Civvie slackers are biggest problem for ex-soldiers

#2
I note there was no mention of 'swamping' in his research?

Do civilians 'swamp' or is this pasttime still the peserve of the Armed Forces?
 
#3
I have just read the article and agree with the findings. Having taken off my uniform 10 years ago after 27 years in green and joining the Civil Service, you can tell who the ex-squaddies are by their willingness to get things done and the general work ethic evident. The majority (but not all) of what I would term "full-time civvies" are quite happy to make an appearance, chat to colleagues, use the internet to research something (not work-related!) and e-mail mates. I do it myself sometimes, like reading and contributing to ARRSE, but actually can leave for home knowing that the pay I've received for the work I've done during the day (and often at home) has been earned.
 
#4
Norfolknchance said:
I have just read the article and agree with the findings. Having taken off my uniform 10 years ago after 27 years in green and joining the Civil Service, you can tell who the ex-squaddies are by their willingness to get things done and the general work ethic evident. The majority (but not all) of what I would term "full-time civvies" are quite happy to make an appearance, chat to colleagues, use the internet to research something (not work-related!) and e-mail mates. I do it myself sometimes, like reading and contributing to ARRSE, but actually can leave for home knowing that the pay I've received for the work I've done during the day (and often at home) has been earned.
On the same note, most civie CS seem to think 'being off sick' is extra holiday entitlement to their leave package! :evil:
 
#5
Airfix said:
I note there was no mention of 'swamping' in his research?

Do civilians 'swamp' or is this pasttime still the peserve of the Armed Forces?
Note that the press release is a speck compared to the 82,000 words of the main document which will be on the web in full in the next few weeks. Of course civilians have a private and a public life (at work or not at work) and observations on their personal habits out-with the workplace is not believed to have been a feature of this lengthy research project.
 
#6
"One valuable lesson from the army was an appreciation that you need to say something three times before you're heard and understood, although, despite the temptation you don't always need to shout".
Good research.

Good research.

Good research.

<checks email, watches clock, makes private phone call, scratches arse through tracksuit bottoms, votes in trade union ballot to go on strike>
 
#8
Good work, Jim!

(Mind you, I never manage to make a meeting on time, have a desk strewn with paper and walk around with my hands in my pockets. I also ended up in a security job.)
 
#9
I Totaly agree i may only be an ex stab but some of the civies i've worked with since i hung up my kit have to have been the biggest bunch of lazy sh1t's i've ever met. never turned up on time, didnt get stuck in to get the job done and cleared off early leaving me to pick up the slack. it's anoyedme that much im planning brusihng of my green kit
 
#10
Whiskybreath said:
Good work, Jim!

(Mind you, I never manage to make a meeting on time, have a desk strewn with paper and walk around with my hands in my pockets. I also ended up in a security job.)
Thanks. So whiskeybreath, you work undercover as a civvie then?
 
#13
Hardly research, alot of what was mentioned is plainly obvious.

Although, my desk is messy and I have my hands in pockets (tickling my nuts), I'm never late for a parade.
 
#14
I like to think that ex-squaddies are the biggest problem for civvie slackers, too!
 
#15
I believe 'swamping' to be a hobby peculiar to the forces. So too is the obsession with sharing the experience of 'crimping one off'.

But the idleness thing? I reckon it's one of the few practises that those called to task have in common with those who are far too feeble to be considered for such duties.

I base this view on time spent observing gentlemen from the Turkish Army in Kabul, who spent an entire afternoon imitating that bloke from CSI Miami, taking sunglasses off, putting sunglasses on - repeatedly until rotated back to Ankara.

Equally indolent were the Legionnaires who turned a VCP in the 'Stan into a souk for cool shades, trying dozens of pairs on while 'ne'er do wells' smuggled their dodgy cargoes through without a single inspection.
 
#16
It's partly jealousy though isn't it? The same happened during ww2, say between dockers and RN/merchant marine. The latter complained that the men building or repairing the ships were a bunch of jobsworth, over-unionised slackers. The former moaned that the sailors were institutionalised yes-men with a history of strike breaking.

