and run offs cut by torrential downpours. My first couple of days there the dryness in the summer hits my nose like a sandpaper assisted blowtorch. A tip if anyone ever finds themselves in that kind of a climate: smear some vaseline up inside your nostrils it stops them from drying out and bleeding.
 

TamH70

MIA
Aye she’s a peach.

Working well as my daily runner. Despite the tatty roof it doesn’t leak and the heater is very good for these cold mornings.

I’m probably putting 100 miles a week on it at the moment.

Obviously it’s 33 years old and there is still a big list of jobs to do, but they’re mostly cosmetic or silly little things like sorting the ridiculously dim dashboard lights.

It puts a smile on my face every time I get in it. Which is what driving should be all about.

Even the missus likes driving it.

Can’t wait until spring when I can get the roof off again.

Have you let Young Master Ravers and Young Miss Ravers have a cabbie in your Vee Dub like you've done with your Series Landy?
 
It does rain in most parts of California at some time of the year.

I go to Temecula regularly (look it up on the map) and I pootle out to the desert and up the mountains, because I can, Its gorgeous. On the face of the dusty, sandy, barren desert like landscape you would think it never rained. Look more closely and you can see the channels, and run offs cut by torrential downpours. My first couple of days there the dryness in the summer hits my nose like a sandpaper assisted blowtorch. A tip if anyone ever finds themselves in that kind of a climate: smear some vaseline up inside your nostrils it stops them from drying out and bleeding.
So Albert Hammond was lying?
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Have you let Young Master Ravers and Young Miss Ravers have a cabbie in your Vee Dub like you've done with your Series Landy?
Not yet for 2 reasons.

1. I don’t really want them ragging it round the fields and I’m not sure the public road is a great idea yet.

2. The seat is fucked and you can’t adjust it properly. It’s currently set for 6’2” bloke with very long legs.
 

TamH70

MIA
Not yet for 2 reasons.

1. I don’t really want them ragging it round the fields and I’m not sure the public road is a great idea yet.

2. The seat is fucked and you can’t adjust it properly. It’s currently set for 6’2” bloke with very long legs.

Fair enough. I was going to make a joke about how can you manage to drive it, then I remembered that you could afford to hire the services of a really good hitman, so I refrained.
 

Diogenes' limp

War Hero
It does rain in most parts of California at some time of the year.

I go to Temecula regularly (look it up on the map) and I pootle out to the desert and up the mountains, because I can, Its gorgeous. On the face of the dusty, sandy, barren desert like landscape you would think it never rained. Look more closely and you can see the channels, and run offs cut by torrential downpours. My first couple of days there the dryness in the summer hits my nose like a sandpaper assisted blowtorch. A tip if anyone ever finds themselves in that kind of a climate: smear some vaseline up inside your nostrils it stops them from drying out and bleeding.
For me, Big Bear/Fawnskin area, in a past life. It's pretty much all snow melt run off that creates the runnels and feeds Big Bear Lake up there.

But on thread, imagine the surprise of finding a Citroen Dyanne up there, perfectly preserved and running. Owned by what I think is now called a nerd. Mind you, that is whacky corner. The odd MG Midget as well, nil rust but sun/UV damage quite severe.
 

Latest Threads

Top