CIA Hold Terror Suspects in Secret Prisons in Eastern Europe

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Red Shrek, Nov 2, 2005.

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  1. washingtonpost.com
    CIA Holds Terror Suspects in Secret Prisons
    Debate Is Growing Within Agency About Legality and Morality of Overseas System Set Up After 9/11
    By Dana Priest
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Wednesday, November 2, 2005; A01



    The CIA has been hiding and interrogating some of its most important al Qaeda captives at a Soviet-era compound in Eastern Europe, according to U.S. and foreign officials familiar with the arrangement.

    The secret facility is part of a covert prison system set up by the CIA nearly four years ago that at various times has included sites in eight countries, including Thailand, Afghanistan and several democracies in Eastern Europe, as well as a small center at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba, according to current and former intelligence officials and diplomats from three continents.

    The hidden global internment network is a central element in the CIA's unconventional war on terrorism. It depends on the cooperation of foreign intelligence services, and on keeping even basic information about the system secret from the public, foreign officials and nearly all members of Congress charged with overseeing the CIA's covert actions.

    The existence and locations of the facilities -- referred to as "black sites" in classified White House, CIA, Justice Department and congressional documents -- are known to only a handful of officials in the United States and, usually, only to the president and a few top intelligence officers in each host country.
    The CIA and the White House, citing national security concerns and the value of the program, have dissuaded Congress from demanding that the agency answer questions in open testimony about the conditions under which captives are held. Virtually nothing is known about who is kept in the facilities, what interrogation methods are employed with them, or how decisions are made about whether they should be detained or for how long.

    While the Defense Department has produced volumes of public reports and testimony about its detention practices and rules after the abuse scandals at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison and at Guantanamo Bay, the CIA has not even acknowledged the existence of its black sites. To do so, say officials familiar with the program, could open the U.S. government to legal challenges, particularly in foreign courts, and increase the risk of political condemnation at home and abroad.

    But the revelations of widespread prisoner abuse in Afghanistan and Iraq by the U.S. military -- which operates under published rules and transparent oversight of Congress -- have increased concern among lawmakers, foreign governments and human rights groups about the opaque CIA system. Those concerns escalated last month, when Vice President Cheney and CIA Director Porter J. Goss asked Congress to exempt CIA employees from legislation already endorsed by 90 senators that would bar cruel and degrading treatment of any prisoner in U.S. custody.

    Although the CIA will not acknowledge details of its system, intelligence officials defend the agency's approach, arguing that the successful defense of the country requires that the agency be empowered to hold and interrogate suspected terrorists for as long as necessary and without restrictions imposed by the U.S. legal system or even by the military tribunals established for prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay.

    The Washington Post is not publishing the names of the Eastern European countries involved in the covert program, at the request of senior U.S. officials. They argued that the disclosure might disrupt counterterrorism efforts in those countries and elsewhere and could make them targets of possible terrorist retaliation.

    Article
     
  2. Not if you're a terror suspect
     
  3. Hopefully these "suspects" are being hung by their testicles with cheese wire while they await some spot lamp and phone book treatment from the boys upstairs.
     
  4. Not if you believe in democracy either :roll:

    A concentration or prison camp is just that wether conceived by Stalin, Hitler or Bush
    The end does not justify the means
     
  5. CIA Holds Terror Suspects in Secret Prisons - Debate Is Growing Within Agency About Legality and Morality of Overseas System Set Up After 9/11 - Washington Post, November 2, 2005
    ...About 30 are considered major terrorism suspects and have been held under the highest level of secrecy at black sites financed by the CIA and managed by agency personnel, including those in Eastern Europe and elsewhere, according to current and former intelligence officers and two other U.S. government officials. Two locations in this category -- in Thailand and on the grounds of the military prison at Guantanamo Bay -- were closed in 2003 and 2004, respectively.
    ...By mid-2002, the CIA had worked out secret black-site deals with two countries, including Thailand and one Eastern European nation, current and former officials said. An estimated $100 million was tucked inside the classified annex of the first supplemental Afghanistan appropriation.
    Then the CIA captured its first big detainee, in March 28, 2002. Pakistani forces took Abu Zubaida, al Qaeda's operations chief, into custody and the CIA whisked him to the new black site in Thailand, which included underground interrogation cells, said several former and current intelligence officials. Six months later, Sept. 11 planner Ramzi Binalshibh was also captured in Pakistan and flown to Thailand.
    But after published reports revealed the existence of the site in June 2003, Thai officials insisted the CIA shut it down, and the two terrorists were moved elsewhere, according to former government officials involved in the matter. Work between the two countries on counterterrorism has been lukewarm ever since...

    The government denies this: NEWSPAPER REPORT: Secret jail report 'untrue' - The Nation, November 3, 2005
    ..."This is a completely groundless story. There is no secret al-Qaeda detention site here in Thailand," Government spokesman Surapong Suebwonglee said in response to the report...

    Earlier: Saddam in Thailand? - December 16, 2003
    Sources have long contended that most high level prisoners from Afghanistan and Iraq were first interrogated in Thailand (Thai officials deny this). Thus, rumors started to swirl as Saddam's capture was announced that Saddam himself was either on his way to Thailand or was already here. On Sunday night, the Associated Press reported that Saddam had been moved out of Iraq. CNN reported that Saddam was in Qatar, but the next day this was denied. This is the usual pattern: 'sources' tell various news outlets about the whereabouts of a high-ranking POWs and then the next day this is matter-of-factly denied.

    john
     
  6. Many people approve of this. They wlll continue to do so right up to the moment that they find themselves in one of these establishments. Then it will be too late for them to object.