Civil Defence food stocks being used for military meals

ACAB

LE
The Canadian wheat thing I read here too last year about RAOC bread, because we had the facilities to store this particular type of flour it actually improved, Now commercial flours are chemically "improved". Manitoba flour springs to mind.

The cat/dog food thing is actually odd. Fast Food Nation said that cats and dogs were formally ingredients of pet food but there was uproar when it became known. It then was basically meat not fit for human consumption classification used , but have heard recently it was law change that meant they had to use meats/by-products fit for human consumption. The human emergency need may be a bit far-fetched but it is cheaper than other emergency options
When I was training for the plod in 1988 we were informed that all pet food was required by Law to be fit for Human Consumption.
 
When I was training for the plod in 1988 we were informed that all pet food was required by Law to be fit for Human Consumption.
It's all fit for human consumption as proved by the fact a human tastes it as part of the quality control process.
 

4(T)

LE
We had a huge one near us, the in laws neighbour was a workshop manager in the same "compound" until he retired - he had nothing to do with the grain, he just managed a vehicle workshop for another govt agency on the same site. He told me that they had got rid of the lot out of the building on his site and that the lot was being gotten rid of nationally................must have been 15'ish years ago now.

I imagine that the population has doubled or trebled since they planned civil defence. The population has also lost its social uniformity and cohesion, and so there is probably not the slightest chance of any national rationing regime along the lines of 1940-5, or was even possible up until the 1970s. Instead, much of the current population will likely turn to looting and violence in the event of a national emergency.

I doubt we have any long term civil defence or contingency planning at all left in UK. Anything that costs money has been scrapped to chuck funds at the welfare state, people require gratification of their needs right now, and the political classes won't put any energy into something that won't get a vote at the next poll.
 

Yokel

LE
On that note - if you had to plan on emergency national food stores in case of a major crisis, where would you start? What type of thing would you stock?

Has food technology developed since the disposal of the Cold War stocks to allow a wider range of things to be stored?
 
On that note - if you had to plan on emergency national food stores in case of a major crisis, where would you start? What type of thing would you stock?

Has food technology developed since the disposal of the Cold War stocks to allow a wider range of things to be stored?
Grain, you can make bread and vodka. Everything else you forage for
 

Awol

LE
Slight thread drift..... In 1990 myself and girlfriend (later wife, and later still.... not wife) bought an old Bedford CF van which I converted into a camper, and we headed off into Europe with no real plan of where to go., just hoboing it.

In the event we dipped into Italy and then, because of the horrendous prices, did an about turn, turned right and entered the newly opened Eastern Europe. I can't remember exactly which country it was, but I think, it was Hungary, where we encountered long queues every morning outside the inevitably solitary village shop.

Once in the shop we discovered tins and tins of...... things. All the labels were in Cyrillic and impossible to translate, so it became a habit to just pick a couple of tins of everything (there were only probably about ten choices anyway, and the shelves were generally stripped bare by midday) and hope for the best.

Some tins conveniently had pictures on the labels, so finding peaches, pears etc inside was not a surprise, however some didn't and on more than one occasion we found some really foul smelling meat product inside.

It could have been Hungarian ghoulash (unlikely, because I've had plenty from MRE packs, so I know what it should taste like), it could have been a type of corned beef, but, from the fatty, slimy appearance I really doubt it....... or, it could have been dog food.

We decided the latter and always binned it, but I've always wondered...... was it designed for human consumption? If so, I really pity the Hungarians because it was truly gopping.
 
On that note - if you had to plan on emergency national food stores in case of a major crisis, where would you start? What type of thing would you stock?

Has food technology developed since the disposal of the Cold War stocks to allow a wider range of things to be stored?
The American system was stockpile for you and your family, people will be more likely to loot supermarkets
 
On that note - if you had to plan on emergency national food stores in case of a major crisis, where would you start? What type of thing would you stock?

Has food technology developed since the disposal of the Cold War stocks to allow a wider range of things to be stored?
Beetroot. It would last for ******* ever. On the basis that no **** would eat it.
 
Slight thread drift..... In 1990 myself and girlfriend (later wife, and later still.... not wife) bought an old Bedford CF van which I converted into a camper, and we headed off into Europe with no real plan of where to go., just hoboing it.

In the event we dipped into Italy and then, because of the horrendous prices, did an about turn, turned right and entered the newly opened Eastern Europe. I can't remember exactly which country it was, but I think, it was Hungary, where we encountered long queues every morning outside the inevitably solitary village shop.

Once in the shop we discovered tins and tins of...... things. All the labels were in Cyrillic and impossible to translate, so it became a habit to just pick a couple of tins of everything (there were only probably about ten choices anyway, and the shelves were generally stripped bare by midday) and hope for the best.

Some tins conveniently had pictures on the labels, so finding peaches, pears etc inside was not a surprise, however some didn't and on more than one occasion we found some really foul smelling meat product inside.

It could have been Hungarian ghoulash (unlikely, because I've had plenty from MRE packs, so I know what it should taste like), it could have been a type of corned beef, but, from the fatty, slimy appearance I really doubt it....... or, it could have been dog food.

We decided the latter and always binned it, but I've always wondered...... was it designed for human consumption? If so, I really pity the Hungarians because it was truly gopping.
It wouldn’t have been Hungarian because they don’t use the Cyrillic alphabet. Bulgaria maybe?
 
It wouldn’t have been Hungarian because they don’t use the Cyrillic alphabet. Bulgaria maybe?
Slight thread drift..... In 1990 myself and girlfriend (later wife, and later still.... not wife) bought an old Bedford CF van which I converted into a camper, and we headed off into Europe with no real plan of where to go., just hoboing it.

