Chunky floating shelf / mantel piece

#1
Just had a woodburner installed and am after ideas for a chunky mantel piece. Where is the best (cheapest) place to by a suitable chunk of wood and any ideas on fixing it to the chimney breast in a floating fashion?
 
#2
Just had a woodburner installed and am after ideas for a chunky mantel piece. Where is the best (cheapest) place to by a suitable chunk of wood and any ideas on fixing it to the chimney breast in a floating fashion?
B&Q sell the kits quite cheaply. I'd google it, but I'm too lazy.
 
#3
Im after something cheaper and chunkier to be honest. Thanks though.
 
#4
get an old railway sleeper from a salvage yard.
 
#6
Reclamation yards are good for a bit of proper seasoned wood (oak is best in my opinion) with character and thick enough for a decent mantle. To attach use a 1" auger, drill 4 or more holes in wood and wall, glue in "1 dowels into mantle, let dry then glue into holes in wall. Seemples, smart and very eye catching.
 
#7
Floating shelves are excellent to look at but useless. The recommended max weight is about 15 Kg so when you put anything on them they gradually start to tilt downwards.
 
#8
I'd agree with 5A's answer, I've always sought out reclamation yards, especially as most of them do a nice line in old timber beams that have been shot blasted, so they're ready for staining/varnishing. Might be worth looking at Pitch Pine as it's cheaper than Oak, although neither are that expensive for a short length like a mantlepiece. Couple of quid per foot last time I bought one (although it was about 5 years ago).
 
#9
Sounds good, thanks for all the answers.
 
#10
Floating shelves are excellent to look at but useless. The recommended max weight is about 15 Kg so when you put anything on them they gradually start to tilt downwards.
True of the one's available from B&Q etc, but if you have a strong enough bracket, you would have a much stronger shelf. Depending on how good you are at DIY, you could make a suitable bracket yourself, of get a blacksmith to knock you one up.
 
#11
Good point about them tilting, if the plaster surface is not flaking or loose, I'd back up the glued dowels with a tube or two of the 'no nails' panel adhesive spread over the back face to prevent this.
 
#13
I think 5A hit the nail on the head, its going to be more for appearance than having stuff on it to be honest. Well, maybe the cat may try it once.
 
#14
I think 5A hit the nail on the head, its going to be more for appearance than having stuff on it to be honest. Well, maybe the cat may try it once.
A lot depends on the wall as to how it can be fixed + the weight of the shelf itself.

is it stone, brick, breeze-block or even plasterboard?
 
#15
Stone. Victorian father, sorry, terrace.
 
#16
Railway sleepers tend to be made of better than average pine and have spent many many years stabilising which means thy're not going to do anything strange shapewise. The hard bit is finding someone who will run one through his saw to take 50mm off every edge. My neighbour used some as a false lintel above his fire and it looks bang on.

The floating shelf thing is great as long as you do the under pinnings correctly. You need to make sure that you are right back into the stone work and if you don't have a brick/stone wall and still want to do it you need to tie into every stud. You wont get the ironmongery for a shaved sleeper from B&Q so make friends with an engineer who knows a blacksmith.
 
#17
You can get new railway sleepers off fleabay for £15.

I would consider fixing threaded stud bar into the wall with resin as anchors.
 
#18
If you have access to the rear of the wall, you can gripfill threaded bar into your prospective mantel, let the gripfill cure over two days, a challenger couldnt pull them out, drill slightly larger holes through the wall to allow for slight misalignment, have large plates made and drilled centrally, fit nuts and split washer then normal washer, then plates to back of the wall, tighten nuts till mantel held firmly against wall. The maximum damage is holes to allow m8 to m12 threaded bar through the wall, I wouldnt like to drill larger than 25mm holes in an old wall.
 
G

goatrutar

Guest
#19
Railway sleepers tend to be made of better than average pine and have spent many many years stabilising which means thy're not going to do anything strange shapewise. The hard bit is finding someone who will run one through his saw to take 50mm off every edge. My neighbour used some as a false lintel above his fire and it looks bang on.

The floating shelf thing is great as long as you do the under pinnings correctly. You need to make sure that you are right back into the stone work and if you don't have a brick/stone wall and still want to do it you need to tie into every stud. You wont get the ironmongery for a shaved sleeper from B&Q so make friends with an engineer who knows a blacksmith.
Railway sleepers made from pine?
 
#20
Railway sleepers made from pine?
Red pine, oregon pine (douglas fir), and various others have all been used for sleepers. I know that they use/used oak etc for sleepers but I've not seen one in person so can't comment.
 
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