Churchill The “Villain”!

#61
Churchill wasn’t a villain. That was Thatcher. She stole the children’s milk.
I loved Thatcher, and getting rid of that bloody milk was one of the best things she did. Our school milkman (obviously some sort of lazyarsed socialist nitwit), used to just dump the crate on the corner of the wall around the playground and there it stayed until breaktime. In the summer the little bottles were thoroughly warm and the milk disgusting.
I’d have been happy if Maggie had not only banned the repugnant shite, but also come round to our school and kicked fuck out of the milkman.
 
#62
In the summer the little bottles were thoroughly warm and the milk disgusting.
And in the winter they were a milk popsicle, that's if the blue tits hadn't got there first.
 
#63
What if Britain had done a deal with the Nazis, as Lord Halifax and others wanted? There would have been no way of supporting Russia with supplies from the UK and US whilst they rebuilt their war industries in 1941/1942.

The Luftwaffe ace Adolf Galland reckoned the Battle of Britain was the turning point. Or maybe it was D-Day and opening the second front, which could only happen after the U-boat wolfpacks were defeated in 1943?

If the Germans had been able to concentrate their resources against the Soviets how different would history be?
that's exactly my point
 
#64
What if Britain had done a deal with the Nazis, as Lord Halifax and others wanted? There would have been no way of supporting Russia with supplies from the UK and US whilst they rebuilt their war industries in 1941/1942.

The Luftwaffe ace Adolf Galland reckoned the Battle of Britain was the turning point. Or maybe it was D-Day and opening the second front, which could only happen after the U-boat wolfpacks were defeated in 1943?

If the Germans had been able to concentrate their resources against the Soviets how different would history be?
I forgot to mention the North African/Mediterranean campaign diverting German and other axis troops, aircraft, and naval forces down and denying Hitler access to the Middle East oilfields, and also the Bomber offensive which tied up a million Germans and wore away their industrial capabilities.

Does Owen Jones really think none of this had anything to do with the allied victory?
 
#66
I do not recall bottles of milk, but I do recall triangular cartons of milk that came in stackable orange containers. I left school before Thatcher came to power in 79.
She allegedly nicked the milk in 1971 - but loads of people can remember being forced to drink the tepid, warm, curdling stuff long after that. I was born in 1973 and can remember the daily hell of forced lactose ingestion at morning break. You weren't allowed out to play until you'd necked the lot.

Except for Adam E., the jammy lactose-intolerant cunt.
 
#67
Andrew Neil delivers a fine monologue riposte that places Churchill in context:

Andrew Neil Nails It On Churchill as BBC Announce End of This Week -
"Neil is one of the few true heavyweights left on the BBC, they will miss him when he’s gone… "

Which is why he is going - they can't have someone there who'll actually ask difficult questions and cut wibbling morons (stand fast, Abbott and Jones) off at the knees when they wibble moronically.

No, they need more Warks, who'll interrupt messages at odds with the "agenda" whilst letting those spouting the approved right-on claptrap chunter on unimpeded and uncorrected when they distort facts and peddle outright fibs.

Winston must be rotating in his box at what we've allowed those we put in charge to turn us into.
 
#68
He occasionally got something right , but Gallipoli and Narvik..... my dad remembered the Gallipoli widows spitting at him when he came to Manchester in 1940.
I genuinely have problems believing that. The Lancashire Fusiliers that landed only a few were from Manchester, Most were from Bury and surrounding areas, and oddly enough Ireland and the home counties. I do not wish to belittle the ANZAC contribution but The LF's and the Munsters had the toughest landings. I am proud to have marched and talked to six lads who landed that fateful day (ok I was only a Sea Cadet but hey, history marks you).
My family also grew out of the debacle. My great uncle married the daughter of his fathers Sargent from Ireland. Oddly enough, I married a distant relative unknowingly (by marriage). That makes me proper NI. So it does.
 
#70
One has to give a genius a bit of leeway.
Not sure we had any one else who could have done the job he did in 1940. 1915 was another matter he certainly screwed Gallipoli up, but again he had the balls to go to France as a CO of 6 RSF - not sure any of the Luvvie Politicos we have today would have done it!
Churchill gets the blame for the Dardanelles adventure, but the idea for it came from Kitchener. Churchill was enthusiastic for it but after the withdrawal there was a lot of political score-settling.
 
#71
Want to see how idiotic the mindset which drives all this is?

Off you go. Secure all breakable objects first though.

Crimes of Britain
What a tosser. I hope the author is being hunted down with a view to a bit of "enhanced interrogation" by people with knowledge of boathouse decor for this particular PERSEC-bothering episode:-

The SAS: A British death squad

I mean, black gaffer tape is not that expensive...!