In the event we dipped into Italy and then, because of the horrendous prices, did an about turn, turned right and entered the newly opened Eastern Europe. I can't remember exactly which country it was, but I think, it was Hungary, where we encountered long queues every morning outside the inevitably solitary village shop.

Once in the shop we discovered tins and tins of...... things. All the labels were in Cyrillic and impossible to translate, so it became a habit to just pick a couple of tins of everything

Some tins conveniently had pictures on the labels

It could have been Hungarian ghoulash
As do a few FYR languages use cyrillic, so you could have entered Yugoslavia, which was usually tourist friendly
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Yes

There were emergency food stocks in West Berlin. These were routinely turned over by the RAOC and ACC, within shelf life. I'm sure there were other examples.

@Joker62 will know more I'm sure.

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I know that when in Germany, we used to regularly get stocks of Compo sent down to the kitchens as they were close to use by dates.
 
handful of years ago, I used to drive (Cheshire/Shropshire area) past a sign (white with red border) stating direction of Grain Storage.There may be reasons why government still has the facilities even now.

ETA

Its on Whitchurch Road and still there
View attachment 452711
One near to Buckingham as well. I am keeping the location secret in case of WW3. I have removed the sign as a precaution, well that's not quite true!!! I came off the road in the car last week on some black ice and struck the sign. Lucky no witnesses at the time and I managed to put the sign in the back of the car without being seen. Shame about the acquired round metal post shape in the passenger door but it should polish out in time.
 
The American system was stockpile for you and your family, people will be more likely to loot supermarkets
Good luck with that after day 3, or day 4 if you are lucky. I mentioned on a different thread about there only being 5 days worth of food in the UK food supply chain - effectively from the field to the supermarket shelf. This was presented to Parliament to demonstrate that the UK is dependent on a steady stream of edibles from external sources and what could happen if there was a breakdown in the chain.

There was an official report knocking around out there in WebWorld somewhere, but I can only find a Daily Wail article about the subject:

Source: ===>


Snippet: ===>

By the end of Day One, if there was still no petrol, the shelves would be looking pretty thin. Imagine, then, Day Two: your fourth, fifth and sixth meal. We'd be in a panic. Day three: still no petrol.

What then? With hunger pangs kicking in, and no notion of how long it might take for the supermarkets to restock, how long before those who hadn't stocked up began stealing from their neighbours? Or looting what they could get their hands on?

There might be 11 million gardeners in Britain, but your delicious summer peas won't go far when your kids are hungry and the baked beans have run out.

It was Lord Cameron's estimation that it would take just nine meals - three full days without food on supermarket shelves - before law and order started to break down, and British streets descended into chaos.

One of the reasons we left the UK was the financial hiccup in 2008, the Mrs coming home from work and telling me that the banks were in the shit and they had no clue what to do. Some of them reckoned we were not far off being flung back 100 years if cash lost its value and all the shares crashed. I lived in a nice village and when I looked around I thought, yup we live on an island with over 60 million people who would be desperate. They are all going to be fighting for the last roll of toilet paper, and last packet of haribos, and if a bad winter hits with no fuel oil, or electricity there are probably only enough tree's for firewood to last a fortnight. For all its faults the US is a big place, you can lose yourself and there is plenty of food on the hoof if needed.
 
I was under the impression that, that was in case the Russians tried to impose a blockage again like the one which led to the Berlin airlift in 1948/49
Blocakage is far more likely to occur if you ate the biscuits.
 

ACAB

LE
Slight thread drift..... In 1990 myself and girlfriend (later wife, and later still.... not wife) bought an old Bedford CF van which I converted into a camper, and we headed off into Europe with no real plan of where to go., just hoboing it.

In the event we dipped into Italy and then, because of the horrendous prices, did an about turn, turned right and entered the newly opened Eastern Europe. I can't remember exactly which country it was, but I think, it was Hungary, where we encountered long queues every morning outside the inevitably solitary village shop.

Once in the shop we discovered tins and tins of...... things. All the labels were in Cyrillic and impossible to translate, so it became a habit to just pick a couple of tins of everything (there were only probably about ten choices anyway, and the shelves were generally stripped bare by midday) and hope for the best.

Some tins conveniently had pictures on the labels, so finding peaches, pears etc inside was not a surprise, however some didn't and on more than one occasion we found some really foul smelling meat product inside.

It could have been Hungarian ghoulash (unlikely, because I've had plenty from MRE packs, so I know what it should taste like), it could have been a type of corned beef, but, from the fatty, slimy appearance I really doubt it....... or, it could have been dog food.

We decided the latter and always binned it, but I've always wondered...... was it designed for human consumption? If so, I really pity the Hungarians because it was truly gopping.
What was the consistency and any added items like??? It might have been Tushonka (Russian canned meat) but you get the idea.
 

Chef

LE
One near to Buckingham as well. I am keeping the location secret in case of WW3. I have removed the sign as a precaution, well that's not quite true!!! I came off the road in the car last week on some black ice and struck the sign. Lucky no witnesses at the time and I managed to put the sign in the back of the car without being seen. Shame about the acquired round metal post shape in the passenger door but it should polish out in time.
Well the site I posted has been known for years, Oddly enough, passed by on exercise and we thought was funny. Was just surprised it is still an MoD site
 
What was the consistency and any added items like??? It might have been Tushonka (Russian canned meat) but you get the idea.
Tushonka is a great word, sounds like the noise a compo log would make hitting a concrete floor.

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