Civil Defence food stocks being used for military meals

Yokel

LE
I am sure I started a thread on civil defence and disaster preparedness, and stores and equipment that local communities could keep in the local area and train volunteers to use, but for some reason it seems to have been deleted. Why?

Forget about nuclear attack, what sort of food stocks could be stored (and how?) in case the food supply was interrupted for a few weeks? No grain imports perhaps?

What else could be stockpiled?
 

TheAssassin

War Hero
I am sure I started a thread on civil defence and disaster preparedness, and stores and equipment that local communities could keep in the local area and train volunteers to use, but for some reason it seems to have been deleted. Why?

Forget about nuclear attack, what sort of food stocks could be stored (and how?) in case the food supply was interrupted for a few weeks? No grain imports perhaps?

What else could be stockpiled?
Everyone for themselves. Fortunately the ignorant/stupid/majority have no idea how to survive without a shop/supermarket.

Those of us in the know, we know
 

Yokel

LE
Everyone for themselves. Fortunately the ignorant/stupid/majority have no idea how to survive without a shop/supermarket.

Those of us in the know, we know
Surely the problem is we have all got used to just in time systems and buying things as they are needed. What normal people keep x weeks worth of supplies?

Additionally many people no longer have the skills to cook from basic ingredients. Where is the resilience?
 
True resilience would be pitch forking from your door step mongs who can just about shove a frozen pizza in the microwave, can't cook pasta but see your 500g of spirali as desirable.

Counter attack is then raiding their fairy light festooned badly aligned stack of bog roll.
 
handful of years ago, I used to drive (Cheshire/Shropshire area) past a sign (white with red border) stating direction of Grain Storage.There may be reasons why government still has the facilities even now.

ETA

Its on Whitchurch Road and still there
View attachment 452711
The former RAF Tilstock. Just south of Whitchurch on the A41. I remember that sign (or its predecessor(s)) from probably 30 or 40 years ago. There used to be cold stores dotted around too, eg

 
ISTR many years ago being told by somebody that every so often they’d be a glut of dried food stuffs on the open market such as dried peas etc as the stocks were rotated. (Sold off when they cane to the end of their life and replenished)

istr reading on here a few years back that bulk quantities of Canadian wheat were kept in storage and then released as part of an emergency food stockpile. I think they meantime do something about the aged wheat was better at making bread but the EU didn’t like the U.K. storing Canadian wheat as it impacted on the CAP.

somebody once told me that cat and dog food is of a standard in the U.K. so it can be eaten by people in emergency’s

I was under the impression that cat and dog food is sourced from meat and cereals that was considered unfit for human consumption, but acceptable for pets and zoo animals. The old accepted myth is that back in the late fifties incoming newbies from the Caribbean, and the african states, ate tinned pet food, they survived.
 

TheAssassin

War Hero
Surely the problem is we have all got used to just in time systems and buying things as they are needed. What normal people keep x weeks worth of supplies?

Additionally many people no longer have the skills to cook from basic ingredients. Where is the resilience?
No-one should be taking responsibility for the irresponsible. When the petrol shortages in early 2000s happened, I witnessed a lot of empty shelves where the bread was because they (single mothers usually) didn't want their kids to go without, but the shelves with the bread ingredients were full. Parents could have taught their kids basics in the kitchen, and in an emergency, it's just the basics you need.

I generally have enough food in house to be comfortable for at least two weeks, but in emergency would last over a month. I haven't bought any extra of anything. If things do turn desperate, I just have to cross the road to the many (foreign-run) stores and buy what I need in abundance as it's basically the supermarkets that are running low - no-one realises how over-stocked the little stores are
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
I was under the impression that cat and dog food is sourced from meat and cereals that was considered unfit for human consumption, but acceptable for pets and zoo animals. The old accepted myth is that back in the late fifties incoming newbies from the Caribbean, and the african states, ate tinned pet food, they survived.
The internet can help.
The Food Standards Agency said:
Pet food which is made up from material of animal origin can be used by the pet food industry. It is made up by parts of animals which are surplus to human consumption needs or are not normally consumed by people in the UK.

Material of animal origin comes from animals which are inspected and passed as fit for human consumption prior to slaughter. The material must be free of transmissible disease, which therefore excludes material from dying, diseased or disable animals.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The food stocks kept by HM Goverment for Civil/Home Defence during the Cold War was limited to things like sugar and fat. Once tinned meat was part of it but it was discontinued after being connected to a disease outbreak.

Somewhere on the web there must be a list of what MAFF stockpiled.
There were buffer depots located outside the likely blast areas but close to major cities. Mostly sold off
 
Got around two months worth of Froggie mil ratpacks in my garage, along with another two or three months of tinned and dry goods that just seem to accumulate in a store room near the pool.

Going dom Saffer troep hard routine on the rat packs should stretch them to six months, but why bother? The neighbours should be well cured in my smokehouse by then.
 

Dicky Ticker

War Hero
I imagine that the population has doubled or trebled since they planned civil defence. The population has also lost its social uniformity and cohesion, and so there is probably not the slightest chance of any national rationing regime along the lines of 1940-5, or was even possible up until the 1970s. Instead, much of the current population will likely turn to looting and violence in the event of a national emergency.
Not to mention the rise of vegetarian / vegan / food intolerant members of the community who would complain it isn't <insert fad of choice>.

Two options, take it or leave it.
 
Which is why I’ve had to add a completely new range of food to my stash, because I’m now gluten and lactose intolerant. That’s not through choice,I just don’t want to be stuck at home in ‘isolation’ sh1tting blood
 
I was on deployment Spring - Autumn 04. The Ship wasn't allowed to provision alongside, instead we had to take on tins and tins of war stock food that'd been broken out for TELIC 1, that they now needed to get rid of.

There's nothing like being on the Mediterranean and having to eat boiled tinned potatoes...
 

Yokel

LE
Thinking of the current concerns over resupply of the supermarkets, I wonder if one of the lessons for future crises will be the need to keep warehouses in various regions with basic foodstuffs and hygiene supplies?

There must be thousands of empty warehouses and disused barns all over Britain.
 
The following foods were held in the 1980s:
  • Flour - This was a special high protein, low moisture content flour which was turned over every 4-5 years.
  • Yeast - Packed in tins with an expected life of 10 years.
  • Sugar - Held in 56 lb sacks and turned over if it started to deteriorate.
  • Fat - Known as ‘Ministry Marge’ with an expected shelf life of 20 years.
  • Biscuits - Sweet biscuits in large tins apparently baked in the 1960s.
Some glucose sweets were apparently produced, but found to be too expensive. There have been suggestions that some baby foods and convenience foods were also held, but given the general scarcity of the known stocks this seems unlikely. During the 1960s tinned meat and cake mix was held, but at its peak during the last war, the strategic stockpiles were enormous; with large amounts of frozen and tinned meat and other products including tea and ‘Ministry Soup’.
Yes, we used to get the biscuits early 1960's came in large, square, olive drab tins. I liked them, nice with tined cheese. Also pom, dried potatoes reconstituted with added water, disgusting. Also Australian chicken, tined cooked rabbit , very nice.
 

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