Classic British dishes dying out

#1
this article at least says so


Traditional British dinners are being replaced by 'foreign quick fixes' as they take too long to cook.

Classic dishes such as toad in the hole, bubble and squeak and hot pots are dying out are diasppearing from the family dinner table, a survey shows.

Researchers found almost one in three people now opt for pizza or spaghetti bolognese at the majority of meal times.

And more than a quarter of adults polled named Italian as their favourite type of food.

However, not all British classics are disappearing as the research found that roast dinners and jacket potatoes are still firm favourites.

Kathryn Race from The Potato Council, which carried out the poll, said: "It's a shame to see that some of our country's best loved foods are no longer seen on UK dinner tables - they are our heritage and something we need to keep.

"However, we are travelling the world more than ever now, and it seems we are trying to recreate the dishes we sample abroad once we get back home.

"Foreign foods and the ingredients needed to make those dishes are also readily available in supermarkets making it far easier to cook them back at home, although this is, it seems, at a price."

The study of 2,000 people found that 82 per cent think traditional British meals are disappearing from our dinner tables.

More than a quarter say they haven't got time to make proper British meals and another quarter simply prefer foreign alternatives. But three quarters of people think we should make more of an effort to bake traditional foods at meals times.

The research showed:

Top foods for dinner 50 years ago:
# 1. Stew and dumplings
# 2. Liver and onions
# 3. Toad in the hole
# 4. Bubble and squeak
# 5. Hot pot
# 6. Jacket Potatoes
# 7. Oxtail soup
# 8. Faggots
# 9. Gammon
# 10. Cornish pasties

Top foods for dinner now:
# 1. Roast dinner
# 2. Jacket potatoes
# 3. Spaghetti Bolognese
# 4. Pizza
# 5.Salad
# 6. Lasagne
# 7. Curry
# 8. Fish and chips
# 9. Pasta bake
# 10. Stir fry

would you agree?

it's a bit like that here also ... you got all those döner and kebab snack bars
and most ppl rather warm up stuff in the microwave than cooking a real good meal
 
#2
Oh I don't know. we had roast venison last night with some new potatoes and veg. NOw that's an easy dinner. Put venison in oven to roast. Go to pub. Come back, put veg on. Glass of.

It's done!

:hungry:

Cold cuts tonight. Venison steaks for a couple of evenings and then back to rabbit.

We did have Beef chilli with rice at the weeked so that would support the trend. I suppose curry is the "foreign" dish we have most often. Usually rabbit or venison.
 
#4
jack-daniels said:
My Dad used to eat Pigs Dripping butties. Surprisingly, he's still alive.
Dripping Sandwiches my that takes me back to my youth


Mind you had Toad in the Hole on Saturday Night, some still left over so thats dinner tonight
 
#5
it's the same here

curry - or let's rather say asian food -
same as anything italian - greek or turkish you will find very often

though i still like cooking traditional dishes such as stews aso
i know quite a lot of ppl who never ever do
 
#6
Bollocks, in most fancy restaurants one sees classic British dishes on the menu.

Curry, one could argue it is traditionally British (kedgeree anyone?) and I believe 'curry' powder was a British invention.

As I understand it, classic British cuisine is coming back in, thanks to Gary Rhodes, Brian Turner and often Gordon Ramsey.
 
#7
For those of "a certain age", the Classic British dishes bring back memories of post-War rationing, and the fact that "foreign food" was unobtainable.

Pace Stab's venison and rabbit, which is cheating and akin to murder [do you do mail order? :wink: ] tha vast majority of Classic British is boring, heavy or both .. and tends to be [forgive me, folks] poor people's food.

Here we try to run the variety of [self-prepared] Italian, Oriental and British ... whilst trying to alternate Beef/Pork/Poultry/Seafood, and taking out a small mortgage on Lamb occasionally.

Celebrate variety ... but prepare and cook yourself.
 
#8
blue-sophist said:
For those of "a certain age", the Classic British dishes bring back memories of post-War rationing, and the fact that "foreign food" was unobtainable.

Pace Stab's venison and rabbit, which is cheating and akin to murder [do you do mail order? :wink: ] tha vast majority of Classic British is boring, heavy or both .. and tends to be [forgive me, folks] poor people's food.