Interestingly, the Prison Officers' Association (the screws' union) has a high proportion of ex-services members. So given a bit of organisation and encouragement, ex-squaddies can make effective trade unionists, quoting the rule book with the best of them.
 
#17
Moodybitch said:
So, alot of ex squaddies think that most civvies are slackers.

Hardly a newsflash.
This is a long standing misapprehension.
The civvy and the soldier have different basic motivations.

Civvies have to work because they need the money. They are therefore pulled along reluctantly by their need for it.

Soldiers don't join the army for the money. They are there because they want to be there. So they are pushed along willingly like they have a rocket up their arrse. :D

Civvies are always having to think about their own needs. This leads to fatigue and depression.
Soldiers think mostly about the army and not themselves. This makes them happier and more energetic.
Its well known to psychologists that those who immerse themselves in their work and forget their own needs get more joy out of life. They call it a 'fugue state.'

It also helps that the soldier is also part of an indentifiable tribe.
In parts of the world where tribal life exists people go around with smiles on their faces. They are all as individuals living for the tribe.
When the white man turns up and starts hiring them to work in sweat shops it undermines the tribal cohesion. This leads to family breakdown, alcholism and other problems.

One of the problems faced by the demobbed soldier is finding out that his new work mates just aren't as passionate about what they are doing as he is. To the civvy the ex soldier seems too wired up.

You just have to let it go. And quietly realise that the days when you felt so great you could burst are now past.

From an old soldier, welcome to the world of the shrivelled soul, the sagging gut and bags under the eyes so large you could use them on your next trip to Tescos. :D
 
#18
Please don't tar all of us civvies with the same brush, I have not had a day off sick for years and I get sick of some of the civvie slackers who also slag off the military with whom they are supposed to be working and treat them like a lower life form. I spend most of my time trying to stick up for those in uniform.
 
#19
The study based on in-depth interviews with ex-soldiers explodes many myths associated with ex-soldiers returning to work and highlights a number of important issues:

Employers know little more about soldiers’ roles than they did 50 years ago
Most soldiers do well when they return to civilian life
Ex-soldiers dislike the term ‘veteran’

I would argue vehemently with the last point herein mentioned. I'm proud to be a veteran!
 
#20
goodkurtz said:
Moodybitch said:
So, alot of ex squaddies think that most civvies are slackers.

Hardly a newsflash.
This is a long standing misapprehension.
The civvy and the soldier have different basic motivations.

Civvies have to work because they need the money. They are therefore pulled along reluctantly by their need for it.

Soldiers don't join the army for the money. They are there because they want to be there. So they are pushed along willingly like they have a rocket up their arrse. :D

Civvies are always having to think about their own needs. This leads to fatigue and depression.
Soldiers think mostly about the army and not themselves. This makes them happier and more energetic.
Its well known to psychologists that those who immerse themselves in their work and forget their own needs get more joy out of life. They call it a 'fugue state.'

It also helps that the soldier is also part of an indentifiable tribe.
In parts of the world where tribal life exists people go around with smiles on their faces. They are all as individuals living for the tribe.
When the white man turns up and starts hiring them to work in sweat shops it undermines the tribal cohesion. This leads to family breakdown, alcholism and other problems.

One of the problems faced by the demobbed soldier is finding out that his new work mates just aren't as passionate about what they are doing as he is. To the civvy the ex soldier seems too wired up.

You just have to let it go. And quietly realise that the days when you felt so great you could burst are now past.

From an old soldier, welcome to the world of the shrivelled soul, the sagging gut and bags under the eyes so large you could use them on your next trip to Tescos
. :D
Oh my God how depressing. But you've hit it on the head GK.

This doesn't just happen to old soldiers, though. All sorts of people in various professions face being demobbed in the end.

I know it's not quite the same as leaving the forces, but facing up to any form of 'redundancy' from any number of professions is a b'stard.
 

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