Especially when you swipe it from the ROV stores when they're all busy on deck hitting the thing with hammers.
 
#72
I forgot to mention the North African/Mediterranean campaign diverting German and other axis troops, aircraft, and naval forces down and denying Hitler access to the Middle East oilfields, and also the Bomber offensive which tied up a million Germans and wore away their industrial capabilities.

Does Owen Jones really think none of this had anything to do with the allied victory?
The chap with whom he was debating this story on the news asked him why he was happy to indulge in revisionist reputation- bashing of figures like Churchill, but less so of those beloved by the left-Mandela, Ghandi, etc.

His rather weak riposte was that Mandela was castigated enough whilst he was still in prison. He seemed to be saying that Tories at the time wore little “HANG MANDELA” badges. Which seems fanciful.
 
#74
His Wiki page needs some serious revising, by the look of it...

Ewen Sinclair-Maclagan - Wikipedia
I think the entry has hints of his failure -
Exhausted after dealing with Turkish counterattacks the following day, he was relieved of his command.[
The following day was the day after the landing, but yes, the entry still contains traces of the spin placed on the landings to explain the failure.
 
#75
I genuinely have problems believing that. The Lancashire Fusiliers that landed only a few were from Manchester, Most were from Bury and surrounding areas, and oddly enough Ireland and the home counties. I do not wish to belittle the ANZAC contribution but The LF's and the Munsters had the toughest landings. I am proud to have marched and talked to six lads who landed that fateful day (ok I was only a Sea Cadet but hey, history marks you).
My family also grew out of the debacle. My great uncle married the daughter of his fathers Sargent from Ireland. Oddly enough, I married a distant relative unknowingly (by marriage). That makes me proper NI. So it does.
Well, I wasn't there but my dad wasn't one to exaggerate. My mum's dad and his brother were 8th Manchesters - a territorial battalion and were certainly there in Gallipoli. My grandfather stayed with the battalion retiring as a CSM in the early 30's.
 
#76
I have a feeling that this round of anti-Churchill sentiment was kicked off by Daniel Finkelstein in the Times (DANIEL FINKELSTEIN, february 12 2019, 5:00pm, Winston Churchill was a racist but still a great man), which inflamed my keyboard for a day or so. Finkelstein did temper his column with: "A proper and rigorous account of Churchill’s life reveals him to be a flawed person with erratic judgment, but his greatness remains intact." but I could still see no good reason for raising the subject at all, other than to fill a weekly wage gap for Finkelstein.

McDonnell and others followed this up solely to demonstrate their own credentials.
That would depend on when Mcdonald made his statement. Do you have the date of the Politico event.
 
#77
Andrew Neil delivers a fine monologue riposte that places Churchill in context:

Andrew Neil Nails It On Churchill as BBC Announce End of This Week -



However, if you follow the YouTube link to where some chap has posted Neil's piece, then - rather depressingly but entirely predictably - the first comment is from hard left loon who states that evil Mr Churchill was responsible for WW2 by failing to respond to kind peace-loving Mr Hitler. Such is the grip of left wing revisionism on contemporary awareness of historical events.
Thanks for that, I’d missed both Neil’s nail-on-the-head monologue and the unwelcome news of the end of This Week.
I’ll pass on the worthless and idiotic lefty iconoclasm though.
 
#78
The debate about Churchill is revisionism in many respects, its being carried out as an exercise to excuse or explain the mass murders carried out by Stalin & Mao by hard left so called intellectuals and cheerleaders.

[B] @[B]AaronBastani[/B][/B]
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the abominations of the Holodomor and Great Chinese Famine were borne of trying to catch up with more advanced economies. Unnecessary, cruel, violent, tragic. What was Churchill's excuse regarding the Bengal Famine?


This gentleman, one of Corbyns fan boys is a classic example, he blames mass famine due to massive mismanagement of agriculture ie collective farming as a necessary mistake so both Russia and China could leap forward to match more advanced economies.

This is the sort of stuff being pumped out in order to push the agenda that a communist or near type of communist government ala Corbyn & Co. would not be harmful to the UK.

This message is being played out across all social media platforms on an hourly basis.
 
#79
What was Churchill's excuse regarding the Bengal Famine?[/B]
The short answer is WWII.
However there were many other factors which produced the perfect storm including natural disasters and local mismanagement.
 
#80
He occasionally got something right , but Gallipoli and Narvik..... my dad remembered the Gallipoli widows spitting at him when he came to Manchester in 1940.
At a family funeral this week my elderly uncle told me that when Churchill visited Mornington Crescent post war on his election campaign the crowd heckled him with shouts of 'warmonger'.
 

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