Here we try to run the variety of [self-prepared] Italian, Oriental and British ... whilst trying to alternate Beef/Pork/Poultry/Seafood, and taking out a small mortgage on Lamb occasionally.

Celebrate variety ... but prepare and cook yourself.
I suppose if you had to go out and collect the fuel for the stove it must have tasted good nonetheless :wink: :wink:
 
#9
blue-sophist said:
For those of "a certain age", the Classic British dishes bring back memories of post-War rationing, and the fact that "foreign food" was unobtainable.

Pace Stab's venison and rabbit, which is cheating and akin to murder [do you do mail order? :wink: ] tha vast majority of Classic British is boring, heavy or both .. and tends to be [forgive me, folks] poor people's food.

Here we try to run the variety of [self-prepared] Italian, Oriental and British ... whilst trying to alternate Beef/Pork/Poultry/Seafood, and taking out a small mortgage on Lamb occasionally.

Celebrate variety ... but prepare and cook yourself.
You live on an island entirely surrounded by fish! Forage for yourself!

(I could post some venison but I'd worry over how long it took to arrive....)

Do you think there would be a market for mail order venison or rabbit curry?
 
#12
There's certainly a market for the recipes for those curries, please. I'll swap you for bacon roly poly, or even 'real spotted dick and custard'.

And I'd suspect there will be a market for these recipes if the credit crunch really bites. Beef skirt, neck of lamb, and all those cheap cuts which have to be cooked long and slow will come into their own again.

Having said that, I'm on prawns and pasta for tea, but I did have a delicious liver and bacon yesterday. (It's great when the offspring leave home!)
 
#13
Grownup_Rafbrat said:
There's certainly a market for the recipes for those curries, please. I'll swap you for bacon roly poly, or even 'real spotted dick and custard'.

And I'd suspect there will be a market for these recipes if the credit crunch really bites. Beef skirt, neck of lamb, and all those cheap cuts which have to be cooked long and slow will come into their own again.

Having said that, I'm on prawns and pasta for tea, but I did have a delicious liver and bacon yesterday. (It's great when the offspring leave home!)
The woods will soon become depleted, cooking "long and slow" at ever increasing energy prices could be a false economy...

Look up recipes from thebrigade of Gurkhas on the arrsepedia. i posted another one on here a couple of weeks ago. The Army (Gurkha) cookbook recipes are good but not very hot by modern tastes.
 
#14
EX_STAB said:
Grownup_Rafbrat said:
There's certainly a market for the recipes for those curries, please. I'll swap you for bacon roly poly, or even 'real spotted dick and custard'.

And I'd suspect there will be a market for these recipes if the credit crunch really bites. Beef skirt, neck of lamb, and all those cheap cuts which have to be cooked long and slow will come into their own again.

Having said that, I'm on prawns and pasta for tea, but I did have a delicious liver and bacon yesterday. (It's great when the offspring leave home!)
The woods will soon become depleted, cooking "long and slow" at ever increasing energy prices could be a false economy...

Look up recipes from thebrigade of Gurkhas on the arrsepedia. i posted another one on here a couple of weeks ago. The Army (Gurkha) cookbook recipes are good but not very hot by modern tastes.
Depends whether using a slow cooker, which uses very little power, or even a haybox! (I use the simmering oven of my faithful Aga, which can be considered expensive to run, but does so much more than just cook!)

I saw those recipes. Scarily, some of the egg ones looked very like the ones I have in an old notebook of my Dad's from the 50s-60s.
 
#15
Grownup_Rafbrat said:
EX_STAB said:
Grownup_Rafbrat said:
There's certainly a market for the recipes for those curries, please. I'll swap you for bacon roly poly, or even 'real spotted dick and custard'.

And I'd suspect there will be a market for these recipes if the credit crunch really bites. Beef skirt, neck of lamb, and all those cheap cuts which have to be cooked long and slow will come into their own again.

Having said that, I'm on prawns and pasta for tea, but I did have a delicious liver and bacon yesterday. (It's great when the offspring leave home!)
The woods will soon become depleted, cooking "long and slow" at ever increasing energy prices could be a false economy...

Look up recipes from thebrigade of Gurkhas on the arrsepedia. i posted another one on here a couple of weeks ago. The Army (Gurkha) cookbook recipes are good but not very hot by modern tastes.
Depends whether using a slow cooker, which uses very little power, or even a haybox! (I use the simmering oven of my faithful Aga, which can be considered expensive to run, but does so much more than just cook!)

I saw those recipes. Scarily, some of the egg ones looked very like the ones I have in an old notebook of my Dad's from the 50s-60s.
A wood burning stove now attracts reduced rates of VAT because wood is a "carbon neutral renewable energy resource". Wonders never cease!
 
#16
This is what I find amazing, I lived with a French couple and they were awful, truly terrible cooks. They would fry burgers, fry chips, maybe have some microwaveable mashed potato, or another meal would be beef and onion lattice with said microwave mash!

I had to introduce them to other foods (they are now hooked in halloumi). As a student, I lived with a few Chinese people...and they all loved roast dinners, english cheeses, toad in the hole etc.

My girlfriend, who is Japanese says reasonably enough her favourite food after Japanese cuisine is British. We often make the traditional favourites, beef and ale pie, stews (no dumplings) roasts etc.

There is a reputation (or myth?) that British food is heavy, stodgey etc but thats ok, you can alter it anyway you want. It does not have to be like that.

Yes I love British food, but supermarket products tend to be shitty.

(I am dying for a lamb jalfrezi now...)
 
#17
Bigdumps said:
This is what I find amazing, I lived with a French couple and they were awful, truly terrible cooks. They would fry burgers, fry chips, maybe have some microwaveable mashed potato, or another meal would be beef and onion lattice with said microwave mash!

I had to introduce them to other foods (they are now hooked in halloumi). As a student, I lived with a few Chinese people...and they all loved roast dinners, english cheeses, toad in the hole etc.

My girlfriend, who is Japanese says reasonably enough her favourite food after Japanese cuisine is British. We often make the traditional favourites, beef and ale pie, stews (no dumplings) roasts etc.

There is a reputation (or myth?) that British food is heavy, stodgey etc but thats ok, you can alter it anyway you want. It does not have to be like that.

Yes I love British food, but supermarket products tend to be shitty.

(I am dying for a lamb jalfrezi now...)
Bigdumps but no dumplings? How ironic! you ought to make some dumplings, they're good.

Something else that's easy to make of you have a pressure cooker is suet pudding. It's just like making shortcrust pastry but with suet instead of lard. Make your filling. (Rabbit, leek and mushroom in cream sauce is good) line out basin, fill and cover with lid. Cover with foil tied on with string. Steam in pressure cooker.
 
#19
EX_STAB said:
Bigdumps said:
We often make the traditional favourites, beef and ale pie, stews (no dumplings) roasts etc.

Bigdumps but no dumplings? How ironic! you ought to make some dumplings, they're good.

Something else that's easy to make of you have a pressure cooker is suet pudding. It's just like making shortcrust pastry but with suet instead of lard. Make your filling. (Rabbit, leek and mushroom in cream sauce is good) line out basin, fill and cover with lid. Cover with foil tied on with string. Steam in pressure cooker.
You can also bake the dumpling mix in a hot oven to get a nice crispy outside and a light, soft inside. Stodge? I don't think so.

Try:

4 oz (100g) SR Flour
half teaspoon of dried mixed herbs
2 oz (50g) shredded suet
salt if desired

Combine the ingredients and bind with water, or an egg if you're rich, to make an elastic dough. Divide into 10-12 small pieces and roll into balls.

Add to the pan about 15 minutes before cooking is complete and continue cooking.

Or

Form into a flat shape about three quarters of an inch thick (2 cm?) and bake in a hot oven for 15-20 minutes.

Yum.

And I expect it would do for ex_Stab's steamed pudding, too.
 
#20
Or:

Scone topping.
Make your casserole. Make a large savoury scone. (Just like a sweet scone but leave out the sugar and dates)
put the scone over the top of the (nearly finished) casserole in a hot oven until it's risen and gone off. Must admit I haven't done that recipe for 17 years!
 

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